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eBook Lions at Lamb House: Freud's Lost Analysis of Henry James ePub

eBook Lions at Lamb House: Freud's Lost Analysis of Henry James ePub

by Edwin M. Yoder Jr.

  • ISBN: 1933372346
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Edwin M. Yoder Jr.
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Europa Editions; 1st edition (September 1, 2007)
  • Pages: 239
  • ePub book: 1346 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1812 kb
  • Other: docx mbr lrf doc
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 630

Description

Yoder’s asks, What if Freud analyzed Henry James in 1908 at Lamb House. Tóibín asks what if we knew what James was thinking and feeling when he failed at writing plays between 1895 and 1900.

Yoder’s asks, What if Freud analyzed Henry James in 1908 at Lamb House. Both writers dare to imitate the Jamesian style as the sincerest form of flattery, but I think that Tóibín did the better job because he demonstrates a far greater command of nuance.

Roger Rosenblatt Praise for Edwin M. Yoder Jr. ' Yoder writes with such wonderful manners, learning, and . Over the course of ten days at Lamb House, the worlds of psychology and literature joust and collide - giving rise to this charming novel of ideas. ' Yoder writes with such wonderful manners, learning, and detachment. William F. Buckley Jr. 'Ed Yoder continues to stand apart. read and be refreshed. Both fans of these masters and lovers of literature will be at turns delighted, shocked, and entertained by this thoughtful and vibrant historical novel from the pen Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Edwin M. Yoder.

Lions at Lamb House' imagines what happens when an Austrian psychiatrist responds to the request of a Boston colleague

Lions at Lamb House' imagines what happens when an Austrian psychiatrist responds to the request of a Boston colleague. The colleague, who fears his brother's intention to rewrite his early novels may be the sign of debilitating neuroses, urges the psychiatrist to visit and evaluate his brother at home in the south of England.

From the moment Freud steps off the train, Edwin M. transports the reader. He has fun watching James (on the couch) trying to outsmart "the Viennese sage" in his lascivious quest for James' "secret alcove. Return to top of the page

Lions at Lamb House : Freud's Lost Analysis of Henry James. Lions at Lamb House' imagines what happens when an Austrian psychiatrist responds to the request of a Boston colleague.

Lions at Lamb House : Freud's Lost Analysis of Henry James.

Lions at Lamb House imagines what happens when an Austrian . The Austrian is Sigmund Freud

Lions at Lamb House imagines what happens when an Austrian psychiatrist responds to the urgent request of a Boston colleague. The colleague, who fears his brother’s intention to rewrite his early novels may be the sign of debilitating neuroses, urges the Austrian psychiatrist to visit and evaluate his brother at home in the south of England. The Austrian is Sigmund Freud. The Bostonian is William James and the novelist is his brother Henry.

Edwin M. Lions at Lamb House. Praise for Edwin M. Yoder J. s Previous Books. Jean-Claude Izzo The Lost Sailors Translated by Howard Curtis Izzo digs deep into what makes men weep. A charming novel of intellectual. He writes with such wonderful manners, learning, and detachment. Time Out New York About the Book From one of France’s best-known authors comes this moving investigation into the human comedy. The men aboard an impounded freighter in the port of Marseilles are divided: Should they wait for the money owed them, or accept their fate and look for work on another ship?

Lamb House is a Grade II listed 18th-century house situated in Rye, East Sussex, England, and in the ownership of the National Trust. The house is run as a writer's house museum.

Lamb House is a Grade II listed 18th-century house situated in Rye, East Sussex, England, and in the ownership of the National Trust. It was the home of Henry James from 1897 to 1914, and later of . Lamb House was built in 1722 by James Lamb, a wealthy wine merchant and local politician. In the winter of 1726 King George I took refuge at the house after his ship was washed ashore at nearby Camber Sands

Book by Yoder, Edwin . J. Lions at Lamb House: Freud's "Lost" Analysis of Henry James. Yoder, Edwin Milton was born on July 18, 1934 in Greensboro, North Carolina, United States.

42536/?tag prabook0b-20. "This wonderful novel discloses the nature of two monumental minds, making each more dazzling in the process. Son of Edwin M. and Mytrice M. (Logue) Yoder.

Journalist and academic Yoder imagines a meeting that turns into a two-week analysis, pitting a doctor obsessed with repression against a writer whose private life appeared defined by it. He is not a perfect storyteller, and this short, entertaining novel is at times jarringly overwritten, with occasionally clunky plotting

"This wonderful novel discloses the nature of two monumental minds, making each more dazzling in the process. . . . A rare book, as moving as it is thoughtful."-Roger Rosenblatt

In 1908, an Austrian psychiatrist visits southern England at the urgent request of a Boston colleague, who fears his brother's intention to rewrite his early novels may be the sign of debilitating neuroses. The Austrian doctor is Sigmund Freud. The Boston psychologist is William James, and the novelist is his brother Henry. Over ten days, the worlds of psychology and literature collide-giving rise to this charming novel of ideas.

Comments

Hawk Flying Hawk Flying
"The calamity you foresaw, my dear Edith, has come to pass. In a weak moment this noon, just after luncheon, I said to Freud: 'You are most welcome, herr doctor, to say on here for another week. . . .' As we were revising his schedule, he suddenly offered to perform a 'short-term' analysis of your full & uninteresting friend, the undersigned."

We are asked to believe that Henry James might have written such a letter to his friend Edith Wharton about his fictional encounter with Sigmund Freud, visiting (it is immediately revealed to the host) at the request of Henry's brother William, who claims to be worried about Henry's "more eccentric preoccupations." Most alarming to William, also a famous psychologist, is that his brother is in the process of rewriting all his books in a "labored style of exquisite Mandarin elaboration which at times reaches a fabulous impenetrability," revised versions that (as James's fans know) will be published in the "New York Edition" of his collected novels. We should all be so neurotic. But Henry willingly subjects himself to psychoanalysis not to effect a cure but rather out of scientific and sociable curiosity. What ensues is a battle of wits, although (unbeknownst to Henry), "herr doctor" is undertaking these sessions with professional seriousness--to the point where he writes up the long-suppressed case study that concludes "Lions at Lamb House."

The social, historical, and chronological leaps made by Edwin Yoder in his story require a suspension of belief that is pretty much impossible for any reader to achieve. So instead of verisimilitude, what we have here is a lark--a series of enjoyable set pieces and "rediscovered" documents that imitate, with varying degrees of competence, the correspondence and journals of these famous historical figures. Having read many of the real James-Wharton letters, as well as the letters between the two brothers, I can vouch for the accuracy in Yoder's tone--although sometimes the substance approaches, intentionally or not, parody. (I am less able to offer an opinion on Freud's ersatz English.)

Overall, then, this novel works best if the reader approaches it as if it were nerdishly humorous caricature rather than historical realism. One of the more amusing ongoing gags is the concern over what James's neighbors think--that the presence of the famous Austrian shrink suggests that the eccentric American novelist has finally lost his mind. ("Do you suppose the poor fellow is balmy?") There is also a visiting young apprentice courting a local debutante--the daughter of an archdeacon, no less--to liven up the sense of countryside scandal, as well as a scattering of faux-Freudian interpretations of James's stories ("is it perhaps your own fear of robust sexuality that is reflected in Isabel Archer?"). I chuckled aloud often enough to make "Lions at Lamb House" enjoyable, even if I didn't believe any of it for a second.
Elastic Skunk Elastic Skunk
Very interesting, useful information. Henry James and his brother William are the post-Civil War generation wherein angst and loss of faith are hallmarks. In steps Sigmund Freud and the dispirited elite grasp at him with hungry hands. That and the rise of the professional university system, (ref. "Killing the Spirit" by Page Smith) and you are set to figure why we are like we are now. What happened? Link these ideas with Henry James short-story "In the Cage," to get a further boost in the Jamesian/Freudian journey. Lovely writing as well. Well worth the time.
Dorintrius Dorintrius
How I wanted to like this book! I'm an inveterate Jamesian (I love reading about him as much as reading him) and I've also put some significant time in with Freud, and the notion of their meeting is of course one of the great tantalizing prospects. I've also been to Rye and Lamb House and stayed at the Mermaid Inn a number of times: so I was ready for a feast. What, alas, we get here is an awkward quilt of rehashed biographical data implausibly sewn into place by the conceit that William James, Henry's psychologist/philospher brother, was worried about Henry writing all those prefaces to his novels and wanted Freud, in the guise of visiting Henry, to report back on Henry's very probably precarious fixated mental state. To imagine this is to reduce all three brilliant men to unwilling puppets. Freud, William and Henry James were so much smarter than this book can begin to convey. The Jamesian letters and dialogue here are particularly cloying and superficial: he sounds like a big fussy queen. There are those who think that James was indeed such a creature (evidently Yoder is one of them); but if you've read deeply into the letters and the biographies and the critical writing and the fiction, you know James was a much wiser man than Mr. Yoder has remotely suggested here. The "psychoanalysis," such as we're able to discern it, is also a travesty -- with Henry James mincing about trying not to talk about "la chose genitale," which is (by Mr. Yoder's assessment) the only thing that interests Freud. It's childish claptrap. I am really coming to think that novelists should keep their hands off Mr. James. Mr. Yoder should keep his hands off Freud, too.