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eBook Ordinary Heroes: A Novel ePub

eBook Ordinary Heroes: A Novel ePub

by Scott Turow

  • ISBN: 0374184216
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Scott Turow
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (November 1, 2005)
  • Pages: 384
  • ePub book: 1310 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1357 kb
  • Other: mbr docx mobi azw
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 312

Description

Out of the courtroom, Turow remains an effective storyteller whose characters (Gita in particular) and details of war create immediacy and intrigue

Out of the courtroom, Turow remains an effective storyteller whose characters (Gita in particular) and details of war create immediacy and intrigue. However, his usual spark seems to be missing. A few critics faulted the novel for introducing too much history, too many mysteries, and too many themes—from war to love to family secrets. In the end, the personal dramas that characterize Turow’s best works carry this, too.

Scott Turow has done it again, this time outside his normal courtroom novels. His books do not follow any predictable formulas. WWII fiction is well trod ground, but Ordinary Heroes still gives some new perspectives

Scott Turow has done it again, this time outside his normal courtroom novels. WWII fiction is well trod ground, but Ordinary Heroes still gives some new perspectives. The characters are unique, flawed and interesting, and you care about what happens to them. I said Scott Turow does not follow formulas, and that is true, but if there is a common theme to his work, it is that all of his characters have secrets.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Stewart Dubinsky knew his father, David, had served in World War II, but had been told very little about his experiences.

Ordinary Heroes, published in 2005, is a novel by Scott Turow. It tells the story of Stewart Dubinsky, a journalist who uncovers writings of his father while going through his things following his funeral. The novel, told in first person, traces Stewart's uncovering of his father David's role in World War II in the European Theatre as a captain in the . Army Judge Advocate General's Corps. It includes scenes set during the Battle of the Bulge.

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Электронная книга "Ordinary Heroes: A Novel", Scott Turow. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Ordinary Heroes: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Ultimate Punishment won the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award

Scott Turow is the author of worldwide bestselling novels including Presumed Innocent, Innocent, The Burden of Proof, Reversible Errors and Limitations. Ultimate Punishment won the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award. He lives outside Chicago, where he is partner in the firm of SNR Denton (formerly Sonnenschein, Nath & Rosenthal).

Book Cover: Stewart Dubinsky Knew His Father Had Served In World War Ii, and he'd been told how David Dubin (as his father had Americanized the name that Stewart later reclaimed) had rescued Stewart's mother from the horrors of the Balingen concentration camp.

Stewart Dubinsky knew his father, David, had served in World War II, but had been told very little about his experiences. Ordinary Heroes A Novel.

Ordinary Heroes A Novel.

Ordinary Heroes by Scott Turow Picador £1. 9, pp320 Since Presumed Innocent in 1987, Scott Turow has continued to produce intelligent, thoughtful novels set among the lawyers of the fictional Kindle County. Turow further has Dubin wonder whether the war is even worth fighting: "It is hard to understand how war - at least this war - has been worthwhile.

Stewart Dubinsky knew his father had served in World War II. And he'd been told how David Dubin (as his father had Americanized the name that Stewart later reclaimed) had rescued Stewart's mother from the horror of the Balingen concentration camp. But when he discovers, after his father's death, a packet of wartime letters to a former fiancée, and learns of his father's court-martial and imprisonment, he is plunged into the mystery of his family's secret history and driven to uncover the truth about this enigmatic, distant man who'd always refused to talk about his war.

As he pieces together his father's past through military archives, letters, and, finally, notes from a memoir his father wrote while in prison, secretly preserved by the officer who defended him, Stewart starts to assemble a dramatic and baffling chain of events. He learns how Dubin, a JAG lawyer attached to Patton's Third Army and desperate for combat experience, got more than he bargained for when he was ordered to arrest Robert Martin, a wayward OSS officer who, despite his spectacular bravery with the French Resistance, appeared to be acting on orders other than his commanders'. In pursuit of Martin, Dubin and his sergeant are parachuted into Bastogne just as the Battle of the Bulge reaches its apex. Pressed into the leadership of a desperately depleted rifle company, the men are forced to abandon their quest for Martin and his fiery, maddeningly elusive comrade, Gita, as they fight for their lives through carnage and chaos the likes of which Dubin could never have imagined.

In reconstructing the terrible events and agonizing choices his father faced on the battlefield, in the courtroom, and in love, Stewart gains a closer understanding of his past, of his father's character, and of the brutal nature of war itself.

Comments

Use_Death Use_Death
The secret life Of David Dubin, a JAG officer during World War II is revealed to his son Stewart shortly after his death. This revelation was made while his son was going through his father's personal belongings. Letters hidden away in a closet were discovered. It was revealed that his father had been having a love affair with another woman. And if that wasn't enough, he had also been recommended for a court-martial.

Stewart is determined to learn everything he can about the father he never really knew. Arduously, his father's life during the war is put back together, piece-by-piece. What he ultimately learns is earth-shattering. His feelings about his father have forever changed.

The author goes to great lengths to describe many of the horrific events that occurred during one of the darkest times of our nation's history. At times, the grizzly facts of war and human suffering were shown to be exceedingly graphic. Sadly, we come to witness the descent of someone's life as a result of the ravages of war. The story progressed from chapter to chapter. From beginning to end, I was driven to read on.
FailCrew FailCrew
The story is interesting as it develops and it will surprise you as it draws to a close. The writing of the war scenes is masterful; he captures the fear, the violence, the physical problems, and just plain luck whether you survive or not, the randomness of it all. It seems impossible that Turow could write like this if he had not experienced it. Once, I had to stop reading it because I was so upset at the war scenes. The point was made by the main character that you never go home the same person you were before combat. Now, I truly understand PTSD. This was mainly focused on The Battle of the Bulge in freezing temperatures. I had an uncle who was in Iwo Jima during WWII; he was against our involvement in Vietnam with a passion.

The writing is masterful but most of the book is about war; be prepared. I prefer the courtroom stories as Turow writes them, and will choose those stories in the future.
Brajind Brajind
Scott Turow is a masterful writer. This was a work of fiction that was written as if it were a son's memoir of his father, and a publishing of his father's account of his war experiences in France and Germany during World War II. The characters were perfectly developed, and I had to keep reminding myself that this was fiction, and not a true account of a man's experience in the terror of war. There were twists and turns and the story never lagged. I felt like this was an accurate portrayal of life on the battlefield, and what it must have been like at the Battle of the Bulge. Whether you're a war buff, or a Scott Turow fan, you won't be disappointed in this novel.
Windworker Windworker
This is not the classic page-turner of nonstop action, cliffhangers, and suspense. But it is classic Scott Turow: intelligent, intricately plotted, and superbly crafted, adding up to an extraordinary mystery that also can't be put down.

Turow, a practicing lawyer best known for his legal drama, wraps the plot only loosely around the law as he treads new ground with this original novel of World War II. Stewart Dubinsky, a middle-aged reporter, knew is father served in Europe during WWII, but the War was a subject off-limits in the Dubinski household. Upon is father's death, Dubinski discovers that his father had been court-martialed and imprisoned, and sets out to find the decades-old answers. What follows is a tale that is anything but ordinary; a deeply emotional and painfully realistic drama of the horrors of war in the European theater.

It is early 1944, and Dubinsky's father, David Dubin, is a young lawyer assigned to the US Army's JAG Corps headquartered in Nancy, France, recently re-occupied by the Allies. He is assigned to investigate the alleged insubordination of Robert Martin, a Major in the CIA-forerunner OSS. Martin is a shadowy figure; a living legend of unparalleled heroism and bravery behind Nazi lines, but perhaps also a spy the loosely allied Soviets. Turow, ever the perfectionist, can be counted on for a richly developed cast of characters. And rarely has there been a character more interesting than the enigmatic Gita Lodz, a Polish immigrant turned French resistance commando, a gritty and war-hardened warrior with as much similarity to Laura Croft as LeCarre's George Smiley has to James Bond. She is also the inseparable companion of Martin, setting up the first two legs of the triangle that Dubin not surprisingly completes. In pursuing Martin - and Gita - through northern Europe, the lawyer Dubin finds himself pressed into service as a front-line infantry officer to replenish Allied troops decimated by the Nazis during the Battle of the Bulge. Told from foxhole-level perspective, Turow paints a horrific picture of the War as brutally vivid and gory as "Saving Private Ryan", while capturing the passion and emotion of Leon Uris' best works. As much a character study as it is a mystery, Turow takes us on his own campaign culminating in a morbidly riveting portrayal of a Nazi concentration camp and ending in an unexpected twist to Major Robert Martin's story.

It is typically three years between Scott Turow's novels, presumably due to the painstaking research he conducts. Delivered with the historical authority and authenticity usually associated with Alan Furst, Turow applies his trademarked plots, clever twists, and human struggles, adding up to a moving and educational drama that you'll likely be recommending to your friends. Well done, Mr. Turow!
melody of you melody of you
Scott Turow has done it again, this time outside his normal courtroom novels. This one is about an investigator during World War II in the European Theater near the end of the war. The reader goes through the worst of the events at the end of the war and the Allied victory, but finds a twist at the end. A very emotional trip.
Knights from Bernin Knights from Bernin
As other reviews mention, this is not a typical legal thriller. But then, Scott Turow is not a typical writer. His books do not follow any predictable formulas.

WWII fiction is well trod ground, but Ordinary Heroes still gives some new perspectives. The characters are unique, flawed and interesting, and you care about what happens to them.

I said Scott Turow does not follow formulas, and that is true, but if there is a common theme to his work, it is that all of his characters have secrets. The plot lines of the books are about how the secrets affect their lives, before and after they are revealed. The characters are well drawn, and he shows you how the story affects all of them, for better or worse.

Why not five stars? Too many typos in the Kindle version. Well worth the time to read, anyway.