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eBook The Waters of Kronos ePub

eBook The Waters of Kronos ePub

by Conrad Richter

  • ISBN: 027102240X
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Conrad Richter
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penn State University Press (January 8, 2003)
  • Pages: 192
  • ePub book: 1176 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1841 kb
  • Other: lrf txt azw lrf
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 773

Description

The Waters of Kronos.

The Waters of Kronos. Cover jacket design by Terrence Tymon.

Conrad Michael Richter (October 13, 1890 – October 30, 1968) was an American novelist whose lyrical work is concerned largely with life on the American frontier in various periods. His novel The Town (1950), the last story of his trilogy The Awakening Land about the Ohio frontier, won the 1951 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His novel The Waters of Kronos won the 1961 National Book Award for Fiction

The Waters of Kronos book.

The Waters of Kronos book. From the time of its first publication in 1960, Conrad Richter's The Waters of Kronos sparked lively debate about the extent to which its story of a belated return to childhood scenes mirrored key events of Richter's own life.

Conrad Richter (1890-1968) was awarded the National Book Award for The Waters of Kronos in 1961. He was also awarded the Pulitzer Prize for The Town, the last volume in a trilogy about frontier life in Ohio, in 1951. This very short book DOES cause us to ponder the transcience of everyday life and question our own perceptions of both it and our familial relationships, but we are ultimately frustrated and left disappointed by Richter not being more forthright. This evocative, thought-provoking story would have been no less effective with an appropriate denouement, and it would have been considerably more satisfying.

Troubled sleep had confused him, taken with dreams of a bridge that men had to pass through

Troubled sleep had confused him, taken with dreams of a bridge that men had to pass through. ctant, talking incoherently to themselves to brave them into the black unknown. Only one had been in a hurry, with a horse and buggy that rattled the plank and stirred the dry dust so the dreamer could taste it in his throat. Now the dreamer lay remembering, seeing again in his mind the shadowy figures, hearing their lonely voices, feeling the threat and sadness of that bridge,. by. Richter, Conrad, 1890-1968. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Francis Ong on September 29, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

The Waters of Kronos tells a story parallel to the life of its author-and it is believed in certain circles to be autobiographical

The Waters of Kronos tells a story parallel to the life of its author-and it is believed in certain circles to be autobiographical. It established Richter's reputation as a great American novelist, winning the National Book Award in 1960. One fee. Stacks of books.

Inspired by the author’s personal history, The Waters of Kronos is considered by many to be Conrad Richter’s masterpiece

Inspired by the author’s personal history, The Waters of Kronos is considered by many to be Conrad Richter’s masterpiece. Lyrical, poignant, dreamlike, and beautifully wrought, it is a classic work of twentieth-century American literature.

This page contains details about the Fiction book The Waters of Kronos by Conrad Richter published in 1960. This book is the 2066th greatest Fiction book of all time as determined by thegreatestbooks. John Donner, the main protagonist in The Waters of Kronos, traces a similar route from west to east, although he finds that his family home and native town have been submerged under the deep waters of a lake formed by the construction of a hydroelectric dam.

The Waters of Kronos is a novel by Conrad Richter published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1960. It won the National Book Award for Fiction in 1961. According to Penn State University, "this is the story of John Donner, an aging writer who has driven from the West Coast back to Unionville, Pennsylvania, where he grew up. He discovers that the town he once knew has been submerged under the Kronos River because of a dam created to supply power for a hydroelectric plant

From the time of its first publication in 1960, Conrad Richter's The Waters of Kronos sparked lively debate about the extent to which its story of a belated return to childhood scenes mirrored key events of Richter's own life. As was well known at the time, Richter had spent several years in the Southwest, where he collected the material for his first successful book, Early Americans and Other Stories, but by 1933, he had returned to live in his hometown, Pine Grove, Pennsylvania.

John Donner, the main protagonist in The Waters of Kronos, traces a similar route from west to east, although he finds that his family home and native town have been submerged under the deep waters of a lake formed by the construction of a hydroelectric dam. As Richter narrates his alter ego's efforts to salvage his past, he moves beyond "semi-autobiography" to offer what are widely recognized as his most haunting reflections upon the power of family history, the fragility of human memory, and art's role in structuring the communal ethos. David McCullough, a fellow Pulitzer Prize winner, met and befriended Richter in the 1960s and has called him "an American master," praising The Waters of Kronos as "his most beautiful book."

Comments

Kupidon Kupidon
Conrad Richter's solid reputation, some very positive Amazon reviews, and a (then) low "monthly special" price made this seem quite attractive to me. At first, I thoroughly enjoyed every minute of this haunting short novel about world-weary John Donner's nostalgic visit to his hometown past -- and I will admit to shedding a tear or two. But then, while I was savoring what I had thus far read, looking forward to what (I thought) was yet to come, and pondering how it would all end, the story just stopped; it ended abruptly with anticipation but without resolution and with a great many questions left unanswered. I felt cheated and disappointed for investing my time and emotions into what proved to be an under-developed, go-nowhere story.

When reading fanciful fiction I am more than willing to suspend my disbelief, but I would still have liked some suggestion or hint as to how Donner was able to return to his vanished boyhood hometown, a town long-since flooded by the creation of a dam. Then, after having seemingly done so, how would he be able to return to the present? (Or would he?) Were these simply the dream-recollections of an old and possibly dying man who imagines what it would be like to re-visit his past, a past where (as the adult he now is) he is recognized by virtually nobody except a senile aunt and an old horse? How would the reunion he anticipates (at novel's end) with his mother result? Would HER ultimate recognition of him represent something transformational (such as, perhaps, the moment of his passing from physical life to eternal life and a welcome back to the family)? Or would she also treat him like a stranger, the ultimate affirmation that you can't go home again? (And however she receives him, then what? Where is all this heading?) The reader would like to know how much of this is "really" happening to him and how much he is imagining. Moreover, how much of THEIR behavior toward him (as it is represented to us) is colored by HIS memories, impressions, and misinterpretations of them? We know he comes to realize he has misjudged his father's love for him; that is a major theme. But has he misjudged other family members as well? How will HE (and by extension WE) profit from what he learns from this experience?

We'll never know. We cannot resolve ANY of these questions because the author has neither told us nor provided adequate information to enable us to correctly work out any of these matters for ourselves. Some readers may assert that such open-ended indefiniteness is what makes this book great and a "classic." If so, I respectfully disagree. To answer the above questions goes beyond trying to fill in the gaps to discern what the author INTENDED; the gaps are too wide, his intentions too ill-defined. I would suggest that such ambiguity has, instead, contributed to reader dissatisfaction resulting in this book's relative obscurity and thereby greatly hindering its chances of ever truly becoming a classic. In fact, the unresolved ending feels somewhat as if Richter painted himself into a corner (figuratively speaking) from which he could not get out -- so he simply stopped at that enigmatic point. His conundrum thus becomes ours.

It is easier to write a book that raises questions and issues than it is to write one that satisfactorily addresses and resolves them. Furthermore, the so-obvious-it-cannot-be-missed symbolism of the title and the treacly sentimental manipulation of readers' emotions throughout the story (as well as the ambiguous, decide-for-yourself ending) come across as sophomoric literary devices. And in the hands of a lesser writer they might very well have been. But Richter's prior literary experience and prestige would SEEM to belie those possibilities. So, discounting such criticisms, we find ourselves even more confused by what we have read and all the more curious as to why he chose to tell this story the way he has.

This very short book DOES cause us to ponder the transcience of everyday life and question our own perceptions of both it and our familial relationships, but we are ultimately frustrated and left disappointed by Richter not being more forthright. This evocative, thought-provoking story would have been no less effective with an appropriate denouement, and it would have been considerably more satisfying.

Finally, from a technical standpoint, novels and short stories differ in significant ways, length being only one factor and not necessarily the most significant one. Novels are (usually) longer because of WHAT they attempt to do and HOW they attempt to do it. In terms of formal structure, plot complexity, character depiction and evolution, and thematic development, "The Waters of Kronos" is more characteristic of a short story than a novel. The irresolution displayed in it is more common to certain types of short stories than more fully-developed novels, and in such short stories a "weak" or "soft" ending is more readily tolerated (even if not always fully appreciated) by readers. My criticism of this work is essentially with regard to its shortcomings as a novel -- and, incredibly, an award-winning one at that! But (conversely) to pay as much as $8.99 for what is structurally and qualitatively essentially a very long "short story" (despite being originally packaged as a book and, therefore, called a "novel") is too much to pay for so little.
Dream Dream
A beautiful book existentially relevant to today's global crises of whole communities being swallowed up by fire, flood, development, and rising sea levels. Richter's writings in the Water of Kronos and his other books prefaces many of the modern day crises of disruption of spiritual and communities ties with the increase in ecological disasters, environmental crises, and development, all in deep, haunting and poetic prose. It is a wonderful and moving read.
Scream_I LOVE YOU Scream_I LOVE YOU
Brilliant. Brilliant and, oh, such majestic writing expressing equally brilliant insight and thought. Some think Richter is saying you can't go home. Nay, I disagree. I believe he's saying you can -- and, indeed, he has. This is truly a marvelous literary treat.
Tisicai Tisicai
A nostalgic and thought-provoking story about coming full circle in life and going back to the days of our childhood. Or rather about how you can't go back, illustrated by the waters of the reservoir which drowned the protagonist's childhood village. Worth reading.
Voodoogore Voodoogore
Another evocative, vividly told tale by Conrad Richter. He takes you along with John Donner on his last journey through his boyhood at the end of his life.
Ranicengi Ranicengi
Enjoyed the story very much; author is a good storyteller.
Ballazan Ballazan
Very good read.
good book