cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Laughing Man, The
eBook Laughing Man, The ePub

eBook Laughing Man, The ePub

by James Hogarth,Victor Hugo

  • ISBN: 1904999840
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: James Hogarth,Victor Hugo
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Kennedy & Boyd (October 30, 2008)
  • Pages: 484
  • ePub book: 1454 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1885 kb
  • Other: lrf lit rtf lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 449

Description

Victor Hugo (Author), James Hogarth (Translator). I won't describe the plot, the mere scaffolding on which Hugo hangs his fluid pudding of words, but pace Henry James, THE ;LAUGHING MAN will entice you into turning pages a lot more compulsively than, say, THE GOLDEN BOWL.

Victor Hugo (Author), James Hogarth (Translator). Leavis would sneer at this book, as would James, as would Percy Lubbock, as would Jane Austenites like Robert Liddell. From their worthy points of view, they'd be correct, but I'd say there's room in the universe of great imaginative literature for a Hugo, as well as a Rabelais and a Celine.

Translated by Joseph L. Blamire (1888). Book I night not so black as man. I Portland bill. Part one: the sea and the night. Two preliminary chapters. V The tree of human invention. VI Struggle between death and night. VII The north point of portland. Book 2 the hooker at sea.

Victor Hugo, James Hogarth. Ursus was a man, Homo a wolf": the former a travelling mountebank, the latter his faithful companion. Gwynplaine was abducted as an infant, and cruelly mutilated so that his face shows the permanent smile of a clown. Abandoned by his abductors some years later, Gwynplaine rescues a blind baby girl from the frozen corpse of her mother at the foot of a gibbet. Time passes, and the young girl - christened Dea - comes to love Gwynplaine

Victor Hugo’s gothic tale has been the inspiration of numerous plays, films (the first in 1909) novels and short stories. Following a distinguished career as a civil servant, James Hogarth acquired a reputation as a versatile and punctilious translator.

Victor Hugo’s gothic tale has been the inspiration of numerous plays, films (the first in 1909) novels and short stories. His translations span travel guides, archaeological texts, and novels. In 2002 he won the French-American Foundation Translation Prize for his English translation of Victor Hugo’s Travailleurs de la Mer. He died in 2006

Victor Hugo’s most popular book is Les Misérables. The Man Who Laughs by.

Victor Hugo’s most popular book is Les Misérables. Victor Hugo.

The Man Who Laughs By. the everlasting presence of the past

The Man Who Laughs By. Ursus Another Preliminary Chapter. Part I. book the first. the everlasting presence of the past. The 172 peers enjoying their dignities under James II. possess among them altogether a revenue of £1,272,000 sterling a year, which is the eleventh part of the revenue of England. In the margin, opposite the last name (that of Linnæus, Lord Clancharlie), there was a note in the handwriting of Ursus: Rebel; in exile; houses, lands, and chattels sequestrated. Time passes, and the young girl - christened Dea - comes to love Gwynplaine

A Romance of English History. possess among them altogether a revenue of L1,272,000 sterling a year, which is the eleventh part of the revenue of England.

A Romance of English History.

Les Miserables (Stepping Stones). by Monica Kulling · Victor Hugo.

“Ursus was a man, Homo a wolf”: the former a travelling mountebank, the latter his faithful companion. Gwynplaine was abducted as an infant, and cruelly mutilated so that his face shows the permanent smile of a clown. Abandoned by his abductors some years later, Gwynplaine rescues a blind baby girl from the frozen corpse of her mother at the foot of a gibbet. Time passes, and the young girl – christened Dea – comes to love Gwynplaine. Being blind, she is unaware of his disfigurement, but from passing her fingers over his face, assumes that he is always happy. Ursus and Homo meet up with Gwynplaine and Dea, and travel around England performing at funfairs. After some vicissitudes, Gwynplaine is, surprisingly, summoned to the court of Queen Anne, where it is revealed that he is in fact the missing heir of the murdered Lord Linnaeus Clancharlie, Marquis of Corleone. He is, accordingly, installed as an English peer; but when he addresses the House of Lords is ridiculed for his clownish features. He renounces his peerage and rejoins his companions, who resolve to abandon England forever. During the voyage, while Ursus sleeps, Dea reveals to Gwynplaine her secret passion for him, then dies. Gwynplaine drowns himself. Victor Hugo’s gothic tale has been the inspiration of numerous plays, films (the first in 1909) novels and short stories. Following a distinguished career as a civil servant, James Hogarth acquired a reputation as a versatile and punctilious translator. His translations span travel guides, archaeological texts, and novels. In 2002 he won the French-American Foundation Translation Prize for his English translation of Victor Hugo’s Travailleurs de la Mer. He died in 2006.

Comments

Mopimicr Mopimicr
Saintsbury called L'HOMME QUI RIT "the maddest book in recognized literature", and I can't improve on that judgment.

LES MISERABLES has been harshly criticized as the most bombastic, digressive 19th century novel, and the same could be said of THE ;LAUGHING MAN--that is, it's bombastic and digressive to the nth degree but I don't intend that as a negative criticism.

It's a waste of time to read Hugo's novels unless you accept that he was a literary monstre sacree. You read him because you're fascinated by the twists and turns of his mind and imagination, not for rigorous attention to perfect form and well-judged content. Stendhal's comment that Hugo exaggerated shamelessly is true but irrelevant if you read him on his own terms.

I won't describe the plot, the mere scaffolding on which Hugo hangs his fluid pudding of words, but pace Henry James, THE ;LAUGHING MAN will entice you into turning pages a lot more compulsively than, say, THE GOLDEN BOWL.

F.R. Leavis would sneer at this book, as would James, as would Percy Lubbock, as would Jane Austenites like Robert Liddell. From their worthy points of view, they'd be correct, but I'd say there's room in the universe of great imaginative literature for a Hugo, as well as a Rabelais and a Celine. Untamed imagination may not be great art, but it's still worthy reading.
Ramsey`s Ramsey`s
Another great Hugo book! What more can any say.
playboy playboy
This is an amazing novel with a mesmerizing plot line that will keep the reader thinking and constantly empathizing with the characters.