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eBook The Narrative of Sojourner Truth (Large Print Edition) ePub

eBook The Narrative of Sojourner Truth (Large Print Edition) ePub

by Sojourner Truth,Olive Gilbert

  • ISBN: 0554264404
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Sojourner Truth,Olive Gilbert
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: BiblioLife; Large type / large print edition edition (August 18, 2008)
  • Pages: 124
  • ePub book: 1423 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1360 kb
  • Other: docx rtf mobi lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 550

Description

Sojourner Truth (/soʊˈdʒɜːrnər ˈtruːθ/; born Isabella Baumfree; c. 1797 – November 26, 1883) was an African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist.

Sojourner Truth (/soʊˈdʒɜːrnər ˈtruːθ/; born Isabella Baumfree; c. Truth was born into slavery in Swartekill, Ulster County, New York, but escaped with her infant daughter to freedom in 1826. After going to court to recover her son in 1828, she became the first black woman to win such a case against a white man.

THE following is the unpretending narrative of the life of a remarkable and meritorious woman–a life which has been checkered by strange vicissitudes, severe hardships, and singular adventures. Born a slave, and held in that brutal condition until the entire abolition of slavery in the State of New York in 1827, she has known what it is to drink to the dregs the bitterest cup of human degradation.

Truth's narrative is a powerful rendering of bondage, denial, and loss transcended by genius, family, and a. .

Truth's narrative is a powerful rendering of bondage, denial, and loss transcended by genius, family, and a spiritual base. It juxtaposes spirituality with moral turpitude. Additionally, Sojourner was a very religious woman, and spirituality plays a necessary and immediate role in this book, as it did in the lives of many people who lived in these times. When I told her about Sojourner Truth, she was shocked that there were slaves in the North.

Abolitionist and women's rights activist Sojourner Truth is best known for her speech on.

Abolitionist and women's rights activist Sojourner Truth is best known for her speech on racial inequalities, "Ain't I a Woman?" delivered at the Ohio Women's Rights Convention in 1851. Truth’s memoirs were published under the title The Narrative of Sojourner Truth: A Northern Slave in 1850. Truth dictated her recollections to a friend, Olive Gilbert, since she could not read or write. Garrison wrote the book's preface. Download biography's sojourner truth fact card.

LibriVox recording of The Narrative of Sojourner Truth, by Olive Gilbert Since Sojourner could neither read or write, she dictated her story to Olive Gilbert after they met at a Women’s Rights rally.

LibriVox recording of The Narrative of Sojourner Truth, by Olive Gilbert  . We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff. Since Sojourner could neither read or write, she dictated her story to Olive Gilbert after they met at a Women’s Rights rally. The Narrative was first published in 1850, and was widely distributed by the Abolitionist Movement.

This narrative, as told by Sojourner Truth to her friend Olive Gilbert, recounts to.The voice of Olive Gilbert comes through in this narrative, and together, she and Sojourner Truth build a compelling case against slavery. Summary by Holly Jenson. This is a Librivox recording.

This narrative, as told by Sojourner Truth to her friend Olive Gilbert, recounts to the best of her recollection what she and her family endured while they were the legal property of other human beings. These life experiences served as the catalysts for her becoming, in her later years, an outspoken abolutionist and women's rights activist.

Narrative of Sojourner Truth book. Whatever, this book is not worth the paper it's printed on. Her speech 'Ain't I a Woman' is legendary. But there really is no mention of anything interesting in this book. The latter was Sojourner's scrapbook and autograph book she carried around as she traveled preaching and telling her story. My reaction Sojourner Truth had to be one of the most charismatic people ever to walk the Earth.

African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist, Sojourner Truth was born into slavery as Isabella . In 1850 William Lloyd Garrison privately published her book, The Narrative of Sojourner Truth: A Northern Slave.

African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist, Sojourner Truth was born into slavery as Isabella Baumfree in Swartekill, Ulster County, New York. During the Civil War, Truth helped recruit black troops for the Union Army and tried unsuccessfully, after the war, to secure federal land grants for former slaves. Sojourner died on November 26, 1883, at her home in Battle Creek, Michigan. The proceeds from the book, and subsequent speaking engagements, enabled her to purchase a home in Northampton.

Since Sojourner could neither read or write, she dictated her story to Olive Gilbert after they met at a Women’s Rights rally. It was one of the catalysts for the rise of anti-slavery public opinion in the years leading up to the Civil War.

Sojourner Truth was a former slave, abolitionist, preacher, and advocate of.

Sojourner Truth was a former slave, abolitionist, preacher, and advocate of women's rights. Learn more about her life and activism. She dictated her autobiography to women's rights activist Olive Gilbert and published it in Boston in 1850. Truth used the income from the book, "The Narrative of Sojourner Truth," to pay off her mortgage. In 1850, she also began speaking about women's suffrage. Her most famous speech, "Ain't I a Woman?," was given in 1851 at a women's rights convention in Ohio.

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

Comments

Mustard Forgotten Mustard Forgotten
Narrative of Sojourner Truth is an amazing book; It's the second of such narratives I have read. It seems poorly organized, but when one considers that this is a narrative of a lady who at a point in her life couldn't get her head around dates and numbers, one realizes it couldn't have been done better. Truth's narrative, like that of Frederick Douglas, gives me vicarious trauma of the appalling evil of slavery imposed on otherwise good people by a system so cunningly worked out to call out the brute in humanity. A system that now exists in a subtle form but not less efficacious: it has morphed from allowing people get away with murder without reason at all to allowing people get away with murder with trifle reason.
Stonewing Stonewing
Started this book a couple of weeks ago, I'm not an avid reader (specially of the conventional kind). E-books are my ideal reading, Sorry. Beautiful story, thought provoking, heart-wrenching. The separation of families, the chattel system, the cruelty on a subhuman level is just a few ways of describing 'Sojourner Truth'. Worth reading it over and over again,
Lavivan Lavivan
A powerful and emotional reading experience, one that should be required reading in Middle School, as I agree with one reviewer's post.

Sojourner Truth was born into slavery in the northern state of New York around 1800, and escaped into freedom a year before the state abolished slavery within its borders. Her given name was Isabella Baumfree, and she changed her name to Sojourner during her travels. An abolitionist, women's rights activists, itinerant preacher, she's an extremely important figure for this period of American history. And, her story is both brutal and inspiring. Brutal, because the nature of slavery is just inhuman, and inspiring, because her personal connection with God and Jesus served as a source of strength for her her entire life.

There are many notable things from this biography for me. First, Sojourner was illiterate, as many blacks and women were during her time. This is not her autobiography, so do not come to this book expecting her words. The book is written by Sojourner's friend Olive Gilbert, who wrote from Sojourner's dictation of her memoirs. As such, there is much of Gilbert in the writing, as is to be expected. Additionally, Sojourner was a very religious woman, and spirituality plays a necessary and immediate role in this book, as it did in the lives of many people who lived in these times.

I picked up this book because I was inspired by my 4th grade daughter's book - in her social studies section of class, she is reading Freedom Crossing, a fictional account of the Underground Railroad. When I told her about Sojourner Truth, she was shocked that there were slaves in the North. And that when they were freed, the majority were left to starvation and destitution. I hope she picks up this narrative at some time in the next few years. I know I will encourage her in that regard.
Urllet Urllet
What a sad, yet uplifting, story of Sojourner Truth's life. And let us not forget these words of the narrator who wrote this book:

"O the 'fantastic tricks' which the American people are 'playing before high Heaven!' O their profane use of the sacred name of Liberty! O their impious appeal to the God of the oppressed, for his divine benediction while they are making merchandise of his image! Do they not blush? Nay, they glory in their shame! Once a year they take special pains to exhibit themselves to the world in all their republican deformity and Christian barbarity, insanely supposing that they thus excite the envy, admiration and applause of mankind. The nations are looking at the dreadful spectacle with disgust and amazement. However sunken and degraded they may be, they are too elevated, too virtuous, too humane to be guilty of such conduct. Their voice is heard, saying–'Americans! we hear your boasts of liberty, your shouts of independence, your declarations of hostility to every form of tyranny, your assertions that all men are created free and equal, and endowed by their Creator with an inalienable right to liberty, the merry peal of your bells, and the deafening roar of your artillery; but, mingling with all these, and rising above them all, we also hear the clanking of chains! the shrieks and wailings of millions of your own countrymen, whom you wickedly hold in a state of slavery as much more frightful than the oppression which your fathers resisted unto blood, as the tortures of the Inquisition surpass the stings of an insect!"
Saberdragon Saberdragon
I had enjoyed reading about this true account of how she worked through difficulties while trying to become a free woman, and yet she still endeavored to make a number of her own amazing accomplishments which inspired me. Totally worth getting this for my Kindle!
Zeks Horde Zeks Horde
So fascinating to read a slice of history! This is Sojourner Truth's narrative of her own life. She was illiterate, so someone else wrote down her words. She carried this slight book with her to sell when she toured the country speaking about the ills of slavery and about women's rights. So many authors have written about Sojourner Truth, but there's nothing like hearing a person's own words.
Scream_I LOVE YOU Scream_I LOVE YOU
Excellent narrative providing insight into both insight into both the subject of 19th century slavery and into the nature of American religion in New York and the surrounding states at that time. A necessary primary resource for understanding early 19th century America in the north states.
While I knew the name of Sojourner Truth, I knew little about her. This contemporaneous account of her life reveals a woman who had had an encounter with God that changed and shaped the rest of her life. In spite of the injustice of slavery she devoted her days to sharing the love and knowledge of God.