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eBook The Horns of the Buffalo ePub

eBook The Horns of the Buffalo ePub

by John Wilcox

  • ISBN: 0755333675
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: John Wilcox
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Headline; paperback / softback edition (2004)
  • Pages: 403
  • ePub book: 1507 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1220 kb
  • Other: lit mobi lrf mbr
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 575

Description

Buffalo is the county seat of Erie County, and the second most populous city in the . state of New York, after New York City

Buffalo is the county seat of Erie County, and the second most populous city in the . state of New York, after New York City. Originating around 1789 as a small trading community inhabited by the Neutral Nation near the mouth of Buffalo Creek, the city, then a town, grew quickly after the opening of the Erie Canal in 1825, with the city at its western terminus.

of the Buffalo JOHN WILCOX headline ww. eadline.

The Horns of the Buffalo JOHN WILCOX headline ww.

Quickly he studied the terrain ahead and then cantered cautiously across the meadow towards the house that lay at its corner e spurred again, head down, along.

Quickly he studied the terrain ahead and then cantered cautiously across the meadow towards the house that lay at its corner e spurred again, head down, along its warm red length, until he gained the shelter of a coppice. It was there that he met the soldier. The infantryman was young and clearly near to exhaustion. His Confederate grey hardly seemed a uniform, so tattered was it, and the rifle slung across his back had hooked upon branches that had torn away as he ran through the undergrowth.

When I found a copy of John Wilcox’s The Horns of the Buffalo at one of Seattle’s Half-Price Book’s I was jubilant to. .John Wilcox was a journalist for many years before travelling all round the world while working in industry. He is now a full-time writer.

When I found a copy of John Wilcox’s The Horns of the Buffalo at one of Seattle’s Half-Price Book’s I was jubilant to say the least. Mr. Wilcox comes recommended by various readers across the web.

Horns of the Buffalo was a pretty good read. John Wilcox started out as a local reporter and journalist in Birmingham before spending many years in industry, which took him all round the world. It's no Sharpe, and it kind of follows the same formula, Officer (Sharpe/Fonthill) loyal non-English NCO (Irish Harper/Welsh Jenkins) fights in histoical battle. I would still recommend to historical fiction fans. He finally sold his company to devote himself to writing full-time. He lives in Salisbury. Other books in the series. Simon Fonthill (1 - 10 of 12 books). Books by John Wilcox. Mor. rivia About The Horns of the.

Books related to The Horns of the Buffalo. All in Scarlet Uniform. The Devil's Own. Garry Douglas Kilworth. The Diamond Frontier.

In 1879 the redcoats of the British Army are universally regarded as the finest fighting force in the world. Among them is Lieutenant Simon Fonthill, dispatched to South Africa with much to prove: for Colonel Covington, his former Commanding Officer, has slanderously branded him a coward. In the Cape, tension is high. The Zulus, an independent nation of magnificently militant tribesmen, threaten the colonial government's vision of a united South Africa

Used availability for John Wilcox's The Horns of the Buffalo.

Used availability for John Wilcox's The Horns of the Buffalo. November 2004 : UK Hardback.

John Wilcox also takes the historical illustration road and makes a very accomplished debut in the process. The book takes us on a whistle stop tour of the Zulu wars

John Wilcox also takes the historical illustration road and makes a very accomplished debut in the process. As a result his main hero, Simon Fonthill, perhaps lacks a bit of 'umphh!' when compared to Sharpe or Aubrey. He is more the pivot around which other more colourful characters revolve. Chief amongst them the, hard drinking little Welsh hard man Jenkins. A truly loveable rogue! The book takes us on a whistle stop tour of the Zulu wars. The blundering British diplomacy, the disaster of Isandlwana and of course Rorkes drift! If I have a gripe it's that Rorks drift isn't.

The year is 1900 and China is once again plunged into barbaric chaos. The Horns of the Buffalo. The Boxers, a cult of young peasants who blame the foreign barbarians living in their country – particularly the missionaries – for the nation's ills, are rampaging through the country, killing any foreigners. China's Dowager Empress – 'The Dragon Lady' – secretly encourages them.

paperback, fine In stock shipped from our UK warehouse

Comments

BeatHoWin BeatHoWin
This is the frst, but certainly not the last, book I have read by John Wilcox. The hero, Simon Fonthill, is a believable character and the entire book is loaded with realistic characters. The author blends historical facts with fiction to blend his fictional character into a realistic historical setteing. There is a romantic interest without overdoing it. For the action fans, there certainly is plenty of that and it's also realistic. No glory here, only the nitty gritty of battle and by being realistic, the glory takes cre of itself. I am looking forward to reading the next book in this series.
Whitemaster Whitemaster
Okay, it aint "War and Peace", but "The Horns of the Buffalo" was an enjoyable change of pace from my usual reading fare. A fictional account of a historic battle between the British Army and that of the Zulu Empire, the book is informative and fast-paced. As a few other reviewers have noted, the plot is predictible and the characters seem drawn from central casting. But also like other reviewers I found the book entertaining, enjoyable and a nice change of pace.
Karg Karg
he's not copying either Cornwell's style or characters. Wilcox is definitely his own man and his hero is no Sharpe. Simon Fonthill, while capable of handling himself in combat every bit as efficiently as Sharpe, doesn't like the army and seems to be trying his best to stay out of it. Despite all his efforts however, he cannot eliminate the armed forces from his life and becomes involved mainly in political and military intrigue - gathering information for the troops rather than standing by their side and commanding them in battle, although he sometimes finds himself doing this.

I'm reluctant to go into detail regarding the plot because I think it's important that the readers discover for themselves how the story-line unfolds; I know I'd be disappointed if a reviewer revealed too much in a synposis. Suffice to say it's every bit as exciting as anything Cornwell ever wrote, the characters are as well-developed, the story action-packed, and the conflicts exhilarating.

One of the nicest things about it is that there are 3 sequels, each capable of standing on its own and each equally stimulating. If you enjoyed Forester, Cornwell, Reeman, etc., you can't fail to appreciate Wilcox.
Shou Shou
I don't quite understand the criticism of this book by the gentleman from Tel Aviv, I found it hard to put down, particularly the portion dealing with Isandawana and Rorke's Drift. I am pleased to have discovered a new series and will immediately obtain Wilcox' other Fonthill books.
Vivados Vivados
Simion Fonthill's first appearance, is a solid enough read, but in my mind unrealistic, and repetitive of many of the novels that have come before it. The action and adventure in this book is okay, too much like Cornwell to stand out, and thus it falls in amongst the massive pile of wannabe Sharpe novels. Mind you the story is interesting in some parts, but in others not so much. Wilcox throws his hero into the unknown of the South African back country prior to the Zulu war of 1879. Here he meets the Zulu king Cetshwayo, survives the slaughter at Isandlwana, only to ride right into the defense at Rorke's Drift, okay fine, rather implausible in my opinion, for the British were annihilated at Isandlwana, almost to a man, but some did survive the carnage, so perhaps its not too far fetched, but to me the story just didn't work. This is not to say that the tale is not worth while, its just when you compare it to the greatness of Fraser, or Cornwall, it is lacking in many ways.
Brightcaster Brightcaster
I have read several in this series and they are all good.
Kirizius Kirizius
What we read on a rainy day is what makes it a joy to have that cup of coffee and enjoy a good book.
This is a five star read from cover to cover. Great book!