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eBook Engendering Rome: Women in Latin Epic (Roman Literature and its Contexts) ePub

eBook Engendering Rome: Women in Latin Epic (Roman Literature and its Contexts) ePub

by A. M. Keith

  • ISBN: 052155621X
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: A. M. Keith
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (March 28, 2000)
  • Pages: 162
  • ePub book: 1545 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1912 kb
  • Other: doc txt docx lrf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 468

Description

Its five chapters argue that the feminized landscapes, militaristic women, and beautiful female corpses of the Roman epic tradition should be interpreted in conjunction with the use of the genre by ancient educators as a means of inculcating Roman codes of masculinity and femininity in their.

Its five chapters argue that the feminized landscapes, militaristic women, and beautiful female corpses of the Roman epic tradition should be interpreted in conjunction with the use of the genre by ancient educators as a means of inculcating Roman codes of masculinity and femininity in their pupils. The issues addressed are of interest not just to classicists but also to students of later poetic traditions and to those pursuing gender studies. Categories: Literature\Literary. Publisher: Cambridge University Press.

Women Writers in Antiquity - SnyderJane McIntosh: The Woman and the Lyre: Women Writers in Classical Greece and Rome. Ad Feminam: Women and Literature. Pp. xvi+199; 1 map, Carbondale, Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press, 1989. Volume 40 Issue 2 - Maria Wyke.

Part of Cambridge's recent "Roman Literature and Its Contexts" series, this small but rich volume investigates not .

Part of Cambridge's recent "Roman Literature and Its Contexts" series, this small but rich volume investigates not only "big-name" Latin authors, such as Lucretius, Vergil, and Ovid, but lesser-known or fragmentary writers such as Valerius Flaccus, Statius, and Livius Andronicus to explore the "gendering" of Latin epic. Keith compares these literary furies with the historical women of the period, including Cleopatra and Fulvia, who figured prominently in anti-Antony propaganda in the years before Actium.

Home Browse Books Book details, Engendering Rome: Women in Latin Epic. Women And Literature-Rome. Sex Role In Literature. Engendering Rome: Women in Latin Epic. This study examines the role of female characters in the Roman epic poetry of Virgil, Ovid and other writers. Its five chapters argue that the feminized landscapes, militaristic women, and beautiful female corpses of the Roman epic tradition should be interpreted in conjunction with the use of the genre by ancient educators as a means of inculcating Roman codes of masculinity and femininity in their pupils.

Engendering Rome: Women in Latin Epic (Roman Literature and its Contexts). This study represents an attempt to restore female characters to visibility in Roman epic and to examine the discursive operations that effect their marginalisation within both the genre and the critical tradition it has given rise to. The five chapters can be read either as self-contained essays or as a cumulative exploration of the gender dynamics of the Roman epic tradition. The issues addressed are of interest not just to classicists but also to students of gender studies.

Published online: 02 December 2009. Heroism has long been recognised by readers and critics of Roman epic as a central theme of the genre from Virgil and Ovid to Lucan and Statius

Published online: 02 December 2009. Heroism has long been recognised by readers and critics of Roman epic as a central theme of the genre from Virgil and Ovid to Lucan and Statius. However the crucial role female characters play in the constitution and negotiation of the heroism on display in epic has received scant attention in the critical literature.

Literary Literary Criticism Literary Criticism & Collections Literature Literature & Fiction. The Play of Fictions: Studies in Ovid's Metamorphoses Book 2 (Michigan Monographs in Classical Antiquity).

The beginning of Latin literature dates to 240 BC, when the first stage play was performed in Rome. Latin literature would flourish for the next six centuries. The classical era of Latin literature can be roughly divided into the following periods: Early Latin literature, The Golden Age, The Imperial Period and Late Antiquity.

This study examines the role of female characters in the Roman epic poetry of Virgil, Ovid and other writers. Its five chapters argue that the feminized landscapes, militaristic women, and beautiful female corpses of the Roman epic tradition should be interpreted in conjunction with the use of the genre by ancient educators as a means of inculcating Roman codes of masculinity and femininity in their pupils. The issues addressed are of interest not just to classicists but also to students of later poetic traditions and to those pursuing gender studies.