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eBook Play Dead ePub

eBook Play Dead ePub

by Ryan Brown

  • ISBN: 1439171572
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Ryan Brown
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Gallery Books (October 19, 2010)
  • Pages: 352
  • ePub book: 1664 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1785 kb
  • Other: docx rtf mbr lrf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 926

Description

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. After a rival team causes his football squad's bus to crash, killing all the players, quarterback Cole Logan-who was not present due to injury-enlists the black-magic abilities of a mysterious fan to turn his dead teammates into zombies.

Электронная книга "Play Dead", Ryan Brown. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Play Dead" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. He is the author of two novels, Thawed Out & Fed Up and Play Dead. He lives in Manhattan with his wife and children.

About Ryan Brown: Following his graduation from the University of Oklahoma, with a degree in film studies, he moved to New York, where he went on to stud. See if your friends have read any of Ryan Brown's books. Ryan Brown’s Followers (31).

Ryan Brown is an actor who has starred on the daytime dramas Guiding Light and The Young and The Restless .

He is the author of two novels, Thawed Out & Fed Up and Play Dead.

Play Dead - Ryan Brown. Bernice McFay put down her sudoku book, buried her pencil in her hair bun, and crossed over to Savannah with a fresh pot. You headin’ back for the pep rally, honey? I wouldn’t be caught dead there. Anyway, I have to set a layout for the paper. Isn’t any of what I’ve been sayin’ getting through to you?

Ryan Brown is an American actor, known for his portrayal of Bill Lewis III on Guiding Light from 1998 to 2001 and Billy . Tyler, Texas, United States of America. Play Dead: A Thriller )

Ryan Brown is an American actor, known for his portrayal of Bill Lewis III on Guiding Light from 1998 to 2001 and Billy Abbott on The Young and the Restless from 2002 to 2003. He is also the author of the novel Play Dead which was published in 2010. Education Within months of arriving in New York, he was cast in the role of Bill Lewis on the Columbia Broadcasting System Daytime Drama, Guiding Light - a role he would play for the next three years. Play Dead: A Thriller )

Today s "New York Times "bestselling thriller writers agree: Ryan Brown s compulsively readable first novel is unbeatable a darkly humorous, rich and pungent zombie shocker that melds our national obsession with football and the newest wave of fascination with the undead.

0 5 Author: Ryan Brown. Today’s New York Times bestselling thriller writers agree: Ryan Brown’s compulsively readable first novel is unbeatable-a darkly humorous, rich and pungent zombie shocker that melds our national obsession with football and the newest wave of fascination with the undead. For the first time in Killington High School history, the Jackrabbits football team is one win away from the district championship where it will face its most vicious rival, the Elmwood Heights Badgers.

Today’s #1 New York Times bestselling thriller writers agree: Ryan Brown’s compulsively readable first novel is unbeatable—a darkly humorous, rich and pungent zombie shocker that melds our national obsession with football and the newest wave of fascination with the undead.For the first time in Killington High School history, the Jackrabbits football team is one win away from the district championship where it will face its most vicious rival, the Elmwood Heights Badgers. On the way to the game, the Jackrabbits’s bus plunges into a river, killing every player except for bad-boy quarterback Cole Logan who is certain the crash was no accident—given that Cole himself was severely injured in a brutal attack by three ski-masked men earlier that day. Bent on payback, Cole turns to a mysterious fan skilled in black magic to resurrect his teammates. But unless the undead Jackrabbits defeat their murderous rival on the field, the team is destined for hell. In a desperate race against time, with only his coach’s clever daughter, Savannah Hickman, to assist him, Cole must lead his zombie team to victory. . . in a final showdown where the stakes aren’t just life or death—but damnation or salvation. Boundlessly imaginative and thrillingly satisfying, Play Dead gives small-town Texas an electrifying jolt of the supernatural, and is unquestioningly The Zombie Novel of the Year!The Comeback Story of the Season . . .

Comments

Tolrajas Tolrajas
Play Dead is what happens happens when trends go unchecked. Ryan Brown's debut novel taps into the zombie zeitgeist and combines it with high school football. The result is a goofy, mercifully-quick read.

Bad boy (but good-hearted) Cole Logan is the star quarterback of his small town's football team. His teen delinquency days are behind him, as he tries to earn a ticket out of Texas with a scholarship. Their local rivals (from the right side of the tracks) are out to punch his ticket in a completely different sense. After a brutal prank goes awry, all of Cole's teammates are killed in a bus crash. Fortunately, a local fan (and practicing witch) brings them back...

The zombie trend is becoming a slow-moving, stupid, brain-eating, shambling monstrosity and need to be removed with the proverbial editorial shotgun.

As entertaining as the "Friday Night Lights" x "Dawn of the Dead" premise is (for about 15 seconds), it doesn't hold up past the second page, much less over the course of a (happily, very-thin) book. Just like we're (hopefully) learning from steampunk, a trendy premise alone isn't enough to make a book any good.

In the case of Play Dead, the book falls down early and often. Cole is ludicrous. He's a lazy caricature of a small-town bad boy, with the obligatory ear piercing, criminal record, motorcycle & alcoholic mom. There's also a coach-with-a-guilty-secret, a tough-but-fair sheriff and a spunky-young-reporter-who-doesn't-really-like-football. None of them, for the record, stray an inch from their predictable roles.

If anything, the entertainment value comes from the rival team - a group of steroid-crazed thugs. Between perpetually botching their alibis and desperately trying to get laid, they're actually a fairly funny crew. And, although completely unsympathetic, Brown does try to give a little background on why they're so deranged.

"A little background", by the way, is the key to Play Dead. Most of the book goes completely unexplained. Although I'm never a fan of world-building, Play Dead takes story-telling to the opposite end of the spectrum. Stuff just... happens... generally without any explanation whatsoever. When the reader is treated to the courtesy of an explanation (e.g. the rival team are so obsessed because their boosters beat them with meathooks when they lose a game), it is thrown out, and then promptly ignored.

This is true for the larger plot points as well. The climactic football game is important... why? A witch tells us that the zombies have to play and win, "or else". We never know why. Or for what. And the fact that the two teams weren't even going to play one another in the first place is swept under the carpet. A few "zombies are like teenagers" and "small town rivalries are really weird" jokes go a (moderately) long way, but not far enough.

The whole book - from concept to cover to "character" and "plot" - feels like a quick win. This is a triumph of marketing over matter, and will, I suspect, be quickly gracing the shelves of bargain bookshelves all over the English-speaking world.
Fast Lovebird Fast Lovebird
I don't ususally question that taste of other reviewers, to each his own, but anyone giving this story over 2 stars must be a family member or devoted friend of the author. I can't say anything about the paper thin plot that hasn't already been said. The characters are just about as deep as the pages their words are printed on. But as bad as this story is I have one caution, if you must buy this work then at least buy the book. I got the audio CD and if anything could've made this story worse it was the horrible way the thing was read by a character actor on the CD.

But it's always been my way to look for the silver lining in any bad situation and here it's this: If you are dreaming of getting your work published someday but you have no writing talent to speak of there is still hope for you. Believe me, if someone at a publishing house thought this story worth reproducing and marketing no story is too bad for print.
Cordalas Cordalas
Go big or go home, that's what Texas is known for and this book doesn't fall short of that.

I honestly didn't know what I was getting myself into when I found this book at a thrift shop in 12'. But the cover was intriguing and the summary caught my interest, so for a $1, I said what the hell. If you don't take this seriously and take it lightly, you'll enjoy it.

Diving head first I was surprised by how many point of views we got, at least four- probably more. And it's an instant change between chapters so it'll take a little while to feel for who's point of view you're reading now. It was disconnecting sometimes. I was actually shocked that we also got to see the bus crash happen while being behind the heartless murderers eyes, though at the time not all knew the plan was to get rid of their rival team for good. It was crazy how serious everyone took football to the extreme that the opposing team would cut off the rival quarterbacks fingers so he couldn't play, well let's just say that back fired. Again, take this lightly because this whole book is filled with extreme situations that would never happen (at least I pray it'll never happen).

The Badgers, our main guy Cole's rival team is filled with a bunch of sore losers. They're afraid of losing this season and end up being tortured again by their couch because of losing (like I said, it's extreme). So they take to doing a new form of steroids to make sure they win every game but when they find out the Jackrabbits are in the finals they think of new forms of cheating, like cutting off Cole's fingers with a hatchet.

With so much craziness and gore, which you expect from a zombie book, you'd think a girl that loves this stuff could never get bored of it.

Well, there's a first for everything.

I think the main reason why I lost interest after a while of reading, when I would read this, was because of the extreme situations- it's just soo unbelievable! And some of it is just so stupid, not really the action but the thinking of some of these characters that bring them to do these stupid stuff. Like seriously come one, must be all those steroids the bad guys were taking.

And sometimes I would just lose interest in between the action. I don't know why but I did, which is why it took me half a year to read- because I just couldn't fully get into it. There was too much going on and again, it was extreme over the sport of football. Just don't get it.

Overall I liked it but once I finally finished it I was happy for it to end. Play Dead is an roller coaster of extremes after extremes and once I reached the last page, I just didn't get it. Sometimes I would get sucked in and sometimes I would laugh at the conversations between Cole and his love interest- whom I pictured Holland Roden the whole time. Complete description to the T and reminded me of her character on Teen Wolf too.

But I don't think I was 100% satisfied. I was happy Cole and her got together and that the team was able to move on (sorry for the spoiler) but just, what was the point? Maybe it's cause I'm not a huge football fan haha. I enjoyed the paranormal aspect, the zombies and the old hag. But the extremes for the football aspect, like why? Maybe if you're a huge football fan you'll get it.