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eBook Officers' Ward ePub

eBook Officers' Ward ePub

by Rory Mulholland,Marc Dugain

  • ISBN: 0753812843
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Rory Mulholland,Marc Dugain
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Orion Pub Co (November 2001)
  • Pages: 192
  • ePub book: 1468 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1972 kb
  • Other: rtf lrf lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 505

Description

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Rory Mulholland's books.

Discover new books on Goodreads. Rory Mulholland’s Followers. None yet. Rory Mulholland. Rory Mulholland’s books. Camp Britney, Tikrit: The Genteel Art of War Reporting.

The Officers' Ward (French, La chambre des officiers), is a novel by Marc Dugain, published in 1998 (1999 in English)

The Officers' Ward (French, La chambre des officiers), is a novel by Marc Dugain, published in 1998 (1999 in English). It is supposedly based on the experiences of one of the author's own ancestors during World War I. Adrien Fournier, a handsome lieutenant in the Engineers, is the narrator and main protagonist

The Officers’ Ward is a biographical novel based upon the life of the author’s grandfather In Marc Dugain's first novel "The Officers' Ward," the French-born author has furnished yet another story (and lesson) from the "War to end all Wars.

The Officers’ Ward is a biographical novel based upon the life of the author’s grandfather. On his first day at the front in 1914, a young engineering officer received a devastating injury. He is among the very first casualties of war on the Western Front. In Marc Dugain's first novel "The Officers' Ward," the French-born author has furnished yet another story (and lesson) from the "War to end all Wars. To say it was "the worst of times" would be an understatement and young Lieutenant Adrien Fournier finds himself an early casualty of the German onslaught.

This engaging summary presents an analysis of The Officers’ Ward by Marc Dugain, a novel which tells the . See the very best of literature in a whole new light with BrightSummaries. com! The Officers' Ward by Marc Dugain (Book Analysis) - eBook.

This engaging summary presents an analysis of The Officers’ Ward by Marc Dugain, a novel which tells the story of one soldier’s brief experience of the First World War and the scars it leaves him with. After his face is horribly disfigured at the beginning of the war, Adrien Fournier is transferred to a military hospital, where he remains for the rest of the conflict. He must resign himself to his new appearance and find the courage to face his friends, family and society as a whole.

Based on a true story, this "extremely compelling novel" delves into the mind of a murderer (Booklist). The Avenue of the Giants follows Al Kenner as he progresses from antisocial adolescent to full-fledged serial killer in the turbulent 1960s and '70s. A giant at over seven feet tall with an IQ higher than Einstein's, Al was never ordinary. His life is tainted by his parents' divorce and his mother's abusive behavior, and it takes a chilling turn on the day of John F. Kennedy's assassination

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Unlock the more straightforward side of The Officers’ Ward with this concise and insightful summary and analysis .

Unlock the more straightforward side of The Officers’ Ward with this concise and insightful summary and analysis!This e. .This engaging summary presents an analysis of The Officers’ Ward by Marc Dugain, a novel which tells the story of one soldier’s brief experience of the First World War and the scars it leaves him with.

Delving into the mind of this complex killer, this novel by the prize-winning author of The Officers’ Ward was inspired by the real-life case of Edmund Kemper, and powerfully evokes an America torn between the pacifism of the hippie movement and the violence of Vietnam. Fiction Thriller & Crime Psychological. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Marc Dugain books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Showing 1 to 30 of 62 results. Most popular Price, low to high Price, high to low Publication date, old to new Publication date, new to old. 1. 2. 3. 51% off.

In the officers' ward of a hospital in Paris, three young men and a woman meet in the early days of the First World War. Each of them has suffered horrific injuries to the face: Adrien, the narrator, Penanster, a Breton aristocrat, Weil, a Jewish aviator, and Marguerite, a nurse, one of the few women in the hospital. The friendship that the four form sustains them through the months and years that follow. When the war ends they are released from hospital, to adapt as best they can to life outside. Based on the true war experiences of the author's grandfather, this is a moving, humorous and humane novel about war and survival. 'A powerful, haunting novel' Mail on Sunday

Comments

Arcanefist Arcanefist
Excellent WW I accounting of a young French officer who is maimed by gas at the front
crazy mashine crazy mashine
The Officers’ Ward is a biographical novel based upon the life of the author’s grandfather. On his first day at the front in 1914, a young engineering officer received a devastating injury. He is among the very first casualties of war on the Western Front.

This man becomes one of a small group of battle-wounded combatants; all with wounds of a magnitude and type for which surgical science of the era had no answers.

I knew Jacques Maliniac, one the real-life models of that group of surgical pioneers, so the story has an unusual personal resonance with me. That small group became the mentors and inspiration of the generation of surgeons who advanced the art and science in WWII. I enjoy giving copies of this small and wonderful novel to plastic and orthopedic surgeons generations removed from those pioneers, to remind them of the giants in whose steps they walk, and the reasons why they chose surgical careers aimed at the restoration of form and function.

The Officers’ Ward is a treasure for surgeons with a sense of surgical history, to own, to read, and to share with the next generation.
Fearlessrunner Fearlessrunner
Perhaps the tragedies, the horrors, and the heroics of World War I have been
chronicled over and over, but perhaps, still, not often enough. In Marc Dugain's first
novel "The Officers' Ward," the French-born author has furnished yet another story (and
lesson) from the "War to end all Wars."
To say it was "the worst of times" would be an understatement and young
Lieutenant Adrien Fournier finds himself an early casualty of the German onslaught. He's
devastatingly wounded--much of his face is blown away--and he's transported to Paris to
await recovery and rehabilation for the rest of the war, some five years or so. A bright
young man (an engineer by education), and handsome, he must now face a future
grotesquely disfigured and to a whole where self pity, even repulsion, await him. He
forms a long-standing bond with three others who've suffered similar injuries. It is a time
for them all to come to grips with their own mortality.
But Fournier is no lightweight and sets about facing his own destiny. His time in
hospital--in a special ward for soldiers with such facial injuries--serves as the basis of his
own positive perception of the world to come. It's not an easy ride for him.
The general idea for this story comes from Dugain's own grandfather, himself a
veteran of The Great War. "The Officers' Ward" was honored with France's Prix des
Libraires, and was on the short-list for the Grand Prix of the Académie Française.
Dugain's power of description and episode is a depressingly tragic view of such a
senseless war, yet these tragic elements are somehow overshadowed by the hope and the
will of the human spirit to rise above the personal pitfalls and to function positively within
the confines of a civilized society. But most importantly it is within the confines of his own
self-image that Lieutenant Fournier prevails. Dugain deserves his accolades.
(...)
Ueledavi Ueledavi
I loved the simple language used to tell this story. There was no room for superfluous words in this tale, the events and the players are profound enough. The narrator's experience recovering from wounds in Paris during WWI is filled with pain, hope, humor, loss, love, and friendship. The narrator carefully takes us through the simple, sparse moments of convalescence in the "Officer's ward" and fills them with meaning that comes from a deep gratitude for life, and from the bravery to see through the worst moments without getting lost.
Nanecele Nanecele
every once in a while, a book pops up that really succeeds in almost every way imaginable...that is, capturing the imagination, feeling empathy with/for the characters and then simply getting so involved with the story that nothing else exists except the written word...The Officers'Ward is one of these jewels...the lovely thing about it is that it may be read in one sitting and even though the story is quite tragic, there is a certain slant of optimism that keeps the story alive. a simple, elegant story...i highly recommend.
Fordg Fordg
The Officer's ward. Moved me like no other book has ever moved me before.

It is one of those books, that once you start reading it you can not put it down. I am a reader that tends to have a few books running at once and it can take me weeks to finish them. This book I read in two days.

The strength of human spirit shines in this book.

If you only read one book in your life this is the book to read. The regretful thing is, that after this book all other books pale into insignificance.
FLIDER FLIDER
This book is a perfect little gem.
A book complete and very alive in the writing.
Bravo.Look foreward to read his second novel.This being his first, we have wonders to look foreward to.Thank you.
Good insight into the horrors of war from the wounded perspective.