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eBook Hunger ePub

eBook Hunger ePub

by Elise Blackwell

  • ISBN: 0434011762
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Elise Blackwell
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Heinemann; First Dell Edition edition (2003)
  • Pages: 144
  • ePub book: 1745 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1381 kb
  • Other: lrf lrf mobi azw
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 881

Description

In Elise Blackwell’s original and engrossing short novel, Leningrad during the German siege forms the background for an exploration of love and betrayal, as well as for some richly sensual evocations of the pleasures of eating. J. M. Coetzee, Nobel Laureate.

In Elise Blackwell’s original and engrossing short novel, Leningrad during the German siege forms the background for an exploration of love and betrayal, as well as for some richly sensual evocations of the pleasures of eating. Perfectly judged, beautifully execute. unger has been called harrowing, but it is also uplifting. Spare, searin. finely angled vision into hell, a spare portrait of the banality of survival. Philadelphia Inquirer.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In the wake of the Siege of Leningrad in 1941, during which hundreds of thousands of people starved to death.

Hunger - Elise Blackwell. This book is not about hunger, unless the hunger you think of is the hunger of a soul for forgiveness. This is a short novel about the siege of Leningrad, nominally about the starvation that occurred in the several years that the city was under bombardment in World War 2. The narrator tells us both about the desperation of looking for food and what was being eaten as near-food, also about his colleagues in the botanical institute where he worked, and most. of all about his love for his wife, Alena, who was a victim of starvation in the first winter. Notwithstanding, the Hunger - Elise Blackwell.

Elise Blackwell is the author of three previous novels: Hunger, The Unnatural History of Cypress Parish, and Grub. Her books have been chosen for numerous best of the year lists and her short prose has be published in Witness, Topic, Seed, and other publications. Originally from southern Louisiana, she earned her MFA from the University of California-Irvine and is on the creative writing faculty of the University of South Carolina.

We were aware that the visible earth is made of ashes, and that ashes signify something.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Hunger - Elise Blackwell. We were aware that the visible earth is made of ashes, and that ashes signify something. Through the obscure depths of history we could make out the phantoms of great ships laden with riches and intellect; we could not count them. But the disasters that had sent them down were, after all, none of our affair. Elam, Nineveh, Babylon were but beautiful vague names, and the total ruin of those worlds had as little significance for us as their very existence.

Elise Blackwell HUNGER For David and Esme We were aware that the visible earth is made of ashes, and that ashes signify something

Elise Blackwell HUNGER For David and Esme We were aware that the visible earth is made of ashes, and that ashes signify something.

Read Hunger, by Elise Blackwell online on Bookmate – Scouring the world’s most remote fields and valleys, a dedicated Soviet scientist has spent his life collecting rare plants for his country’s pre.

Read Hunger, by Elise Blackwell online on Bookmate – Scouring the world’s most remote fields and valleys, a dedicated Soviet scientist has spent his life collecting rare plants for his country’s pr. Scouring the world’s most remote fields and valleys, a dedicated Soviet scientist has spent his life collecting rare plants for his country’s premiere botanical institute in Leningrad. From Northern Africa to Afghanistan, from South America to Abyssinia, he has sought and saved seeds that could be traced back to the most ancient civilizations. And the adventure has set deep in him.

Makes you think about the place and importance of food in his life and love-life.

How one person (working in a plant science facility)survived during the Stalin purges and the siege of Leningrad. Makes you think about the place and importance of food in his life and love-life. A strange book in that it's about basically unpleasant things and yet the unpleasantness is downplayed. Spirit of the blitz, we might call it here. Find similar books Profile.

In its blunt, end-of-the-road honesty this book exudes a compelling authenticity and poetic power. Hunger has been called harrowing, but it is also uplifting. It comes back again and again to the human being's ability to surprise himself, or surprise another, or to be surprised.

When German troops surround Leningrad and cut off food supplies in the autumn of 1941, no one imagines that the siege will last almost three years and take hundreds of thousands of lives. As the first 'hungry winter' sets in, the city's residents strip the bark off trees, boil and eat moss-covered stones, and trade priceless antiques for half a loaf of bread - and sex for a chunk of sugar.

Comments

invincible invincible
Author Elise Blackwell understands minimalism: offer a minute corner of an idea and allow that to engender volumes of information to the senses. HUNGER is a physically small (123 pages, and tiny pages at that) book that is a reflection of a botanist recalling the actualities of the Nazi seige of Leningrad (from September 8, 1941 to January 27, 1944), focusing on the winter of hunger ('41-'42) when thousands died from hunger and cold, resorting to cannabalism, stealing, murder, and prostitution as a means of survival. As a member of the Botanical Institute our narrator reveals his own stealing of the intitutes guarded seed, eating even a small portion that saved his life but could have saved the life of his wife had he shared.
And here begins a series of memories about his life before the seige, about his infidelities to his wife, about the various exotic ports he visited in the name of science (and indulgence).
And he shares his regrets, as he survives the seige and lives in New York years later in a house storing only unperishable food. "I told myself that pain was the price of life, its absence was the step into death."
Author Blackwell shares her legacy of a rich exposure to botany and an eqally rich knowledge of fascinating places of history such as her often used metaphor of Babylon as a perecursor to Leningrad. She sets her visuals well: "...I saw a man on a stretcher, the left half of his head gone and stuffed with cotton wool, as if the the fabric could sort numbers, direct his limbs, feel pain, remember a beloved." And after the seige has ended and the people of Leningrad return to life, she places these words in the mouth of her botanist narrator: "a bit of decency and the physical labor and small rewards of cultivating a garden from seed are the best we can strive or hope for to dull the pain of lost expectation, or to cover our vices of weakness, boredom, and need."
This is a small book in size but the experience it engenders in the reader is mighty. A most impressive first novel from a writer well worth watching.
krot krot
It amuses different trains of thought but bhy bother reading a fictional account of the Seige of Leningrad instead of actual accounts of what the survivors went through?
Trex Trex
Strange but powerful book that leaves you wanting more character development. Stalingrad and the war time Soviet experience is fascinating.
Kazijora Kazijora
Elise Blackwell has produced a quick, but thought provoking read in Hunger, her reflections on the dilemmas, agonies and deceptions of life during the siege of Leningrad. The narrator is not a likeable character but he brings a mix of personal and professional drivers to his actions during the siege which provide a wider frame to the pitiful times faced by the city's starving residents. Lingering throughout my read was the unstated irony underlining in Blakwell's scientist's drive to document and preserve the botanical diversity of the world's seed base given the devastation wrought across the Soviet Union by practices imposed by his real life peer the notorious agro-biologist Trofim Lysenko.
Goldendragon Goldendragon
During the 1940's, Hitler's troops attempted to invade Leningrad. Most people are familiar with this as an abstract historical event, but not as a personal one. This book takes you to that time of extreme hunger. It is an astonishing tale of the things people will do to eat, but more importantly, the things they will do protect the people and the objects they are passionate about.
As German troops surround the area, a group of goverment botanists decide that it is more important to save their live's work- a collection of seeds, grains, and tubers - than feed their growling stomachs. As one man guards over the stock of food, he recounts his conquests, both of the land and of the flesh.
The subject is not an easy one. I had no idea what people went through to stay alive at this time. Due to that, the author is wise in using a rather distant, detached voice throughout this book. Despite the loss of his collegues and other people close to him, the narrator does not guide our emotions. The suggestions of brutality and desperation were more than enough to conjure up a reaction within readers without the addition of flowery prose.
This is not a book that will keep you engrossed for days on end (I finished it in one sitting) nor is it a book that will make you laugh and cry. It will, however, make you more aware about the atrocities of history and what people will do to survive. The ability to weave such a fascinating tale in such a spare way is truly the mark of a talented author. I walk away from this book with a knowledge that there is more to history than what I have been taught in textbooks, and a sudden need to find out all the details that have been left out. It's rare when a book inspires me that way.