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eBook Good News Bad News ePub

eBook Good News Bad News ePub

by David Wolstencroft

  • ISBN: 0340831642
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: David Wolstencroft
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton (May 2005)
  • Pages: 448
  • ePub book: 1329 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1156 kb
  • Other: lit lrf lit lrf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 474

Description

Mark Lawson on Good News, Bad News, a welcome debut from the creator of Spooks, David Wolstencroft. Wolstencroft impressively twists all this into the quadruple-helix shape required from thriller narratives these days

Mark Lawson on Good News, Bad News, a welcome debut from the creator of Spooks, David Wolstencroft. Wolstencroft impressively twists all this into the quadruple-helix shape required from thriller narratives these days. His plotting is like being dropped in the desert; we never know with any certainty where we are. Unexpected developments also make bright use of unlikely knowledge - such as the use of prosthetic masks in the film business. However, protectionists in the novelists' union always scrutinise moonlighters from TV and the movies for an over-reliance on dialogue.

GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS is a fun read Put GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS at the top of your Don't Miss list for 2004.

GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS is a fun read. I may have read a better book (or two) this year, but I have not read one that is as enjoyable an experience as this one is. Wolstencroft has somehow mastered the ability of injecting humor into his narrative without sacrificing an iota of suspense. Put GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS at the top of your Don't Miss list for 2004. Even if you hate espionage novels, Wolstencroft's style and wit will keep you interested and aboard this wild ride, and scanning the television listings for those episodes of "MI-5" that you missed.

Good News, Bad News book. GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS (nce/Canada-Cont) – G+ Wolstencroft, David – 1st book Dutton, 2004- Hardcover Charlie Miller and George Shaw are two men working in a photo-processing booth. They also happen to be two secret agents, although neither knows about the other.

by David Wolstencroft. Good news is that this is a page-turning spy romp. Bad news is it comes to an end. Good news is that it's a happy ending. Bad news is that to believe that it is a happy ending means that you are nuts. Good news is that the author might write another novel. Bad news is that means he won't write Spooks. Find similar books Profile.

Good News, Bad News is a spy/espionage novel by British author David Wolstencroft. The novel was first published in 2004, and was Wolstencroft's first novel. It was published by BCA by arrangement with Hodder & Stoughton. The novel revolves around two men, Charlie Millar and George, both secret agents who are mistakenly placed together as employees in a photo kiosk at Oxford Circus. Neither man is aware of the other's real identity

In between, Good News, Bad Newsturns the rules of the spy game upside down with a story of. .Good News, Bad News is his first book.

In between, Good News, Bad Newsturns the rules of the spy game upside down with a story of intrigue and suspense that is chock-full of delicious surprises right up until the final spin. First, there’s the good news: George and Charlie are on their last posting for the Agency before retiring from the spy game. But in this business, the bad news is never far away. And in this case, the bad news could not be worse. David Wolstencroft is the multi-award-winning writer and creator of the BBC spy drama Spooks, which airs on the A&E network as MI-5. Библиографические данные.

DAVID WOLSTENCROFT was born in 1969. He grew up in Edinburgh but now lives in Los Angeles. He is the creator of SPOOKS, the BAFTA award-winning spy drama, produced by Kudos for BBC ONE. GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS is his first novel

DAVID WOLSTENCROFT was born in 1969. GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS is his first novel. Country of Publication.

January 15 2005, 12:00am, The Times. By David Wolstencroft. Hodder & Stoughton, £10; 356pp. Given the cult following for the BBC’s stylish spy drama Spooks, it’s little wonder that Hodder is pushing the publicity boat out for the first novel by its creator, David Wolstencroft: Good News, Bad News. Spooks is one of those programmes people either love or hate. You can love it for its stylish sets, iconic hi-tech computer kit (a triumph of product placement) and wanton disregard for the lives of its main characters.

Two operatives and long-time friends are transformed into lethal enemies when they receive their final mission before retiring from the Agency-the assassination of each other-embarking on a chase across Europe and North America as they attempt to discover why their bosses want them dead and uncover a shocking secret that could bring the Agency down.

Good News, Bad News" is a spy/espionage novel by British author David Wolstencroft. The novel revolves around the central characters of Charlie Millar and George, both Secret Service agents who are mistakenly placed together working in a photo kiosk at Oxford Circus.

Meet Charlie. An everyday bloke. Good news is, he has a job. Bad news is, it's in a photo kiosk. He whiles away the hours with his rather eccentric colleague George. But appearances can be deceptive. You see, there is one line of work where taking the world at face value can be very foolish indeed. Where trusting someone -- anyone -- is the most dangerous thing you can ever do. The truth is, Charlie and George have not been very honest with each other. The truth is, this isn't their number one career choice. Their real jobs are a hell of a lot more dangerous. It's time to come clean. But the truth could very well kill them!

Comments

Joni_Dep Joni_Dep
You get the feeling, almost from the first page of GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS, that you are reading something special. There are all sorts of influences here, from John le Carre to Monty Python to even John Woo --- but all of it is pure David Wolstencroft. GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS is Wolstencroft's first novel, but not his first artistic work; he is the creator and writer of the British spy drama "Spooks," broadcast in the United States on the A&E Network under the name "MI-5."

Wolstencroft nails every scene, every sentence, every word like the English language had evolved to its present stage just for him. The proof positive here is about halfway through GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS. I am sorely tempted to reproduce the passage here, but I will not because I want you to get this book and read it; suffice it to say that it is contained in a passage that describes the eighteenth century and the Cambridge Library in terms of the feeling that both invoke. The closest that anything comes to it for dead-bang brilliance is Bob Dylan's line from "Visions of Johanna": inside the museum, infinity goes up on trial/voices echo this is what salvation must be like after a while. Yes. Wolstencroft is a bit more scatological in his description, but the emotion it invokes is the same, stated in such a way that, once you have read it, you know that no other way will come close.

But I am ignoring an important element here while getting lost in the literary wonders of this work. GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS is a fun read. I may have read a better book (or two) this year, but I have not read one that is as enjoyable an experience as this one is. Wolstencroft has somehow mastered the ability of injecting humor into his narrative without sacrificing an iota of suspense. I do not believe that I have ever read a novel wherein Edward Lear was referenced, however briefly and indirectly, in the middle of a scene where two guys are desperately on the run, and yet the reference is not stretched or strained; it is perfect.

So what is GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS about? It is so difficult to summarize without giving away the multitude of surprises within. Suffice to say that two British spies, both of whom work for "the Agency," are, for different reasons, ready to retire. They are each given a final assignment: each is assigned to terminate the other. This poses a number of problems: the men are friends, each is aware of the other's assignment, and they have no clue as to what either of them might have done to deserve the extreme termination. As a result, they trust each other with a wary eye as they simultaneously seek to evade death from an unknown source while attempting to determine how their peculiar set of circumstances has come about.

Both men are very, very good at what they do, and are well versed in all the elements of spy craft --- but so is their mysterious pursuer. The fact that neither of the targeted agents has been completely honest with the other heightens the suspense, which would be excruciating if not for Wolstencroft's droll, wonderful wit, which he exhibits in tempered moderation while dealing out surprise after surprise, right up to the final chapter.

Put GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS at the top of your Don't Miss list for 2004. Even if you hate espionage novels, Wolstencroft's style and wit will keep you interested and aboard this wild ride, and scanning the television listings for those episodes of "MI-5" that you missed.

--- Reviewed by Joe Hartlaub
Levaq Levaq
Few novels capture the mood of a nation, especially one in decline, as this one does. It pays homage to le Carre in both spirit and soul. It is emblematic of the hollowness that is modern Britain. Vanished are the old qualities of patriotism, idealism, faith, allegiance and moral purpose. Instead, we are left with characters who are little more than amoral automatons going through existential motions. Yet both Charley and George fight to live even if they have nothing to live for.

The writing is cutting, edgy, even poetic at times in its descriptions of an alternate world of murder without question, secrecy for its own sake, neuroticism to the point of psychosis. The setting and opening were so well designed - from the curious tracking of a mand and woman to the reader's discovery of their true identity to the shocking discovery of their mission. Their almost primordial survival instincts make for great action-packed reading and the occasional lapse into that forbidden area - romantic love - provided depth and even pathos.

There is a beauty in the telling of the spy chief, again symbolic of the modern British spy world. The old friend, the first recruiter who appears to be the only normal one in the bunch, has a cameo before starring toward the end. And the ending - very, very satisfying. In fact, the book, despite its moral bleakness was a kind of morality tale played out on a damp, gray stage. A good read.
Kaghma Kaghma
British Security Services Agents twenty-seven years old Scotsman Charlie Millar and almost fifty George Shaw separately receive good news that their next respective assignments will be their last ones for each of them. The cover for their final assignment is a shabby photo-processing booth, where each must hide his real identity from the other, while awaiting their final mission orders. However, the bad news is that those final assignments are to assassinate the other.

Quickly, Charlie and George realize something is not right as the cover is really for one person. When they learn each other's assignment, they agree to flip a coin with the loser on the run, but first want to learn why their employer would use such a drastic means to terminate them. As Charlie and George work closely together, the good news is that they make headway; the bad news is that treachery runs very high in their agency that wants them and others dead immediately.

The good news for readers is this is an exhilarating espionage tale reminiscent of F/X as Charlie and George trust no one except somewhat each other; the bad news is that the audience needs to set aside several hours to finish in one sitting. The tale hooks the audience once George explains to Charlie in their photo lab section that he is retiring because his cousin's aorta was too tiny to handle the stress. The plot never slows down though it is often amusing with comparative observations on spying and modern life by the delightful George and Charlie until a final explosive confrontation in North America.

Harriet Klausner
Thetahuginn Thetahuginn
"Good News, Bad News" is just plain fun. It takes the classic aggrieved spy tale, betrayed by his masters and turns the genre on its head.

George and Charlie work at a photo kiosk. Charlie suspects George is a spy and, so, spies on George. Charlie also suspects one of the customers of the photo kiosk of being a spy as well and stakes out her hotel. Some sleuth Charlie is: the woman sends over a drink and invites Charlie to her room. Some very interesting events occur, resulting in the rather odd bonding of Charlie and George.

A few days later, some film arrives at the photo kiosk to be developed. Both Charlie and George look through the developed prints and learn something: they are to kill each other.

Turns out Charlie and George are both spies.

From that point on, Wolstencroft weaves a marvelous tale. It kept me awake through the night. I hope it does the same for you.

Jerry