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eBook Elizabeth, the Witch's Daughter ePub

eBook Elizabeth, the Witch's Daughter ePub

by Lynda M. Andrews

  • ISBN: 0709160720
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Lynda M. Andrews
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Robert Hale Ltd (June 2, 1977)
  • Pages: 192
  • ePub book: 1228 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1814 kb
  • Other: lit lrf lrf docx
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 909

Description

Elizabeth, The Witch's Daughter book. Lynda M. Andrews, who also writes as Lyn Andrews, is the Sunday Times Number One bestselling author of over 34 sagas, and one of the top 100 bestselling authors in the UK.

Elizabeth, The Witch's Daughter book. She was born and raised in Liverpool, which serves as the inspiration for many of her novels. She now divides her time between Merseyside and the Isle of Man, where she has lived for several years.

Lynda M. Andrews is changing that, though, with Elizabeth, The Witch's Daughter. Really, my only complaint about this book is that I flew through it far too quickly. Granted, even if it was twice as long I'd still probably feel like it was too short. I knew (thanks to my basic knowledge) about Elizabeth I being "The Virgin Queen" and the daughter of Henry VIII. I knew he went through wives like some monarchs went through. not toilet paper because that's only been around since the mid- to late-1800s. It's okay, though, because now I feel like I have to catch up on the missing 300 years worth of England's history via books, movies, and television series.

Elizabeth, the Witch’s Daughter Table of Contents Cover Title Page Prologue Chapter One Chapter Two . Elizabeth, the Witch’s Daughter. The girl who lay in the bed watched her women as they carefully folded and removed her discarded clothes.

Elizabeth, the Witch’s Daughter Table of Contents Cover Title Page Prologue Chapter One Chapter Two Chapter Three Chapter Four Chapter Five Chapter Si.

Elizabeth, The Witch's Daughter - Lynda M. Andrews. At the little conduit in the Chepe she was presented with an English Bible, that book for whose sake so many had suffered the fires of Smithfield in her sister’s reign. With reverence she accepted it, kissed it and laid it upon her breast, promising to read it diligently to the great comfort, and no doubt relief, of many present.

Books related to Elizabeth, The Witch's Daughter. Books related to Elizabeth, The Witch's Daughter.

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Elizabeth I: From princess, to outcast, to the world's most powerful queen. With few she can trust, Elizabeth comes to womanhood during the reigns of her brother and sister, shrouded by a web of deceit. It is recorded that never once during her life did Elizabeth Tudor speak of her mother Anne Boleyn; but did she never think of her? As a little girl, Elizabeth Tudor knows she is a princess but one day is suddenly told she is now 'the Lady Elizabeth'. She lives in constant danger, yet rises above her detractors to defy her mother's legacy, and go down in history as one of England's most ruthless and powerful monarchs.

Comments

Trex Trex
I enjoyed the book. It's a light simple read suited for a teen. Not being a teen, and having read numerous books about the period, I found myself flying through it. But it moves fast and contains plenty of historical information. I dropped a star because the punctuation is horrendous. Commas are used in place of semicolons. If you're not picky about that sort of thing, you may like the book. And it's squeaky clean, if that is of interest.
Skrimpak Skrimpak
Enjoyed the story very much! Told from the first person, Elizabeth became a real person. So much ran parallel to other storylines.
I_LOVE_228 I_LOVE_228
No depth - a very fast read that quickly gives bare bones of Elizabeth's life.
Nalmetus Nalmetus
So many books about Elizabeth I liked this one. Hard to really know what actually went on. Different writers go in different directions.
Malara Malara
If you've been around me at all, it likely doesn't shock you to be told that I'm a ginormous anglophile. I frequently lament being born on the wrong side of the pond and have already informed my son that his life goal should be to get a good enough job to be able to send me on a cruise across the Atlantic. You probably have also figured out already that I'm a bit of a history nerd .... but ....

I kind of feel like I need to hang my head in shame for a moment or two.

When it comes to English history? I've only ever really paid attention to anything pre-1400s and post-1700s. I'm not quite sure how, but I've pretty much skipped 300 years of anything more than just basic knowledge.

Lynda M. Andrews is changing that, though, with Elizabeth, The Witch's Daughter. I knew (thanks to my basic knowledge) about Elizabeth I being "The Virgin Queen" and the daughter of Henry VIII. I knew he went through wives like some monarchs went through ... well ... not toilet paper because that's only been around since the mid- to late-1800s. You know what I mean, though. It was fascinating for me to get a glimpse into what her life might have been like growing up with a distant father and a revolving door of stepmothers after her own mother had been killed when she was just a toddler. She went from being told that the was a princess and would some day be Queen to a subject much like any other -- under the rule of her own half-brother and then her half-sister. She went from feeling in control and cherished to scrutinized and threatened. The poor girl was on a roller-coaster before they even existed!

I quite fell for Bess. She felt fiercely independent because she had to be and, at the same time, had a deep longing to have someone she could depend on as she probably would have been able to depend on her mother under normal circumstances. She did have Kat Ashley, her governess and companion for much of her early life, and that relationship was a joy to read .... most of the time. Any relationship Elizabeth had with anyone was bound to be rocky since she had such enormous trust issues and, as Kat pointed out on several occasions, she was definitely her father's daughter when it came to stubbornness and temper.

Really, my only complaint about this book is that I flew through it far too quickly. Granted, even if it was twice as long I'd still probably feel like it was too short. It's okay, though, because now I feel like I have to catch up on the missing 300 years worth of England's history via books, movies, and television series. It'll be the gift that keeps on giving.
Hasirri Hasirri
Having read many books on Mary and Elizabeth, I was pleasantly surprised to get a new insight into their lives and character's.