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eBook The Lost Stradivarius ePub

eBook The Lost Stradivarius ePub

by John Meade Falkner

  • ISBN: 0854682201
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: John Meade Falkner
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Imprint unknown; New edition edition (August 1972)
  • Pages: 296
  • ePub book: 1449 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1856 kb
  • Other: rtf docx lit mbr
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 627

Description

Читай онлайн книгу The Lost Stradivarius, John Meade Falkner . Apart from The Lost Stradivarius, Falkner was the author of two other novels, The Nebuly Coat (1903-also published in Penguin Books) and Moonfleet (1898).

Читай онлайн книгу The Lost Stradivarius, John Meade Falkner на сайте или через приложение ЛитРес Читай. He also wrote a History of Oxfordshire, handbooks to that county and to Berkshire, historical short stories, and some mediævalist verse. Letter from MISS SOPHIA MALTRAVERS to her Nephew, SIR EDWARD MALTRAVERS, then a Student at Christ Church, Oxford.

John Meade Falkner was a remarkable character, as he was not only a scholar and a writer, but a. .

John Meade Falkner was a remarkable character, as he was not only a scholar and a writer, but a captain of industry as well. Born in 1858, the son of a clergyman in Wiltshire, he was educated at Marlborough and Hertford College, Oxford.

The Lost Stradivarius (1895), by J. Meade Falkner, is a short novel of ghosts and the evil that can be invested in an object, in this case an extremely fine Stradivarius violin. After finding the violin of the title in a hidden compartment in his college rooms, the protagonist, a wealthy young heir, becomes increasingly secretive as well as obsessed by a particular piece of music, which seems to have the power to call up the ghost of the violin's previous owner

The lost stradivarius. by. J. meade falkner.

The lost stradivarius. Penguin Books Harmondsworth Middlesex, England 245 Fifth Avenue, New York, . John Meade Falkner was a remarkable character, as he was not only a scholar and a writer, but a captain of industry as well. Born in 1858, the son of a clergyman in Wiltshire, he was educated at Marlborough and Hertford College, Oxford

Title: The Lost Stradivarius. Author: John Meade Falkner. John Meade Falkner was a remarkable character, as he was not only a scholar and a writer, but a captain of industry as well

Title: The Lost Stradivarius. Release Date: November 21, 2004. Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1. On leaving the university, he became tutor to the sons of Sir Andrew Noble, then vice-chairman of the Armstrong-Whitworth Company; and his ability so much impressed his employer that in 1885 he was offered a post in the firm.

Meade Falkner is somewhat of a cult figure amongst a small group of Victorian fiction aficionados. The book isn't bad, per se, but it's absolutely typical for its genre, and somewhat run-of-the-mill. The novella is a classic Victorian ghost story, detailing the obsession and gradual madness of a young student with the titular violin. There's not a lot more to it than that, and fans of the genre will be immediately familiar with this type of ghost story

Read online books written by John Meade Falkner in our e-reader absolutely for free. Books by John Meade Falkner: The Lost Stradivarius. The Lost Stradivarius.

Read online books written by John Meade Falkner in our e-reader absolutely for free. Author of The Lost Stradivarius at ReadAnyBook. One fee. Stacks of books.

The Lost Stradivarius English poet and novelist J. Meade Falkner is best remembered for his novel, Moonfleet. Chilling in the extreme, The Lost Stradivarius is a classic tale of the supernatural. While practicing in his rooms in Oxford, gifted violinist John Maltravers notices a strange phenomenon: whenever a certain air is played, a mysterious presence seems to enter. Unable to rationalize this away, Maltravers becomes increasingly unsettled, until he makes a startling discovery-tucked away in a hidden cupboard in his room is a priceless Stradivarius. English poet and novelist J.

Comments

Alien Alien
Read this book in one afternoon sitting, really enthalled with story line. Imagine relatives and an adult friend telling you about the Father you never met. Hard to imagine this author only wrote 3 books for publication but given all of the other things he accomplished in his life it is understandable. Meant to excell at everything he set his hand and mind to accomplish and did so! You will have to work through turn of the century phrases and terms but then that is the case with any book from this era. In addition to everything else it was FREE! I am older (66) so might appreciate this more than younger generation but will meet all the desires of any avid reader.
Doukasa Doukasa
Written in 1895, The Lost Stradivarius employs the elegant language of the nobles of that era. Combining an English ghost story and a valuable artifact discovered, it portrays the excitement of both and also a warnings. Unearned and accidental wealth will change the person receiving whatever that wealth is ascribed to. Usually that change is not for the better. Great read.
Waiso Waiso
This story of a haunted young man plays out in 19th Century England, told as a retrospective through the eyes of a sister and a dear friend. The story is written in a somewhat antiquated manner, but not so much that it is hard to understand or follow. It lost a star because there were some loose ends / continuity questions left hanging. Such a shame he never wrote a sequel to tie up those loose ends.
greatest greatest
I really enjoyed this book, especially the spooky atmosphere, the downward spiral of our main character, the refreshingly unique story - along with wonderful editing, correct spelling and such a fine use of the language... this one's a keeper in my collection.
Mohn Mohn
TRIPLE EXCELLENT!!!
Maridor Maridor
J. Meade Falkner is somewhat of a cult figure amongst a small group of Victorian fiction aficionados. Unfortunately, the Lost Stradivarius is not the best place to start in order to get a sense of why Falkner is so revered. The book isn't bad, per se, but it's absolutely typical for its genre, and somewhat run-of-the-mill.

The novella is a classic Victorian ghost story, detailing the obsession and gradual madness of a young student with the titular violin. There's not a lot more to it than that, and fans of the genre will be immediately familiar with this type of ghost story.

Sadly, the book rarely rises above average. Falkner's prose is fine, but his narrator is the protagonist's somewhat starchy and naive sister, so we never get the chance to enter the subjective horror on display, and end up frustratingly ignorant as to the most interesting aspects of the haunting. Her voice also grates after a while.

Other than a strong repulsion/fascination with catholicism, which is portrayed as little better than an orgiastic pagan cult at times, there's not much that stands out to this book beyond the general quality of the Hesperus edition, printed on high quality paper with good binding.

If you are interested in Victorian tales of obsession there are far better stories to be had in the various ghost anthologies floating about. In particular, Oliver Onions' The Beckoning Fair One basically accomplishes everything this tale sets out to, in a far more eerie and interesting fashion.
Agantrius Agantrius
John Meade Falkner did not seem to consider novel-writing the most important thing in his life; he wrote three novels in a matter of less than ten years, and spend the rest of his life as an antiquarian, a librarian, and the top executive of a major munitions manufacturing firm. But the three Gothic novels he wrote are all one of a kind and were written with an incredible sense of surety and deftness. THE LOST STRADIVARIUS is a beautifully constructed ghost story, concerning a Victorian Oxford student and music aficionado who discovers an eighteenth-century Italian musical suite; when he plays a certain section of it with his friend in his rooms in Magdalen Hall, a presence seems to stir around them. This only starts the tale, which manages to synthesize a fantastic array of fin-de-siecle concerns, including homoeroticism (as Tom Paulin suggests in his brief foreword to this nice little Hesperus edition, the figure of Oscar Wilde surely haunts this work as much as the fictional ghost of Adrian Temple), decadence, anti-Catholicism, and Paterian aestheticism. The great pleasures of Falkner's fiction are his striking ability to convey atmosphere and his precocious gift for showing and not telling when it comes to character and suspense.
The ghost story is by & large ideally realized as a short story or at most novella -- the greatest masters, such as M. R. James, never even attempted the novel form; & those who did both short stories and novels, such as E. F. Benson, only the short stories are of outstanding merit. At novel length they tend to bog down considerably or else descend into tedious gothicisms & inessential asides. But Falkner's THE LOST STRADIVARIUS is a perfect gem of a novel, a timeless tale of weird & awe inspiring ghostliness, easily in the top ten of Victorian ghost novels, in an unfailingly elegant style.
-Jessica Amanda Salmonson, Violet Books