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eBook The World We Found: A Novel ePub

eBook The World We Found: A Novel ePub

by Thrity Umrigar

  • ISBN: 0061938351
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Thrity Umrigar
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; 38066th edition (July 31, 2012)
  • Pages: 336
  • ePub book: 1564 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1597 kb
  • Other: mbr mobi docx doc
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 547

Description

The World We Found is stunning in its credibility and nuance. A storyteller through and through, Umrigar ensures that her characters face up to the costs and consequences created by their choices, right or wrong, principled or unprincipled.

The World We Found is stunning in its credibility and nuance. This is a novel that rewards reading, and even re-reading. Wise and absorbing, Umrigar’s novel has the rich, chaotic vibrancy of a Mumbai marketplace. Asparkling and sharp slice of life. Nina Sankovitch, Huffington Post). The World We Found is absorbing and resonant. Cleveland Plain Dealer).

The Secrets Between Us. Everybody's Son: A Novel. When I Carried You In My Belly. I write to make sense of the world and to make sense of my own, often contradictory emotions and feelings. The Weight of Heaven. There is a line in my first novel, Bombay Time, where a character thinks, Some days he felt as if his head were a globe. all of history distilled into his own life. I probe my own life-with all its dents and bruises and its moments of grace and beauty-to understand the human condition.

The World We Found book. Thrity Umrigar - image from The Daily at Case Western Reserve. Decades passed and their lives changed.

Электронная книга "The World We Found: A Novel", Thrity Umrigar. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The World We Found: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The World We Found: A Novel. Fans of Jennifer Haigh’s Faith, Jhumpa Lahiri’s Interpreter of Maladies, and Katrina Kittle’s The Kindness of Strangers will be captivated by Umrigar’s The World We Found-a moving story of bottled secrets, unfulfilled dreams, and the acceptance that can still lead to redemption, from a writer whom the New York Times calls perceptive and often piercing.

Thrity Umrigar is the author of seven novels Everybody’s Son, The Story Hour, The World We Found, The Weight of Heaven, The Space Between Us, If Today Be Sweet, and Bombay Time; a memoir, First Darling of the Morning; and a children’s picture book, When I Carried You in My Belly. A former journalist, she was awarded a Nieman Fellowship to Harvard and was a finalist for the PEN Beyond Margins Award.

2013 - Lambda Literary Award in the Lesbian General Fiction category for her novel, The World We Found.

Indian and Parsi author. Umrigar was born in Mumbai, India to a Parsi family, and relocated to the United States at the age of 2. .Umrigar received a Bachelor of Science from Bombay University, an . From Ohio State University, and a P. 2013 - Lambda Literary Award in the Lesbian General Fiction category for her novel, The World We Found. "Bookslut - An Interview with Thrity Umrigar". Retrieved 19 December 2018.

As in all her novels, Umrigar is a beautiful genius at presenting the intimate side of large-scale (and widely accepted) . Umrigar’s four women are reuniting in this found world and discovering the truth behind its beauty: that it is the people in their world that matter most of all.

As in all her novels, Umrigar is a beautiful genius at presenting the intimate side of large-scale (and widely accepted) practices of discrimination and bigotry. In this novel, she turns her focus to religion and to the scorn - and much, much worse, as in the mass murders and beatings in Bombay in 1993 and at Gujarat in 2002 - heaped on the Muslim population of India.

Thrity Umrigar, acclaimed author of The Space Between Us and The Weight of Heaven, returns with a breathtaking new novel—a skillfully wrought, emotionally resonant story of four women and the indelible friendship they share. Fans of Jennifer Haigh’s Faith, Jhumpa Lahiri’s Interpreter of Maladies, and Katrina Kittle’s The Kindness of Strangers will be captivated by Umrigar’s The World We Found—a moving story of bottled secrets, unfulfilled dreams, and the acceptance that can still lead to redemption, from a writer whom the New York Times calls “perceptive and often piercing.”

Comments

Mavegar Mavegar
This was a very enjoyable read, less a study of Indian culture as such than a character study of four very interesting women and the way that events and their individual psychologies affected their life-long friendship. Of course, events did play a role, and a major theme is the political idealism they shared in their youth and the impact that had on their later lives. Ironically, the idealism that led one character to marry outside of her family's religious culture left her isolated and trapped in a repressive marriage to a fundamentalist Muslim. Another character felt the need to hide her sexual identity and a traumatic episode from her closest friends. These are women whose lives don't require "translation" for women from Western cultures, especially feminists. There is not the same "remove" that one sometimes feels for novels more embedded in traditional Indian culture (which I also, however, enjoy). I felt that I could relate to their experiences of faded idealism and life experiences very directly. I did wish that the novel had not ended so abruptly. I would have liked to stay with the characters a little longer as they finally reached the final member of this foursome of older and life-tempered women and restored their former intimacy.
Morlurne Morlurne
I love Thrity Umrigar's writing. So perceptive, rich in character and place and full of depth and personal and social insites. The characters and motivations in The World We Found are not as well developed and as those of The Story Hour or The Space Between Us-- which really captivated and impressed me-- but it's a worthwhile read nevertheless. I especially appreciate the experience I had in feeling how it might be to wear a burka. Also, I didn't mind the unresolved ending this time either. I definitely would recommend this book, as I would any and all of Umrigar's books, even those I haven't read yet. That's how impressed I am with her story telling
Pryl Pryl
Umrigar's beautiful sentences bring a bustling India to life. The novel starts out in America, though, where Armitai is dying of a brain tumor. She finds herself wishing to say goodbye to her almost-sisters, the girls with whom she went to college thirty years ago. It's as if she must say goodbye to her own truest, deepest self. The idealism and dreams of youth have changed for all four women, and the two men who went to college with them. How do we build our lives amidst tragedies and betrayals, small and large? What is it that brings us joy? Does love last? The title references the adult world they found outside of college, and yet the story makes clear in luminous compassion--it's the world we choose, as well.
Memuro Memuro
Having just returned from a trip to India with my daughter, this book brought back a lot of memories. The people were wonderful and everything about India we enjoyed. You don't "go" to India, you "experience" it. I LOVED this book from the beginning. I usually only read during my commute to and from work on the train but found I couldn't put it down. From the beginning the book touched me and I had to close it and take a deep breath. All her characters seemed real so I didn't feel like I was reading a book, but rather watching people in their day-to-day living as Ms. Umrigar goes into depth describing their feelings. I enjoyed her flowery language such as when she refers to the "lovely things" which are the little things in life that we all take for granted. She portrays incredibly well the intense dislike of Muslims by many ever since the horror of 911 and how people discriminate against groups, regardless of what type of person an individual is. The end is a total nail-biter, as I held my breath, but I don't want to give anything away, so I'm limiting what I say other than this is a must-read, not only for anyone who has an interest in the Indian culture but for everyone.
Ariseym Ariseym
I love this author! She writes so beautifully that I can see, feel and inhabit the characters. She brings India alive...I can smell it and hear it and taste it. This story was especially moving for me because it was about four friends who were close in college in the 1970s trying to reconnect in middle age. Like many of us, their lives, values and attitudes have changed and some have taken radically different paths, culturally, politically, spiritually. It's how they reconnect and eventually recapture the joy of their friendship despite the changes and differences. Evocative and just amazing work.
Getaianne Getaianne
I just finished reading this book and loved it!

This book follows the lives of four girls who were best friends growing up in India; and who were fellow revolutionists at Bombay College in the 1970's.

Now. thirty years later they hear from Armaiti. She is the only one of the group who is no longer in India. Armaiti is married and living in America. She has been diagnosed with cancer and wants to see her old friends once more before it is too late!

The character development, the insights into the Hindu-Muslim War in 1993, and the varied paths of each of these women kept me fascinated.

The suspense at the end kept me turning pages and ignoring my dryer buzzer!! Thrity Umrigar is a powerful, exquisite writer. I highly recommend this book!