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eBook Down for the Count: A Prison Library Handbook ePub

eBook Down for the Count: A Prison Library Handbook ePub

by Brenda Vogel

  • ISBN: 0810829274
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Brenda Vogel
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Scarecrow Press (March 1995)
  • Pages: 206
  • ePub book: 1205 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1317 kb
  • Other: lrf rtf mbr lrf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 682

Description

Brenda Vogel examines all aspects of establishing prison library service.

Brenda Vogel examines all aspects of establishing prison library service. Vogel's Down for the Count is the better of the two. Rhea Rubin's Libraries Inside: A Practical Guide for Prison Librarians (Professional Reading, LJ 4/1/95) covers the same material but comes up with conflicting solutions

Down for the Count book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Down for the Count book. This is a practical, gritty guide to prison librarianship. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Down for the Count: A Prison Library Handbook as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In The Prison Library Primer: A Program for the Twenty-First Century, Brenda Vogel addresses the unique challenges facing the prison librarian. This volume also includes an information-skills training curriculum, sample administration policies, essential digital and print sources, and community support resources.

In Down for the count: A prison library handbook (pp. 31-43). Metuchen, NJ: The Scarecrow Press. Covering all aspects of establishing, developing, or providing a prison library service, Brenda Vogel describes procedures and models to help any librarian overcome the often-negative reactions of outreach to the incarcerated.

Brenda Vogel examines all aspects of establishing prison library service, describing process models and procedures that can result in overcoming negative sentiment. The book is rich in detail, including examples of prison library regulation, state prison library standards, recommended readings, and a list of advocacy organizations. An outline of a clerical training program for inmate assistants and a user satisfaction survey are also included

Bringing Libraries and Books Closer to Children during the War . The book remains an irreplaceable Down for the Count: A Prison Library Handbook by Brenda Vogel.

Bringing Libraries and Books Closer to Children during the War – UNICEF projects in Croatia. The book remains an irreplaceable. Down for the Count: A Prison Library Handbook by Brenda Vogel.

a prison library handbook. Published 1995 by Scarecrow Press in Metuchen, . There's no description for this book yet.

In The Prison Library Primer: A Program for the Twenty-First Century, Brenda Vogel addresses . Equipped with practical library science tools and creative solutions, The Prison Library Primer is an invaluable resource that will help the librarian and library advocate develop, grow, and maintain an effective, user-centered library program.

Prison libraries are provided in many prisons. Reading materials and information are provided in almost all federal and state correctional facilities in the United States. Libraries in federal prisons are controlled by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, . Department of Justice. State prison libraries are controlled by each state's own department of corrections. Many local jails also provide library services through partnerships with local public libraries and community organizations.

Down for the Count: A Prison Library Handbook. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow Press. Third World Libraries, 5(2), 74-75. Yamaguchi, A. (2002). Toshokan Zasshi (The Library Journal), 96, 761-763. Filiaal zonder collectives: Penitentiaire inrichting besteedt bibliotheekwerk uit aan OB Lelystad. Bibliotheek en Samenleving, 24(3), 15-20. Werner’s Manual for Prison Law Libraries.

This is a practical, gritty guide to prison librarianship. Brenda Vogel examines all aspects of establishing prison library service, describing process models and procedures that can result in overcoming negative sentiment. The book is rich in detail, including examples of prison library regulation, state prison library standards, recommended readings, and a list of advocacy organizations. An outline of a clerical training program for inmate assistants and a user satisfaction survey are also included.Whether the reader is a librarian, a prison official, a public policy maker, or an architect designing or renovating a prison facility, Vogel's guidebook is a bold, thoughtful, and provocative work that is essential reading for developing, establishing and providing library service in a prison.

Comments

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In this highly readable, passionate account of applying library science principles in a correctional setting, Ms.Vogel has performed an invaluable service to librarians and the inmates they work with. She describes lucidly the struggles librarians have had with uninterested and even hostile correctional professionals, and she presents constructive solutions. She details the problems of working with inmates, including the behaviors to watch out for. The book goes into the dilemma of preserving the principles of freedom of information while still adhering to rules that restrict inmates from acquiring "dangerous" knowledge (for example, texts that describe how locks function). Concise yet complete descriptions are given of prison library history and the research (or unfortunate dearth of it) that has gone into this vital but neglected area of librarianship. There is an extensive bibliography of useful sources. The need for legal as well as leisure reading sources is covered well. Vogel is perhaps too pessimistic about the library's role in providing rehabilitation, although those of us who have been exposed to the politics of correctional institutions can see why she would have this point of view. But Down For The Count is on the whole a landmark work that underscores why prison libraries must be grounded in the major principles of library science. It is an essential work that should be read not just by prison librarians but anyone truly interested in advancing correctional education.
Ximinon Ximinon
What is it like to work in a prison library? To stock books inmates will read? To navigate the miserable politics within prison systems? Brenda Vogel covers those issues and more. Invaluable for current librarians and a terrific guide for future ones. I wish that she could update the book every two years or so--are things changing? Is there more hope out there than she had when she drafted this book?