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eBook The Nightmare Factory ePub

eBook The Nightmare Factory ePub

by Thomas Ligotti

  • ISBN: 1854874365
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Thomas Ligotti
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Robinson Publishing (July 15, 1996)
  • Pages: 544
  • ePub book: 1734 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1269 kb
  • Other: docx azw lrf doc
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 204

Description

Thomas Ligotti was born in 1953 in Detroit, Michigan.

Thomas Ligotti was born in 1953 in Detroit, Michigan. His work has appeared regularly in a host of horror and fantasy magazines, earning him high esteem from followers of weird and macabre fiction everywhere.

Thomas Ligotti is the most interesting thing happening in all the books currently on my shelf (besides the ever-fascinating Osho). However, I don't detect perfection as far as a writer of pure horror or terror. He's not as scary, for instance, as early Stephen King (who is?). But he's soooo damned beautiful in his words, his economy, his expression of things you always wondered if anyone else ever dared consider in whatever dark proclivities your mind possesses. But it's sometimes ineffable, and you.

The Nightmare Factory is a 2007 comics anthology from Fox Atomic Comics adapting individual short stories by Thomas Ligotti

The Nightmare Factory is a 2007 comics anthology from Fox Atomic Comics adapting individual short stories by Thomas Ligotti. The second book in the series, The Nightmare Factory – Volume 2, was published in September 2008. It features new short essays by Ligotti. The Last Feast of Harlequin (Stuart Moore & Colleen Doran). Dream of a Mannikin (Stuart Moore & Ben Templesmith). Dr. Locrian's Asylum (Joe Harris & Ted McKeever). Teatro Grottesco (Joe Harris & Michael Gaydos).

And only this condition of vicious insight allows us a full grasp of the world, all things considered, just as a frigid melancholy grants us full possession of ourselves. in the heart of horror

And only this condition of vicious insight allows us a full grasp of the world, all things considered, just as a frigid melancholy grants us full possession of ourselves. in the heart of horror

The Nightmare Factory book. In the realm of the supernatural, Thomas Ligotti is the master of stylish, eerie writing of the highest quality.

The Nightmare Factory book. Contents: The Frolic (1982) Les Fleurs (1981) Alice's Last Adventure (1985) Dream of a Mannikin (1982) The Chymist (1981) Drink to Me In the realm of the supernatural, Thomas Ligotti is the master of stylish, eerie writing of the highest quality.

UGC Certified Member. Thomas Ligotti -The Nightmare Factory. The Nightmare Factory’ is a comic book based on four Ligotti’s short stories. Each short story has been adapted into a comic by a different graphic artist. As far as the stories are concerned, they don’t

UGC Certified Member. As far as the stories are concerned, they don’t. loose any of spooky charm and peculioar character. Moreover, the graphics is really cool. It seems that all the artists have gone to any lengths to convey the atmosphere of permeating menace which you can easily find in Ligotti’s stories.

Thomas Ligotti is the author of Noctuary, Grimscribe and Songs of a Dead Dreamer Additional Product Features. The Secret Commonwealth: The Book of Dust Volume Two by Philip Pullman (2019, Hardback).

Thomas Ligotti is the author of Noctuary, Grimscribe and Songs of a Dead Dreamer. Additional Product Features. Place of Publication.

The Nightmare Factory. by Thomas Ligotti, Stuart Moore, Joe Harris. Enter the universe of renowned horror master Thomas Ligotti-a universe where clowns take part in a sinister winter festival, a scheming girlfriend makes reality itself come unraveled, a crumbling asylum's destruction unleashes a greater horror, and a mysterious Teatro comes and goes, leaving only shattered dreams in its wake.

Thomas Ligotti (born July 9, 1953) is a contemporary American horror writer. His writings have been noted as being rooted in several literary genres – most prominently weird fiction – and have overall been described by many critics as works of philosophical horror, often formed into short stories and novellas in the tradition of gothic fiction. The worldview espoused by Ligotti in his fiction and non-fiction is pessimistic and nihilistic

Comments

Nagor Nagor
It's a shame that this is out of print, because this is the longest and most comprehensive Ligotti volume in existence, to my knowledge. Ligotti is one of my favorite short story writers, in any genre, and this collection has almost all of my favorite Ligotti stories, such as The Frolic, Drink to Me Only with Labyrinthine Eyes, Vastarien, Nethescurial, The Shadow at the Bottom of the World, The Medusa, Mrs Rinaldi's Angel, The Tsalal, Teatro Grottesco, Gas Station Carnivals, The Bungalow House and The Red Tower. And believe it or not, it was hard for me to come up with a list that short- The Nightmare Factory has several classics which reveal Ligotti's dreary view of existence in stunning prose.
In a nutshell, it contains the vast majority of the stories in his first three collections, Songs of a Dead Dreamer, Grimscribe and Noctuary, as well as six stories that would later be published in Teatro Grottesco.

For those interested, here is a more detailed explanation of what this contains and doesn't contain, by volume:
Songs of a Dead Dreamer- This section includes the contents of the original 1985 publication of the book, and so doesn't include the stories Notes on the Writing of Horror: A Story or Professor Nobody's Little Lectures on Supernatural horror which have been added to later additions. These are both available in the Penguin Classics omnibus.
Grimscribe- The story lineup is the same, but I've noticed that some are slightly different in the Penguin Classics volume, which was published later. The Flowers of the Abyss, for example, has a slightly different ending in the two volumes. I'm not sure when these changes were made.
Noctuary- Noctuary is split into three sections in the original publication, and this includes the first two of the three. However, about one fourth of Noctuary was made up of a third section called Notebook of the Night, which includes several two to four page stories that are not included in The Nightmare Factory. If you want to read these you'll have to hunt down a copy of Noctuary.
Teatro Grottesco- The volume contains six stories that are all now available in Teatro Grottesco.
Xor Xor
Thomas Ligotti is the most interesting thing happening in all the books currently on my shelf (besides the ever-fascinating Osho). I'm absorbed. However, I don't detect perfection as far as a writer of pure horror or terror. He's not as scary, for instance, as early Stephen King (who is?). But he's soooo damned beautiful in his words, his economy, his expression of things you always wondered if anyone else ever dared consider in whatever dark proclivities your mind possesses. The stuff will scare you if you meditate upon it, sure. But it's sometimes ineffable, and you can't wait to see what he tackles in the next tale. I will have to read many stories again, for sometimes the endings leave me with a slight letdown. Then you realize that, no, you didn't miss anything in the story, you're just not used to letting things sink in. Ligotti send reflections of fear down the corridors of a mind that likes to reflect. You get to play in those corridors if you have this fantastic book. It's intellectual meat-and-potatoes almost posing as mind-candy. You feel the creep not so much through the plots as through the strange circumstances and bizarre images and unspeakable implications. No, he doesn't *go* for the scare, just for the next best thing: He makes you think.
Lilegha Lilegha
Very much in the spirit of H.P. Lovecraft, Ambrose Bierce and E.A. Poe. Ligotti paints wonderfully horrific images with words. This book contains his collected works up through it's publication. Simply a must have for anyone who enjoys horror fiction!
Ferne Ferne
A celebration of utter bleakness that becomes beautiful in the courage of its purity...imagine John Doe of the film, Seven, but with the hatred replaced by wonder. Ligotti is the best American horror writer since H.P. Lovecraft, and perhaps the best American prose poet since Poe.
Acrobat Acrobat
Eerie. That's the first word that pops to mind when thinking of Ligotti's style of writing. Like a word association test; Ligotti . . . Eerie. Ligotti has a unique style of writing. Quite rare when so many writers are trying to write "like" someone else. King, Campbell, Straub, Barker, the list of the imitated goes on. It must be admitted, however; when one reads Ligotti, one can see the pastiche of different styles. The influence of Lovecraft is particularly poignant. Indeed, "The Last Feast of Harlequin," is dedicated to Lovecraft. What one has to realize is that this is not imitation but mastery. Ligotti is not trying to write "like" someone else . . . He can write better. After reading Ligotti, one might think that he studied under Lovecraft, mastered that style, then moved onto another until he had mastered all styles he felt he needed. It is similar to how artists study under recognized masters then create their own works after finishing their apprenticeship. Ligotti is an artist unto himself, but one can tell the "styles" under which he is versed; just as one can tell the "styles" under which Remembrandt was versed.
Ligotti has a way of "bending" reality as, quite aptly, in a nightmare. More akin to Kafka, these are psychological skews in perception. But sometimes (and the scary part is that we never know whether or not the story we are reading falls into this particular "sometime") the horror is more than psychological, it is Lovecraftian. The first story in the collection, "The Frolic," is a good example of this. [STOP reading here if you do not want to know what happened in the story.] Is the prisonner simply an insane murderer or is he a being from a different plane of reality, a demon dimension bordering ours? Either way you look at the story, psychological (the killer is a psychopath) or supernatural (the killer is a demon from another dimension) you are hit with horror. The only difference is the difference between being hit with a 50 foot tidal wave or a 150 foot tidal wave. [RECOMMENCE reading now.]
Ligotti is not a complex writer; he is a sophisticated writer. A complex writer presents many parts, all of which may not go together. A sophisticated writer presents many parts, ALL of which serve an important purpose, like a well played chess match (or the engine block of a 65 Mustang). Ligotti has been indicted with being too ambiguous, too vague, in his writing. But the beauty of Ligotti's writing is that it is open to multiple interpretations. This is the reason for the confusion. His writing is not ambiguous, it is multifaceted. It is highly sophisticated with amazing prose, and I only hope that, unlike his Providence predecessor, Ligotti will not have to wait until after his death to receive the recognition he deserves as a truly original, truly eerie, voice in horror literature.