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eBook Rewriting Shakespeare, Rewriting Ourselves ePub

eBook Rewriting Shakespeare, Rewriting Ourselves ePub

by Peter Erickson

  • ISBN: 0520074459
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Peter Erickson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of California Press (October 18, 1991)
  • Pages: 228
  • ePub book: 1660 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1637 kb
  • Other: azw rtf txt docx
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 426

Description

Rewriting Shakespeare, Rewriting Ourselves book.

Rewriting Shakespeare, Rewriting Ourselves book.

book by Peter Erickson.

In this challenging study, Peter Erickson insists on bringing the two realms together. He asks: what impact does a revision of the literary canon have on Shakespeare's status?

In this challenging study, Peter Erickson insists on bringing the two realms together. He asks: what impact does a revision of the literary canon have on Shakespeare's status? -. - Publisher description. Includes bibliographical references (pages 177-222) and index.

Rewriting Shakespeare, Rewriting Ourselves. Similar books and articles. Rewriting the Word American Women Writers and the Bible. This article has no associated abstract. Shakespeare, William Feminism and literature Sex role in literature Women and literature Women in literature. Penny Gay & Taylor & Francis - 1994. Transforming Shakespeare Contemporary Women's Re-Visions in Literature and Performance. Marianne Novy - 2000. Amy Benson Brown - 1999. Added to PP index 2015-02-02. Total views 0. Recent downloads (6 months) 0.

Rewriting Shakespeare, Rewriting Ourselves by Dr. Peter B. Erickson '67 View author page View an profile Univ. of California Press; 1991; 228 pp. Genre: Non-fiction Category: Shakespeare Additional Information - Library Catalog. Amherst College 220 South Pleasant Street Amherst, MA 01002.

Peter Erickson: Publications. Rewriting Shakespeare, Rewriting Ourselves (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991). Citing Shakespeare: The Reinterpretation of Race in Contemporary Literature and Art (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007). Reprinted in: Fred Wilson: A Critical Reader, ed. Doro Globus (London: Ridinghouse, 2011), 199-219. Reprinted in: Shakespearean Criticism 55 (Detroit: Gale, 2000), 101-109; Poetry Criticism 32 (Detroit: Gale, 2001), 18-23; Shakespeare’s Problem Plays, ed. Simon Barker (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2005), 54-73.

Rewriting Shakespeare, rewriting ourselves, Peter Erickson. London : University of California Press, c1991. Erickson, Peter Hunt, Maurice. Citing Shakespeare : the reinterpretation of race in contemporary literature and art, Peter Erickson. Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. Patriarchal structures in Shakespeare's drama, Peter Erickson.

Peter Erickson (e., Rewriting Shakespeare, Rewriting Ourselves (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991)Google Scholar. Marlon B. Ross, The Contours of Masculine Desire: Romanticism and the Rise of Women’s Poetry (New York: Oxford University Press, 1989). Ellen Donkin, Getting into the Act: Women Playwrights in London 1776–1829 (London: Routledge, 1995)Google Scholar. Online ISBN 978-1-349-26003-4. eBook Packages Palgrave Literature & Performing Arts Collection. Personalised recommendations.

Early Modern Visual Culture Representation, Race, and Empire in Renaissance England. 408 pages 7 x 10 133 illus. Peter Erickson, of the Clark Art Institute, is author of Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare's Drama and Rewriting Shakespeare, Rewriting Ourselves. Berkeley and Los Angeles :University of California Press. Shakespeare’s Literary Lives: The Author as Character in Fiction and Film. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Holbrook, Peter and Edmondson, Paul, eds. (2016). Shakespeare’s Creative Legacies. London: Bloomsbury/Arden.

Participants in the current debate about the literary canon generally separate the established literary order—of which Shakespeare is the most visible icon—from the emergent minority literatures. In this challenging study, Peter Erickson insists on bringing the two realms together. He asks: what impact does a revision of the literary canon have on Shakespeare's status?Part One of his book is about Shakespeare on women. In analyses of several Shakespearean works, Erickson discusses Shakespeare's ambivalence about women as a reflection of male anxiety about the cultural authority of Queen Elizabeth. Part Two is about (contemporary) women on Shakespeare. Erickson discusses Adrienne Rich's revision of the very concept of canon and discusses how several African-American women writers (in particular Maya Angelou and Gloria Naylor) have reflected on the ambivalent status of Shakespeare in their worlds.Erickson here offers a model for multicultural literary criticism and a new conceptual framework with which to discuss issues of identity politics. Rewriting Shakespeare, Rewriting Ourselves makes an important contribution to the national debate about educational policy in the humanities.