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eBook Goshawk Squadron ePub

eBook Goshawk Squadron ePub

by Derek Robinson

  • ISBN: 0330235931
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Derek Robinson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Pan, UK; New Edition edition (1973)
  • Pages: 222
  • ePub book: 1706 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1344 kb
  • Other: lrf azw mbr lit
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 215

Description

Praise for Goshawk Squadron A bleak and savage book, full of the terror of warfare and shot through with grim . Praise for Derek Robinson. Robinso. hould be mentioned in the same breath as Mailer, Ballard or Heller.

Praise for Goshawk Squadron A bleak and savage book, full of the terror of warfare and shot through with grim humor; a sort of First-World-War Catch 22. Nicholas Lezard, Guardian One. Bleak, black humor, intelligence, moral depth and high adventure. Robinson writes with tireless enthusiasm which never sacrifices detail to pace, or vice vers. errific. DEREK ROBINSON is a policeman’s son from a council estate who crossed the class barrier by going to Cambridge, where he got a degree in history and learned to write badly.

Derek Robinson wrote Goshawk Squadron in 1971 and began his depiction of squadron life in the Royal Flying Corps (later Royal Air Force)

Derek Robinson wrote Goshawk Squadron in 1971 and began his depiction of squadron life in the Royal Flying Corps (later Royal Air Force). Unlike his later novels that focused on the fictional "Hornet" squadron, this first effort focused on the "Goshawk" squadron, but the method and characters are essentially similar. The main protagonist in Goshawk Squadron is the unit commander, Major Stanley Woolley.

But this is the version for adults. Apparently most of the literature in the UK about that early air war romanticized the pilots and the fighting conditions. Goshawk Squadron continues with the theme of technical accuracy and like the previous books bases some of the escapades on actual events, with history suitably bent as to time, place and person. So don't rely on any of these books as history, but enjoy them for what they are; excellent historical novels of WW1 aviation.

Goshawk Squadron book. These are some of the last lines in the Afterword of Derek Robinson’s novel Goshawk Squadron, yet they perfectly sum up the entire book. World War One aviators were more than just soldiers they were the. In the final year of World War I, the British sent young men into the skies in constructs of polished wood, stretched canvas, and piano wire. Loaded with fuel and equipped with guns, these biplanes were used for observation, attack, and defense.

As well as individual flying skills, he drilled them in the routines for reconnaissance, escort duty, balloon attacks, low-level infantry support, and artillery observation. sively; there were no easy days. He never congratulated; he frequently denounced. Not to be damned by Woolley was as near praise as anyone would ever get. He demanded tight formation flying, so there was a constant risk of collision, which meant that everyone was living on his nerves. Flying with the old man, Rogers said one day, is like living with a maniac

Derek Robinson (born 12 April 1932) is a British author best known for his military aviation novels full of black humour. He has also written several books on some of the more sordid events in the history of Bristol, his home town, as well as guides.

Derek Robinson (born 12 April 1932) is a British author best known for his military aviation novels full of black humour. He has also written several books on some of the more sordid events in the history of Bristol, his home town, as well as guides to rugby. He was nominated for the Booker Prize in 1971 for his first novel, Goshawk Squadron. After attending Cotham Grammar School, Robinson served in the Royal Air Force as a fighter plotter, during his National Service.

Derek Robinson Derek Robinson

Spy thrillers usually leave me cold but this one is plainly outstanding in IT's class' guardian. Eldorado: million dollar spy 1941. Goshawk Squadron finds its gallows humor and black camaraderie no defense against a Spandau bullet to the back of the head. From the Phoney War of 1939 to the Battle of Britain in 1940, the pilots of Hornet Squadron learn their lessons the hard way. Hi-jinks are all very well on the ground, but once in a Hurricane's cockpit, the best killers keep their wits close.

Set during the height of World War I in January 1918, Goshawk Squadron follows the misfortunes of a British flight squadron on the Western Front. For Stanley Woolley, commanding offices of Goshawk Squadron, the romance of chivalry in the clouds is just a myth. So, he drums into his men a simple and savage code: shoot the enemy in the back before he knows you're there.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Goshawk Squadron by Derek Robinson (Paperback, 1973) at the best online prices . Title: Goshawk Squadron Item Condition: used item in a very good condition. Read full description. See details and exclusions

Title: Goshawk Squadron Item Condition: used item in a very good condition. See details and exclusions.

Set during the height of World War I in January 1918, Goshawk Squadron follows the misfortunes of a British flight squadron on the Western Front. For Stanley Woolley, commanding officer of Goshawk Squadron, the romance of chivalry in the clouds is just a myth. The code he drums into his men is simple and savage: shoot the enemy in the back before he knows you're there. Even so, he believes the whole squadron will be dead within three months. A monumental work at the time of its original release, Booker-shortlisted Goshawk Squadron is now viewed as a classic in the mode of Catch 22. Wry, brutal, cynical and hilarious, the men of Robinson's squadron are themselves an embodiment of the maddening contradictions of war: as much a refined troop of British gentleman as they are a viscous band of brothers hell-bent on staying alive and winning the war.

Comments

Wenyost Wenyost
“Goshawk Squadron” is a novel by author Derek Robinson about a fictional squadron of the Royal Flying Corps (the predecessors of the Royal Air Force) in early 1918, during World War I. But rather than this being a story about happy young men fighting a chivalrous war in the air against other similarly chivalrous young men, this novel shows what it was really like … a brutal, unsympathetic struggle where the pilots from both sides strove to ambush and kill their adversary before said adversary even knew he was there. I don’t give spoilers in my reviews of fictional works, below are my impressions of this book.

While the book touches all of the pilots in the squadron, it centers around the young, bitterly cynical commander, Major Woolley. Robinson shows him as an eccentric, yet harshly effective commander, who is close to coming apart from the stress of his position. The author gives interesting portraits of the replacement pilots coming into the squadron … young idealist men, who have no idea how the reality of the air war compares to the popularly idealized, sanitized version that they believed, and their gradual disillusionment delivered courtesy of Major Woolley. Robinson writes in a darkly humorous way, that accurately describes the struggles both on the ground and in the air (although the air combat often becomes horrifying).

A few years ago, I read “Winged Victory”, a semi-autobiographical novel by RFC pilot V.M. Yeates about the air war in France in 1918 flying Sopwith Camels. Mr Yeates based his novel on his own experiences in the Royal Flying Corps in 1918, and the novel was widely acclaimed as being an authentic description of what it was actually like to live and fly in combat during World War I. Although unlike Yeates, Robinsion obviously did not fly/fight aircraft in World War I, to me, “Goshawk Squadron” has the same ring of authenticity that I had when reading “Winged Victory”. I highly recommend this book. Five stars.
Shalizel Shalizel
Derek Robinson wrote Goshawk Squadron in 1971 and began his depiction of squadron life in the Royal Flying Corps (later Royal Air Force). Unlike his later novels that focused on the fictional "Hornet" squadron, this first effort focused on the "Goshawk" squadron, but the method and characters are essentially similar. The main protagonist in Goshawk Squadron is the unit commander, Major Stanley Woolley. This character is clearly defined as an anti-hero, indeed his behavior and methods may appear repugnant or even borderline insane. However, Robinson succeeds in developing an odd pathos behind Woolley and over the course of the novel the reader should gain understanding of the forces that drive this odd character, if not empathy for him. Modern-day military officers might benefit from studying the command methods of Woolley, particularly in preparing units for combat. Overall, Goshawk Squadron is a true classic that delivers vivid characters and action that draws the reader further and further into the realities of air combat in the First World War.
Goshawk Squadron is set in the period January-March 1918, just before the German spring offensives. The squadron is equipped with the SE-5a fighter and begins the novel resting and re-building behind the lines. Woolley has been commander of the squadron for one year and although fanatical in his training methods, he is approaching combat burnout. Indeed, Woolley is so cynical (but realistic, as it turns out) that he believes all his pilots will be dead within three months. In a seemingly futile but rabid effort, Woolley spends the brief period behind the lines to train his squadron to be the most cold-blooded and efficient killers possible. Woolley's combat ethics clearly clash with the English public school morals of his young pilots; Woolley bans words like "sporting," or "fair fight" from his squadron. In these pages, Robinson depicts how four years of harsh, non-stop combat have produced a killer elite in men like Woolley, whose only philosophy is "kill or be killed." To modern eyes, Woolley's training methods will seem callous and cruel, resulting in needless pain and suffering on his pilots. Indeed, Woolley terrorizes his pilots, to include throwing beer bottles and shooting at slow learners. The pilots in Goshawk Squadron hate their commander, but they are also better prepared to survive when they return to operational service. When the great German offensive begins in March 1918, Goshawk Squadron is committed to try and stem the German onslaught as the British front line crumbles. Robinson provides excellent detail both on balloon-busting and close air support attacks, circa 1918.
Woolley does begin to evolve over the course of the novel, as do his pilots. Yet Goshawk Squadron is never a happy unit and modern military readers might question whether the increase in unit efficiency is worth the drop in morale. Woolley makes better killers, but the squadron is visibly falling apart by the end of the novel. Can a combat unit really function for long based merely on fear of the commander? And what is the result when that long-punishing tyrant suddenly decides to ease up on his troops? These questions are never fully addressed by Robinson, but remain lurking in the corners. On the other hand, one of the great scenes in the novel is a confrontation between Woolley and a REMF colonel from headquarters. Unlike other military novels that attempt to portray the clash between the war fighter and rear echelon types, there is no effort toward subterfuge by Woolley. Instead, Woolley starts blasting away at the colonel with his pistol until he wins the argument ("You can't kill me," says the colonel. "I will kill you, take your body up in my plane, and dump it behind German lines," says Woolley. In a war where thousands disappeared without a trace, this is a convincing threat.). Robinson's point here is that it is difficult to threaten a man with theoretical punitive actions when he is facing the very real threat of death in combat on a daily basis. Advice to REMFs: don't go to the front line in a war and threaten combat soldiers with administrative actions, if you do, wear a flak jacket.
Cetnan Cetnan
_Goshawk Squadron_ tells the story of a WWI squadron of pilots in the winter and spring of 1918. Robinson is ruthless in the treatment of his characters, tragic death following tragic death as both replacements and old hands fall from the sky as part of the randomness and unpredictability of war. This, and Robinson's portrayal of daily life within the squadron are its strong points. Each character struggles to cope with the stress and uncertainty of their job, compounded by the hard and heavy-handed leadership of the protagonist, Major Woolley - an anti-hero whose training methods are unconventional but effective.

Perhaps it is because the book is over thirty-years old, but many of the characters have become cliched: Woolley, for example is seen in film again and again (from the Dirty Dozen to the Die-Hard franchise); even some of the pilots are stereotypical (the fire-and-brimstone son of missionaries, the simple country bumpkin, the blue-blooded aristocrat unaccustomed to being treated with disdain and disrespect by the stern, common-man commanding officer ...) I also had difficulty keeping track of characters - partially because so many of them arrived to the squadron before they were killed, but partially because in only a few instances was there any remarkable feature that made them memorable or distinguishable from the others. This, of course, could be intentional, as Woolley himself doesn't expect any of them to live beyond the next three months.

Even with these shortcomings, though, I give the book four stars. Through Wooley, Robinson strips the veneer of "honor", "fairplay" and "sportsmanship" from combat, instead emphasizing what war really is: cold-blooded killing in as quick and efficient a manner as possible. He also shows the helplessness men underfire feel, and his descriptions of aerial combat are among the best I've read.