cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Raven Talks Back
eBook Raven Talks Back ePub

eBook Raven Talks Back ePub

by Beth Anderson

  • ISBN: 0982144393
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Beth Anderson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Krill Press (May 15, 2011)
  • Pages: 306
  • ePub book: 1388 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1426 kb
  • Other: azw lrf mobi rtf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 289

Description

Raven Talks Back has a beautiful, lyrical opening that captures the mood of the Alaskan setting and draws you right i. I just finished reading RAVEN TALKS BACK written by Beth Anderson on my Kindle!

Raven Talks Back has a beautiful, lyrical opening that captures the mood of the Alaskan setting and draws you right in. Raven is a good character who gains strength as she finds her way through the mystery, her life, and her own shattered dreams. All the characters are deep and layered, people you can believe in even if you don't always like some of them. I just finished reading RAVEN TALKS BACK written by Beth Anderson on my Kindle! Wow! This woman can WRITE!

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Beth Anderson's books.

Discover new books on Goodreads. Beth Anderson’s Followers. None yet. Beth Anderson.

Raven Talks Back book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Raven Morressey is living the good life. Nice home, husband, three. Details (if other): Cancel.

Find nearly any book by Beth Anderson. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Beth Anderson (Anderson, Beth). used books, rare books and new books. Find all books by 'Beth Anderson' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'Beth Anderson'. Curriculum Materials Center Collection. ISBN 9780838977071 (978-0-8389-7707-1) Softcover, Amer Library Assn, 1993. ISBN 9780982144398 (978-821443-9-8) Softcover, Krill Press, 2011. Find signed collectible books: 'Raven Talks Back'.

Beth Anderson (born 1954) is an American singer and voice actress from Lexington, Kentucky. Anderson's first notable release was the song "Dance Dance Dance" which appeared in the 1983 film Scarface as well as on its soundtrack

Beth Anderson (born 1954) is an American singer and voice actress from Lexington, Kentucky. Anderson's first notable release was the song "Dance Dance Dance" which appeared in the 1983 film Scarface as well as on its soundtrack. Dance Dance Dance" became iconic in the following years due to its use in the scene where Octavio the Clown is gunned down. The song also appeared on the US 7" version of Debbie Harry's single "Rush Rush", another song from the Scarface soundtrack

The Rose by Beth Anderson. They’ve been sharing intimate fantasies on line, but now it’s time to take their relationship into the real world

The Rose by Beth Anderson. They’ve been sharing intimate fantasies on line, but now it’s time to take their relationship into the real world. Attending his home for her first ‘training session’ and accepting a rose as the symbol of her submission, she finally learns what it’s like to be on the end of a masterfully delivered punishment. These stories have also been published in Naughty Spanking Three ISBN 9781906373702. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Raven Morressey is living the good life. Nice home, husband, three healthy children, and it's finally summertime, when life is again lovely in Valdez, Alaska. All this explodes one morning when builders, digging up her back yard, uncover a recently murdered headless, handless female body covered with scarification-hundreds of colored designs cut into the skin to resemble tattoos. As if this isn't enough, where the corpse's head should have been is a large rock with a face painted on that resembles an Alaska Native mask. Raven's eight year old son, Timmy, is the first one to see the body and is suddenly unable to walk or respond in any way. On that same day, Raven hears the voice of her long dead Athabascan father coming from Timmy, who is unaware of the ancient hunting chants he sings in his sleep and the words he suddenly speaks in Raven's native tongue-a language he does not know. Jack O'Banion, Valdez's Chief of Police for the past few years, faced with his first murder case in Valdez, begins his official investigation. Everywhere he goes he finds nothing but deception. The town seems to have closed into itself and nobody will tell him anything that might help him solve this case. Then one murder quickly morphs into two, and then three, and the Alaska State Troopers are hot on his back to find the killer now. Between Raven's voices and the visions she develops, and Jack, whose career as well as his contented life in Valdez are on the line, they both feel they have to find the killer and restore some sanity to the town-not to mention their own lives, which are quickly unraveling out of control.

Comments

Doomwarden Doomwarden
I loved Raven Talks Back. This terrific mystery combines elements of the mystical with good old-fashioned storytelling. The discovery of a headless, handless body found in Raven Morrissey's backyard starts a series of events that change her and her family's life forever. Her son is traumatized into silence, her husband's attitude is perplexing, and Raven thinks she losing her mind when she sees and hears things she couldn't possibly see and hear. Adding to the town's upheaval, two more similar murders occur within a short period of time. There's no shortage of suspects when it's discovered that a few people in the small, picturesque town of Valdez, Alaska, are not who they seem to be.

Local police chief, Jack O'Banion, left Dallas to escape the stressful effects of murder and mayhem, and now he's confronted with crimes so heinous, he's having trouble finding the thread that ties them together. The townspeople pressure him to find the killer, and as if that wasn't enough weighing on the cop, he can't get the beautiful, but married, Raven out of his mind, and his heart.

Surprises galore, including a couple of side plots--I believe there should always be at least two plots in a book--make this a captivating read from beginning to end. Highly recommended.
Global Progression Global Progression
If [[ASIN:B004Y07MC6 Raven Talks Back (A Raven Morressey Mystery)]isn't optioned for a movie I'll eat my hat. The opening paragraphs set the scene for a story of soul memory, a mother's love, an unraveling marriage and a serial killer with a hideous idea of revenge.

(Quote)
The spirits of my ancestors live in the towering Chugach Mountains that surround my world in Valdez. I know they are there. I can see them most mornings, great cottony masses of gray fog rolling down the mountains, sinister characters in a black and white movie, shivering and mourning their disintegration above the marina before they disappear over Prince William Sound.

They call to me through that fog, whispering my name. I hear them, soft, desolate sounds you can only hear if you're really a part of this beautiful land.

My people will tell my story to future generations of Athabascans, and tourists from the lower forty-eight who come to walk through our villages and see for themselves how little is left of what we were. We have no written ancient history. Everything known about our past has evolved only because of stories told in the dark of night before our children go to sleep, when wind screams over the mountaintops and roars down through the passes, bringing the icy chill of our glaciers spiraling into our homes in spite of insulation invented by modern man. The wind is still bitter and we know it.
End quote)

The speaker is Raven Morressey, a beautiful Athabascan woman. When a viciously murdered and mutilated body turns up in Raven's yard it's the first in a series of murders that shakes the town to its core. For Raven it's doubly tragic. Her young son Timmy sees the body in the yard and is struck dumb. For most of the story, despite sessions with a psychologist in Anchorage, Timmy doesn't say a word. When he finally speaks it's with another voice in an ancient language.

Anderson's town is a hiding place for restless people who shed their identities like snakes shedding skin. Past lives and deeply buried secrets just wait to be revealed. Anderson's characters seem like ordinary folks. Red Morressey, Raven's husband, is a high school counselor and Boy Scout troop leader. Their three children are Timmy, age 8; Alice, age 12; and Charlie, a typically bored 16-year-old.

There's Jack, an easy going police chief who wears silver-tipped snakeskin boots and a cowboy hat; Mark, a former Navy Seal settled into a construction business and a family life that includes a weekly neighborhood cookout; Kimberly, a wise but eccentric old lady and former porn star who lives to torment her son and his bitchy wife; and Hopscotch, a debonair air taxi pilot who is Raven's confidant.

For my taste, Anderson does everything right. The children are well drawn, coming across as normal children who are part of the story without taking it over. It's still a story of and for adults, as Jack goes about his daily chore of knocking on doors and talking to anyone who might shed light on the murders, but Timmy holds the key to the mystery, and a careless, habitual act by Charlie opens the door for a terrifying denouement.

While the sessions with the psychologist are fascinating, Anderson sticks to the unraveling of the town's peaceful façade without turning the book into a psychological mystery. She switches viewpoints back and forth to tell the story. It's not something I usually like but it seems to fit here and Anderson handles it without a glitch.
Very Old Chap Very Old Chap
Can't wait for the next in the series of Raven Morressey's mysteries. Three murders in one little Alaskan village, a family torn apart as bodies are discovered, an 8-year-old fun-loving boy unable to speak from the shock of seeing the first body, a cop mystified by dead bodies turning up and town's people so defensive in helping find the killer, keeps this book quite exciting. There are many twists and turns as you wonder who is really guilty. In the mist of it all, there are mischievous teenagers adding to the problems. I've read several of this author's books but this one outdoes them all and I highly recommend this to anyone looking for a good mystery.

Virginia from Indiana
Zacki Zacki
Raven Talks Back has a beautiful, lyrical opening that captures the mood of the Alaskan setting and draws you right in. Raven is a good character who gains strength as she finds her way through the mystery, her life, and her own shattered dreams. All the characters are deep and layered, people you can believe in even if you don't always like some of them. But the setting is magnificent. Ms. Anderson lets you breathe the air and smell the fresh pines in the wind. Her descriptions, which are never overdone, let you see Valdez through the characters' eyes. I didn't guess whodunnit till late in the book. There are plenty of red herrings with good motives, but the clues are there--I just didn't spot them till near the end. This is a good read, and I loved it. I think this is the beginning of a new series. I'm ready for the next one.
Hallolan Hallolan
I just finished "Raven Talks Back" and would love to read more about Raven Morrissey. Living in Alaska for almost ten years, I'm always looking for mysteries that take place here. The author's description of Valdez and the people who live there is compelling and she adds some native mysticism to spice up the story. There were many possible suspects for the poor police chief to sort out and the ending was a surprise, which is the way it should be. Please, Ms. Anderson, write a sequel!
Pumpit Pumpit
The plot, characters, and setting in Valdez, Alaska drew me in immediately and held my attention to the last page. Beth Anderson is clearly an adept storyteller; she kept the tension high without it ever feeling contrived. Raven is an intriguing, sympathetic character, and I loved the psychic elements to this story that drew on her Athabascan background. I do hope this book will be more readily available soon and that there will be a sequel. A excellent tale.