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eBook The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror: 18th Annual Collection ePub

eBook The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror: 18th Annual Collection ePub

by Kelly Link,Gavin Grant,Ellen Datlow

  • ISBN: 0312341938
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Kelly Link,Gavin Grant,Ellen Datlow
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press; First Edition edition (August 1, 2005)
  • Pages: 608
  • ePub book: 1191 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1745 kb
  • Other: docx txt lrf mbr
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 698

Description

Praise for The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror Seventeenth Annual Collection.

Praise for The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror Seventeenth Annual Collection.

The Year's Best Fantasy: First Annual Collection. 20 : The Night Whiskey - Jeffrey Ford Year's Best Fantasy and Horror 20 : In the House of the Seven Librarians - Ellen Klages Year's Best Fantasy and Horror 20 : Drowning Palmer - Sarah Monette Year's Best Fantasy and Horror 20 : Landfill - Joyce Carol Oates Year's Best Fantasy and Horror 20 : Another Word for Map is Faith - Christopher Rowe Year's Best Fantasy.

Start by marking The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror .

Start by marking The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror: Eighteenth Annual Collection as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. For more than a decade, readers have turned to The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror to find the most rewarding fantastic short stories.

They have published the zine Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet ( tiny but celebrated --The Washington Post) for seven years. Stories from the collection have won the Nebula, Tiptree, and World Fantasy Awards. Her most recent short stories have appeared in The Dark and The Faery Reel.

Year's Best Fantasy and Horror was a reprint anthology published annually by St. Martin's Press from 1987 to 2008. The first two anthologies were originally published under the name The Year's Best Fantasy before the title was changed beginning with the third book.

packager of The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror.

Ellen Datlow, E. Michael Lewis, Richard Bowes, Steve Duffy, William Browning Spencer, Glen Hirshberg, Trent Hergenrader, Nicholas Royle, Margaret Ronald, Laird Barron, Euan Harvey, Miranda Siemienowicz, Daniel Kaysen, JoSelle Vanderhooft, R. B. Russell, Graham Edwards, Joe R. Lansdale, Mike Allen, Margo Lanagan, Daniel LeMoal, Adam Golaski, Simon Bestwick The Best Horror of the Year – Volume One Acknowledgm. packager of The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror.

For more than a decade, readers have turned to The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror to find the most rewarding fantastic short stories.

by Ellen Datlow · William Gibson · Scott Baker · Connie Willis · Harlan Ellison · Larry Niven · Pat Murphy · Lewis Shiner · Bruce McAllister. For more than a decade, readers have turned to The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror to find the most rewarding fantastic short stories. Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling continue their critically acclaimed and award-winning tradition with another stunning col. Little Deaths. by Ellen Datlow · Harry Crews · Lucy Taylor · Clive Barker.

The Year's Best Science Fiction: Eighteenth Annual Collection.

book by Gregory Maguire. The Year's Best Science Fiction: Eighteenth Annual Collection.

The fourteenth annual collection of the best short fantasy and horror fiction presents an ecclectic assortment of works by a wide variety of. .3rd- annual collection.

The fourteenth annual collection of the best short fantasy and horror fiction presents an ecclectic assortment of works by a wide variety of authors.

For more than a decade, readers have turned to The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror to find the most rewarding fantastic short stories. Ellen Datlow, Kelly Link, and Gavin Grant continue this critically acclaimed and award-winning tradition with another stunning collection of stories. The fiction and poetry here is culled from an exhaustive survey of the field, nearly four dozen stories ranging from fairy tales to gothic horror, from magic realism to dark tales in the Grand Guignol style. Rounding out the volume are the editors’ invaluable overviews of the year in fantasy and horror, and sections on comics, by Charles Vess; on anime and manga, by Joan D. Vinge; on media, by Ed Bryant; and on music, by Charles de Lint. With a long list of Honorable Mentions, this is an indispensable reference as well as the best reading available in fantasy and horror.

Comments

Bele Bele
I've been a fan of The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror for a number of years now. I like the idea of short stories because they are quicker for me to get through. I also love fantasy and horror and The Year's Best never fails to please me with the range of stories and authors. While there may be stories I don't particularly care for, there are always more stories that I do enjoy.
Doomblade Doomblade
Something like 15 years ago, I ran across the first three annual volumes of this anthology at a science fiction and fantasy bookstore. Ever since, I've eagerly looked forward to every volume, for weeks or months ahead of publication. Once received, each yielded a couple of weeks of daily reading treat. I admit, since I dislike horror, I've always wished that the horror had been spun off into a separate volume. Still, Ellen Datlow's taste in horror is pretty sophisticated, some of it being closer to dark fantasy, which I do like. I always read the horror last. But Terri Windling's fantasy selection more than made up for the horror content of the volume. All those stories culled from "literary" magazines I never read (as being too modern and New-Yorky) for my taste. And her roundups/brief reviews of new fantasy books! I've discovered so many "mainstream" books and authors not marketed as fantasy from Windling's reviews. Since the inception of Amazon, every roundup had me rushing to put at least ten more books in my shopping cart.

Unfortunately, this is probably the last annual volume I'll ever buy. The new team editing the fantasy content, Kelly Link and Gavin Grant, just are not up to Windling's standards. First, in both the story selection and the roundups, it seems that they did not read nearly as wide a range of sources as Windling did. Second, their selections were lackluster. The stories I really liked I'd already read in major fantasy magazines. The others were . . . sort of all right. Mildly interesting. But not worth that many pages. I discovered one book worth buying in the review roundups, which were also lackluster.

All in all, the uninteresting fantasy combined with that much horror, meant that the two weeks' delight I'd experienced for so many years, turned into a month-long slog, with me frequently counting stories (I don't read them in order) to see if I was finally almost done with the thing yet.

Let's hope there's another change of editors soon. And maybe, just maybe, they'll put the horror in a separate anthology, where it belongs.
Bludsong Bludsong
This book has an amazing collection of great stories that can be read on lunch. Thank you
Arryar Arryar
The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror: Eighteenth Annual Collection collects the best (as determined by the editors) short fiction of both genres in 2004, using wide definitions of the genres in order to build a diverse, quality collection. Introductions of middling quality summarize the year in fantasy, horror, and related media, but the bulk of the book is 44 short stories and poems which span paranormal horror to imaginary world fantasy. For a change, the horror selections are the volume's strength; some of the fantasy is quite good, but there are too many duds. All in all, a successful installment in the series, but the fantasy selections want for Windling's keener eye. Recommended.

It takes a too long for this installment to warm up: the first few selections, both fantasy and horror, are either over the top or unremarkable. Miéville's "Reports of Certain Events in London" is the tenth selection and the turning point. A unique, haunting story in its own right, the overall quality of the selections that follows is an improvement. There are still some disappointments, but a number of the stories and poems in this installment are wonderful, most of them in the second half of the volume: along with Miéville's story, Palahniuk's "Guts," Oates's "Stripping," Lanagan's "Singing My Sister Down," Eekhout's "Tales from the City of Seams," and Smith's "The Specialist" were my favorites. Unusual for the Year's Best Fantasy and Horror series (at least what I've read of it so far), many of the volume's better selections are horror. Link and Grant are competent but not exceptional editors, and their selections are likewise; the fantasy selections wants for Windling's influence. But Datlow is in top form, or perhaps it was a good year for horror: for a change, her selections are generally strong and sometimes exceptional.

Accompanying the stories are 2004 overviews in fantasy, horror, and related media. Link and Grant's opinionated overview is unremarkable, Datlow's overview is as always overlong and undiscriminating, and the media summaries are lengthy, informal, and often stray from their fantasy/horror purview. Nevertheless the volume can be a useful resource: skim the overviews, or draw author names from your favorite short stories, and you may discover new writers and new texts to read. All in all, this eighteenth volume is a fairly successful installment of The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror series. Some selections are distinct disappointments, but the overall quality is middling to high and the handful of wonderful selections make the volume worthwhile on the whole. I recommend it.