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eBook The New Atlantis ePub

eBook The New Atlantis ePub

by Francis Bacon

  • ISBN: 1599867613
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Francis Bacon
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: FQ Classics (August 27, 2007)
  • Pages: 52
  • ePub book: 1725 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1579 kb
  • Other: azw docx rtf mbr
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 893

Description

New Atlantis is an incomplete utopian novel by Sir Francis Bacon, published after Mr. Bacon's death in 1626. It appeared unheralded and tucked into the back of a longer work of natural history, Sylva sylvarum (forest of materials).

New Atlantis is an incomplete utopian novel by Sir Francis Bacon, published after Mr. In New Atlantis, Bacon portrayed a vision of the future of human discovery and knowledge, expressing his aspirations and ideals for humankind.

The New Atlantis book. Unity: Francis Bacon’s take on the ideal (Christian) society, framed as a retelling of the Old Platonic Story of Atlantis. Bacon gives us an idea of a moderate theocracy that is lax towards strangers, but nonetheless ultimately isolationist. 3 Prompts: 1. How can I talk about utopia in a way that is more compelling than More? Bacon’s tale starts off as a thrilling fiction, but quickly becomes a treatise

The New Atlantis by Francis Bacon details the ideas and vision of the scientific utopia conceived by the author. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

The New Atlantis by Francis Bacon details the ideas and vision of the scientific utopia conceived by the author. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

From Ideal Commonwealths, . Collier & Son, New York. c) 1901 The Colonial Press, expired. Prepared by Kirk Crady

Фрэнсис Бэкон The New Atlantis. We sailed from Peru, (where we had continued for the space of one whole year) for China and Japan, by the South Sea; taking with us victuals for twelve months; and had good winds from the east, though soft and weak, for five months space, and more. But the wind came about, and settled in the west for many days, so as we could make little or no way, and were sometime in purpose to turn back.

The New Atlantis is at once a fable, a work of political philosophy, and a religious text The spirit of the Enlightenment is vividly captured in Francis Bacon’s unfinished fable, The New Atlantis.

The New Atlantis is at once a fable, a work of political philosophy, and a religious text. The god that it preaches on behalf of is the humanistic god of the Enlightenment- with reason, knowledge, science, and progress as its sacred value. he spirit of the Enlightenment is vividly captured in Francis Bacon’s unfinished fable, The New Atlantis. Bacon offers a vision for a society driven mainly by science and knowledge, with its only driving principle being the bettering of man’s feeble condition. To that end, Bacon redefines science as being concerned solely with the relief of man’s estate. Nicholas Bacon, born in comparatively humble circumstances, had risen to become lord keeper of the great seal. It appeared unheralded and tucked into the back of a longer work of natural history, Sylva sylvarum. Bacon was born January 22, 1561, at York House off the Strand, London, the younger of the two sons of the lord keeper, Sir Nicholas Bacon, by his second marriage. Nicholas Bacon, born in comparatively humble circumstances, had risen to become lord keeper of the great seal

THE NEW ATLANTIS We sailed from Peru, (where we had continued for the space of one whole year) for China and Japan, by the South Sea; taking with us victuals for twelve months; and had good winds from the east, though soft and weak, for five months space, and more. But then again there arose strong and great winds from the south, with a point east, which carried us up (for all that we could do) towards the north; by which.

The Wisdom of the Ancients By Francis Bacon. It is only fitting that we should launch this series with an analysis of Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis, the story that gave our journal its name and that helped give birth to the age of modern science and technology. The New Organon By Francis Bacon. The Great Instauration By Francis Bacon. In 1968 Howard B. White published Peace among the Willows, the first book-length analysis of Bacon’s New Atlantis.

The New Atlantis by Sir Francis bacon is a utopian novel written in the early 17th century. This classic book depicts the mhytical land, Bensalem, believed to be located off the western coast of the continent of America. Bacon recounts the description of a wise man on the details of their system of expiermentation and method of recognition of inventions and their inventors. This is key work on the idea of an Atlantis and is a popular work by one of the most important English writers. This title should be read by those interested in beliefs of Atlantis, and those who are fans of the writings of Francis Bacon

Comments

Runeshaper Runeshaper
This is one of the rare classics that make you shake your head in disbelief, wondering why on earth anyone would consider it profound, or even reasonable. There are hundreds of works in the same genre that I would recommend before this one; in fact, I'd rather recommend a good nap.

P.S. It does not help that this edition has typos, including one on the front cover. Just click on the image, it reads "Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626) wrote New Atlantis around 1632".
Billy Granson Billy Granson
Anything Francis Bacon writes is fascinating. The New Atlantis is actually a description of what we are now living in. Bacon describes this quite clearly in this writing of a journey he takes. Well worth the time to read the content. Bacon's style captures a descriptive element that shows he had a far reaching insight into the future. He lived in the sixteenth century and could see the twenty-first century.
Whitebinder Whitebinder
My expectations were low for the Kindle version of Francis Bacon's "The New Atlantis"--it was free after all--but there is a reason this utopian tale is still in print almost 400 years after it was first published. Bacon offers a compelling look at how religion and science can build a strong society. While "New Atlantis" is perhaps not the best introduction to Bacon and his thinking, it is very accessible to modern day readers, most of whom will be able to follow a fictional sailor's account of his encounter with the fictional island of Bensalem. The text is very readable though a bit large in the Kindle edition.
Ttexav Ttexav
This is a very short text: 85pp for the two pieces, plus an intro. Each piece gives a brief description of one thinker's ideal world, a Utopia of a sort. This book is strengthened by presenting two such different views, casting them into sharp contrast.

The first, by Bacon, makes much of pomp, ceremony, and fine accoutrements. He starts by describing the wonderful pageant put out for any man whose living descendants exceed thirty in number. He is paraded among and served by his issue, and granted gifts by the benevolent ruler. At this point - only at this point - is a woman of the realm mentioned. His wife, should she have survived such a feat of childbearing, is to be presented as well, in a carriage, tightly enclosed. A featureless box, the best to which a woman might aspire. (Bacon goes out of his way to disparage More's Utopia, in an amusing aside.)

The remainder of the story details the alchemical feats and workshops of the land. They interested Bacon much the way a candy store might interest a child, with no thought as to how they might be provisioned or staffed. Although the many labs are of interest to today's technologist, the country's means of feeding itself and its voracious researchers remains unsaid.

Campanella's "City of the Sun" is a Utopia of very different character. Above all, it focusses its energies on war more than any other city since Sparta. He demands training in arms for men and women both from the earliest age on, though women would enter combat only in final resort. Even the infirm are put to service however they may serve: the lame can watch and guard, the blind can work in some crafts, and so on. Women are expected to participate in industry, too, except in the woodworkers' and armorers' trades. This city is surprisingly free in religion - Jews are tolerated, if not too jewish, as well as Brahmins and others who acknowledge a soul. Hey, in those days, it was radical.

Both authors express ideas that repulse a modern mind. Even Campanella's enlightened treatment of women and religious minorities sounds brutal, until considered in the context of his time. Bacon's blinkered self-involvement would barely be worth a chuckle, until one considers his influence on history.

It's not formal, but it's a way to view history: what is it that each age most wanted itself to be? What views existed, and what views have survived? And how did the writers of each age differ from the man in the street, or more likely the man behind the plow?

//wiredwierd
Eng.Men Eng.Men
A great short story read, especially for any Freemason
Ishnsius Ishnsius
I know this is a classic, but, oh my, it was quite a chore to get through. I love other, scholastic works by the esteemed Lord Bacon, but this one was too much for me in it's religiosity, and convoluted story-telling style. It's very short, so I pressed ahead to finish it just so I could say I was committed to do so. Recommended only for the staunchest Bacon fan.