cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Cairo Modern
eBook Cairo Modern ePub

eBook Cairo Modern ePub

by Naguib Mahfouz,William M. Hutchins

  • ISBN: 0307473538
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Naguib Mahfouz,William M. Hutchins
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Anchor; Reprint edition (December 1, 2009)
  • Pages: 243
  • ePub book: 1502 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1131 kb
  • Other: doc azw rtf lrf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 342

Description

William M. Hutchins is the principal translator of Naguib Mahfouz’s Cairo Trilogy, and has most recently translated Mohammed Khudayyir’s Basrayatha and Fadhil al-Azzawi’s The Last of the Angels and Cell-Block Five. The following titles by naguib mahfouz

William M. The following titles by naguib mahfouz.

Though initially published in 1945, the themes that permeate Cairo Modern written by Nobel Laureate Naguib Mahfouz still resonate today.

Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Though initially published in 1945, the themes that permeate Cairo Modern written by Nobel Laureate Naguib Mahfouz still resonate today. In 1930s-era Cairo, race, class, religion, and gender are all burning issues in a traditionally stratified society teetering on the cusp of modernity. At the heart of the story is Mahgub Abd al-Da’im, a struggling young student with Nihilistic pretensions, whose desperate attempts to overcome his poverty and lack of status culminate in an arranged marriage to the mistress of a high government official.

Download books for free. Mahfouz Naguib, Hutichins William M. Download (epub, . 2 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Naguib Mahfouz (Egyptian Arabic: نجيب محفوظ‎, romanized: Nagīb Maḥfūẓ, IPA: ; December 11, 1911 – August 30, 2006) was an Egyptian writer who won the 1988 Nobel Prize for Literature. He is regarded as one of the first contemporary. He is regarded as one of the first contemporary writers of Arabic literature, along with Taha Hussein, to explore themes of existentialism.

The Cairo Trilogy is a trilogy of novels written by the Egyptian novelist and Nobel Prize winner Naguib Mahfouz, and one of the prime works of his literary career. Palace of Desire ( قصر الشوق, Qasr al-Shawq, 1957). Sugar Street ( السكرية, Al-Sukkariyya, 1957).

In Naguib Mahfouz's suspenseful novel a bitter and ambitious nihilist, a beautiful and impoverished student, and a corrupt official engage in a doomed ménage à trois. Cairo of the 1930s is a place of vast social and economic inequities.

Egyptian author Naguib Mahfouz (نجيب محفوظ, Nagib Machfus) was born in 1911 and died in 2006 He was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature in 1988.

Cairo Modern - US. Cairo Modern - UK. Cairo Modern - Canada. Cairo Modern - India. Arabic title: القاهرة الجديدة. Translated by William M. Hutchins. Egyptian author Naguib Mahfouz (نجيب محفوظ, Nagib Machfus) was born in 1911 and died in 2006 He was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature in 1988.

Читать онлайн Cairo Modern. 1. The sun had begun a slow descent from its heavenly apogee, and over the university’s magnificent dome its disc appeared to be bursting into the sky or returning from its rounds. It flooded treetops, verdant earth, silver-walled buildings, and the great avenue running through the Orman Gardens with rays gentled by frigid January, which had tempered their flame and infused them with benign compassion.

Электронная книга "Cairo Modern", Naguib Mahfouz In Naguib Mahfouz's suspenseful novel a bitter and ambitious nihilist, a beautiful and impoverished student, and a corrupt official engage in a doomed ménage à trois

Электронная книга "Cairo Modern", Naguib Mahfouz. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Cairo Modern" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. In Naguib Mahfouz's suspenseful novel a bitter and ambitious nihilist, a beautiful and impoverished student, and a corrupt official engage in a doomed ménage à trois.

Translated by William M. The American University in Cairo Press.

She has entered into this arrangement through the connivance of her greedy father, who has lost his money on drugs and gambling and wants her to marry a rich man for his own gain. Ihsan will be Mahgub’s wife, but she will also allow her husband’s employer, Qasim, to visit her on certain nights while Mahgub makes himself conveniently scarce, wandering the bars and cafes of the city.

In Naguib Mahfouz's suspenseful novel a bitter and ambitious nihilist, a beautiful and impoverished student, and a corrupt official engage in a doomed ménage à trois.Cairo of the 1930s is a place of vast social and economic inequities. It is also a time of change, when the universities have just opened to women and heady new philosophies imported from Europe are stirring up debates among the young. Mahgub is a fiercely proud student who is determined to keep both his poverty and his lack of principles secret from his idealistic friends. When he finds that there are no jobs for those without connections, out of desperation he agrees to participate in an elaborate deception. But what begins as a mere strategy for survival soon becomes much more for both Mahgub and his partner in crime, an equally desperate young woman named Ihsan. As they make their way through Cairo's lavish high society their precarious charade begins to unravel and the terrible price of Mahgub's Faustian bargain becomes clear. Translated by William M. Hutchins

Comments

Kirizius Kirizius
Put on a wig with a million curls,
put the highest heeled boots on your feet,
yet you remain in the end just what you are.

Goethe, Faust.

"Cairo Modern", written in 1945, is one of the great Naguib Mahfouz's earlier works. It is set in Cairo in the 1930s, a turbulent time when the old, decaying monarchical order and British dominance of Egypt entered its last stages. The social order was changing and burgeoning Egyptian nationalists, political radicals and religious zealots rubbed elbows with each other in a society on the edge of a radical transformation. Mahfouz took a snapshot of that society and the result is a book that seemed as entertaining as it was informative.

As noted accurately in the Product Description, the book unfolds like the beginning of a movie. It begins with a long-range view of the King Fuad University. It is evening and the sun shines off the golden dome of the main building. Slowly we zoom into the campus as student leave at the end of the day. It then zooms to a group of friends who, we soon discover in the next few brief chapters, represent a cross-section of modern Cairo (at least that section able to attend university.) The story eventually turns its focus upon Mahgub Abd al-Da'im. Mahgub is hungry in every sense of the word. He is hungry for success or at least the trappings of success and as his family's modest economic means are destroyed by an illness in the family he also finds himself hungering for a decent meal. He also hungers for a beautiful girl, Ihsan, who barely knows he exists. He settles instead for renting affection from a girl on the streets. Ihsan is a modern girl, with modern aspirations. She is also an admirer of western art and literature, including Goethe. This reference is not accidental as Ihsan and Mahgub are asked to enter into a Faustian bargain that on its face seems to provide them with what they each feel they most need. The rest of the novel deals with the consequences of their bargain.

"Cairo Modern" was a wonderful book. As with Mahfouz's most famous work, The Cairo Trilogy Palace Walk (Cairo Trilogy),Palace of Desire (Cairo Trilogy II), and Sugar Street (The Cairo Trilogy, 3), I found myself swept into the streets of Cairo and felt as if I had a real sense of the place and people Mahfouz wrote about. I could feel the aspirations of the primary characters and had a real sense of the changing world that they lived in. I've read most of Mahfouz's work and, even if it is smaller in scope than Cairo Trilogy or Children of the Alley, it is still a brilliant vignette of Cairo during a tumultuous moment in time. It is well worth reading. L. Fleisig
Flas Flas
This writer makes me enjoy something from Middle East culture to the one I am totally ignorant. There are displayed big psychological themes that concern to humanity but with the different view because religion.The constant duality between good and evil, specially greed- A writer value to read not only once in our life
Kieel Kieel
Book was dreadfully slow to pick up but upon its climax it is no reason other than the quick rise and fall of characters to blame.

The book became a page turner that made ones heart turn with every page. Riveting.
Coiwield Coiwield
A great story, it got me hooked right from the start and the finale was a classic, the characters are so vivid.
Ffrlel Ffrlel
it is interesting to see how human nature stays unchanged despite the culture, religion, wealth etc. we all aim for more regardless the means. shallowness in personality and character is dangerous
Gadar Gadar
This is a well translated classic and an enthralling read. The book itself is beautifully printed on excellent paper and a joy to handle.
The story is worthy of a Hitchcock film and has the reader reaching for more.
Galanjov Galanjov
Set in the 1930s and published in 1945, Cairo Modern is, by turns, ironic, satirical, farcical, and, ultimately, cynical, as the author creates a morality tale in which life's most basic guiding principles are still undetermined. World War II has kept the British in England as a foreign power, a weak Egyptian monarchy is under siege by reformers, and the army is growing. The plight of the poor is an urgent national problem. As the novel opens, four college students, all due to graduate that year, are arguing moral principles, one planning to live his life according to "the principles that God Almighty has decreed," while others argue in favor of science as the new religion, materialism, social liberation, and even love as guiding principles. None of the students have any respect for their government, which they see as "rich folks and major families."

Among the students, Mahgub Abd al-Da'im is the poorest, and he must literally starve himself in order to finish the school year, becoming more and emaciated as time passes. Finding a job upon graduation is a matter of his whole family's survival. When Mahgub contacts a former neighbor, Salim Al-Ikhshidi, for help, Al-Ikhshidi, in consultation with governmental higher-ups, presents a plan for Mahgub, who is in no position to be selective. If Mahgub will agree to marry the lover of a high-ranked government official and become part of a ménage a trois, all his expenses will be paid and a job will be guaranteed in the ministry where Al-Ikhshidi himself works. Desperate, Mahgub agrees, intending to "find satisfaction in a marriage that was a means, rather than an end." On his wedding day, he meets the bride--the former girlfriend of one of his closest friends, a girl his friend still loves.

Mahgub's marriage is filled with the expected complications as he tries to hide his poverty-stricken past and his betrayal of his college friend, at the same time that he is rising in the government, associating with wealthy and influential friends, and becoming arrogant, all sources of satire by Mahfouz. Mahgub and his wife become a perfect couple--"Each of us has sold himself in exchange for status and money." When the carefully created charade begins to unravel, the final scenes are worthy of the grandest of farces.

Ultimately, the Egyptian setting becomes less important than the universal themes and attitudes which the author is illustrating--the naivete of college students, the lure of wealth, the arrogance of power, the pretentions of the newly affluent, the willingness to sacrifice principle for expediency, and, ultimately, the ability of "the clique of most powerful criminals to destroy the weaker ones." As Mahgub's former friends gather to discuss the latest governmental scandal at the end of the novel, they hark back to their arguments at the novel's opening, wondering about the role of religion, the definition of evil, the mores of their society, and all the interactions among these. Life is busy for these young men, but tomorrow is another day. Mary Whipple