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eBook Christmas Stories (Everyman's Library) ePub

eBook Christmas Stories (Everyman's Library) ePub

by Diana Secker Tesdell

  • ISBN: 0307267172
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Diana Secker Tesdell
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Everyman's Library; Everyman's Edition edition (October 30, 2007)
  • Pages: 400
  • ePub book: 1646 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1325 kb
  • Other: rtf doc txt docx
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 790

Description

Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).

Christmas Stories (Everyman's Library). Diana Secker Tesdell. Christmas Poems (Everyman's Library Pocket Poets Series) Hardcover. Stories of the Sea (Everyman's Library Pocket Classics). Paris Stories (Everyman's Library Pocket Classics Series) Hardcover.

Серия: Pocket Classics. As Scheherazade proved long ago, good stories make the best bedtime entertainment. The tales collected here represent the essence of the storyteller's art, with its ancient roots in fantastical legends and tales told around a fire

Серия: Pocket Classics. The tales collected here represent the essence of the storyteller's art, with its ancient roots in fantastical legends and tales told around a fire

About Christmas Stories.

Part of Everyman’s Library Pocket Classics Series. Category: Fiction Classics Literary Fiction. About Christmas Stories. Now joining Everyman’s Library-the most extensive and distinguished collectible library of the world’s greatest works-is an appealing new collection in a small Pocket Classics format, perfect for gift giving and reading pleasure. Christmas Stories is a treasury of short fiction by great writers of the past two centuries-from Dickens and Tolstoy to John Updike and Alice Munro.

Christmas Stories book.

Christmas Stories (9780307267177) by Diane Secker Tesdell .

Love Stories (Everyman's Library) encompasses everything from the unabashedly erotic (Colette) to the .

Love Stories (Everyman's Library) encompasses everything from the unabashedly erotic (Colette) to the sardonically doomed (Dorothy Parker). In literature, as in love, there's something for everyone.

item 4 Christmas Stories (Everyman's Library POCKET CLASSICS) by Diana Secker Tesdell.

Country of Publication. item 4 Christmas Stories (Everyman's Library POCKET CLASSICS) by Diana Secker Tesdell. Christmas Stories (Everyman's Library POCKET CLASSICS) by Diana Secker Tesdell.

(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)Now joining Everyman’s Library—the most extensive and distinguished collectible library of the world’s greatest works—is an appealing new collection in a small Pocket Classics format, perfect for gift giving and reading pleasure.Christmas Stories is a treasury of short fiction by great writers of the past two centuries—from Dickens and Tolstoy to John Updike and Alice Munro. As a literary subject, Christmas has inspired everything from intimate domestic dramas to fanciful flights of the imagination, and the full range of its expression is represented in this wonderfully engaging anthology. Goblins frolic in the graveyard of an early Dickens tale and a love-struck ghost disrupts a country estate in Elizabeth Bowen’s “Green Holly.” The plight of the less fortunate haunts Chekhov’s “Vanka” and Willa Cather’s “The Burglar’s Christmas” but takes a boisterously comic turn in Damon Runyon’s “Dancing Dan’s Christmas” and in John Cheever’s “Christmas Is a Sad Season for the Poor.” From Vladimir Nabokov’s intensely moving story of a father’s grief in “Christmas” to Truman Capote’s hilarious yet heartbreaking “A Christmas Memory,” from Grace Paley’s Jewish girl starring in the Christmas pageant in “The Loudest Voice” to the dysfunctional family ski holiday in Richard Ford’s “Crèche”—each of the stories gathered here is imbued with Christmas spirit (of one kind or another), and all are richly and indelibly entertaining.

Comments

Xaluenk Xaluenk
I love Capote's "A Christmas Memory" so I was willing to pay the price just for that one, but I got a whole set of great stories in the package. This is a handsome hard back, smaller than some of the ostentatious holiday compilations on the market. It is a very nice format. It is a little treasure for me.
Tehn Tehn
This book is something different for the holidays. It has stories by many well-known and respected authors, and is very enjoyable.
Braswyn Braswyn
Just a little different kind of book for folks who
don't want a large tome but.. a few surprising short stories
about Christmas and the season around it.

Good value.. Well made hardcover book
Makes a nice gift for friends who have everything...
Ballagar Ballagar
This collection has the best short story authors, such as Tolstoy and Capote. I originally bought it because I wanted one particular story and was pleasantly surprised with the rest of the collection. I am giving it as a gift this year.
Hanelynai Hanelynai
A GOOD BOOK TO READ AT CHRISTMAS MAYBE A STORY EACH NIGHT. SPEEDY SERVICE GREAT COMPANY TO DO BUISNESS WITH
Clonanau Clonanau
Don't bother. I would not have bought this if I had been able to leaf through it first. Long, tedious, pointless stories, obscure for good reason. I put it in the resale box before I was halfway through. Pity.
Aurizar Aurizar
Every home that celebrates Christmas deserves an anthology of beloved holiday stories that enrich the season. This is not it. Despite the nostalgic cover and the ribbon marker, this rather unpleasant collection lacks most of the familiar and seems to focus on the morbid and depressing. Probably more suited to the jaded and cynical reader, don't buy this one if you are looking for an abridged version of 'A Christmas Carol' to read aloud or 'The Night Before Christmas.' You would do better to buy 'The Kingfisher Book of Christmas Stories' of Michael Hague's Christmas Treasury, or try to buy Tasha Tudor's 'Take Joy' on the secondary market. By all means, save your money and avoid this one. Have a Merry Christmas and, as Tiny Tim observed, 'God Bless us, everyone!'
This book contains 20 short stories by 20 different authors. Most of the authors you are likely to have heard of – Dickens, Gogol, Conan Doyle, Trollope, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Willa Cather, O Henry, Saki, Nabokov, Damon Runyon, Evelyn Waugh, Elizabeth Bowen, John Cheever, Truman Capote, John Updike, Muriel Spark, Grace Paley, Alice Munro, Richard Ford – but in many cases you may not have read the particular story before. All have some connection with Christmas, but that is usually because the action described took place around Christmastime; the count of Santa Clauses, reindeer, snowmen, Christmas trees and plum puddings is not high.

The Dickens story is not ‘A Christmas Carol’ but ‘The Story of the Goblins who stole a Sexton’. It is taken from the Pickwick Papers. Written seven years before ‘A Christmas Carol’, it does have some relationship to the Christmas Carol theme – the Sexton taking the part of Scrooge. The Gogol story, ‘The Night Before Christmas’, is taken from ‘Evenings on a Farm Near Dikanka’; the Conan Doyle is a Sherlock Holmes story, ‘The Blue Carbuncle’.

The Tolstoy, ‘Where Love is, God is’, I was sorry to find uncharacteristically pedestrian. That cannot be entirely the fault of the very old translation (Louise and Aylmer Maude), but neither that nor the Chekhov, 'Vanka' (translated by Constance Garnett), can be said to sparkle, convenient as it may be for the publisher that the translations are out of copyright.

The Gogol, by contrast, translated by the still very much contemporary Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, is excellent (and does offer a goodly amount of snow). That is just as well; occupying 54 pages, it is the longest story in the book.

Second longest (50 pages) is Trollope’s ‘Christmas at Thompson Hall’. Oh dear; we wait such a long time for the principal characters to tumble to realizations we as readers reached long ago, I was reminded of Trollope’s reputed habit of writing 3000 words a day, regardless – and that whilst holding down his job as a Surveyor for the Post Office. I guess the way to do that is to steadfastly plod through a simple linear tale, making no attempt at anything posterity is likely to regard as fine writing.

I didn’t list either geese or turkeys among the Christmas features with a low count in this volume. Sherlock Holmes gives us 26 geese, and Alice Munro, in ‘The Turkey Season’, as many turkeys as were killed, plucked and gutted on a turkey farm in a whole season. Munro’s story is for me the most memorable, and probably the finest, in the whole book. (Well, she did win the 2013 Nobel Prize for Literature.) She places herself, aged 14, working before and after school in the gutting shed of a fictional (not her father’s actual) turkey farm. Her boss, his son, the boss’s sister, a couple of hired women and two hired men are all interesting people in their way, especially to the 14-year-old budding author. Relationships are not easy, there are some blow-ups, and the narrator is savvy enough to realize that there is more going on in the hearts, minds and lives of at least some of her workmates than is openly admitted. Wonderful. (The story is included in Alice Munro’s 1982 short story collection ‘The Moons of Jupiter and Other Stories and is now also available in Selected Stories which has itself been re-published - post-Nobel - as Family Furnishings: Selected Stories, 1995-2014.)