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eBook Sexuality and Citizenship: Metamorphosis in Elizabethan Erotic Verse ePub

eBook Sexuality and Citizenship: Metamorphosis in Elizabethan Erotic Verse ePub

by Jim Ellis

  • ISBN: 0802087353
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Jim Ellis
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; 2nd ed. edition (August 21, 2003)
  • Pages: 272
  • ePub book: 1461 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1666 kb
  • Other: rtf lrf docx azw
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 881

Description

Jim Ellis provides detailed readings of fifteen examples of the epyllion, considering the poems in their cultural milieu and arguing that these myths of the transformations of young men are at the same time stories of sexual, social, and political metamorphoses

Jim Ellis provides detailed readings of fifteen examples of the epyllion, considering the poems in their cultural milieu and arguing that these myths of the transformations of young men are at the same time stories of sexual, social, and political metamorphoses.

Sexuality and Citizenship book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Sexuality and Citizenship: Metamorphosis in Elizabethan Erotic Verse as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Based for the most part on Ovid's Metamorphoses, epyllia retell. Start by marking Sexuality and Citizenship: Metamorphosis in Elizabethan Erotic Verse as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Jim Ellis provides detailed readings of fifteen examples of the epyllion, considering the poems in their cultural milieu and arguing that these myths of the transformations of young men are at the same time stories of sexual, social, and political metamorphoses

Jim Ellis provides detailed readings of fifteen examples of the epyllion, considering the poems in their cultural milieu and arguing that these myths of the transformations of young men are at the same time stories of sexual, social, and political metamorphoses.

Jim Ellis provides detailed readings of fifteen examples of the epyllion .

Jim Ellis provides detailed readings of fifteen examples of the epyllion, considering the poems in their cultural milieu and arguing that these myths of the transformations of young men are at the same time stories of sexual, social, and political metamorphoses. eISBN: 978-1-4426-7986-3.

The circulation of erotic verse within a homosocial literary network in which only male readers were expected to participate .

The circulation of erotic verse within a homosocial literary network in which only male readers were expected to participate has encouraged scholars to identify homoerotic tensions in these poems, and beautiful adolescent boys certainly feature frequently. However, there are moments in Elizabethan erotic verse when conquest is denied and the model of male sexual dominance breaks down, as in Marlowe’s vernacular translation of Ovid’s Amores (first published 1599).

He is the author of Sexuality and Citizenship: Metamorphosis in Elizabethan Erotic Verse. I met Derek Jarman a few times and have always loved his work particularly his movies and books. It was his uncompromising vision and the way he fashioned his own life that made seem him so interesting. I have watched his movies, over and over again, and always find myself returning to his wonderful books that weave memories, thoughts and ideas on the sixties, seventies, eighties and early nineties.

Sexuality and Citizenship : Metamorphosis in Elizabethan Erotic Verse. Based for the most part on Ovid's Metamorphoses, epyllia retell stories of the dalliances of gods and mortals, most often concerning the transformation of beautiful youths. This short-lived genre flourished and died in England in the 1590s. It was produced mainly by and for the young men of the Inns of Court, where the ambitious came to study law and to sample the pleasures London had to offer.

Elizabethan literature refers to bodies of work produced during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558–1603), and is one of the most splendid ages of English literature. Elizabeth I presided over a vigorous culture that saw notable accomplishments in the arts, voyages of discovery, the "Elizabethan Settlement" that created the Church of England, and the defeat of military threats from Spain.

In his works, for example in Macbeth, Shakespeare both reflects and disputes gender stereotypes through the presentation of his characters, some of whom accept and reproduce the stereotypes which define and accompany normal human behavior, like Macduff and Lady Macduff in Macbeth, whereas some others reject them through adopting characteristics that normally belong to the opposite sex, like Macbeth and Lady Macbeth in.

Based for the most part on Ovid's Metamorphoses, epyllia retell stories of the dalliances of gods and mortals, most often concerning the transformation of beautiful youths. This short-lived genre flourished and died in England in the 1590s. It was produced mainly by and for the young men of the Inns of Court, where the ambitious came to study law and to sample the pleasures London had to offer. Jim Ellis provides detailed readings of fifteen examples of the epyllion, considering the poems in their cultural milieu and arguing that these myths of the transformations of young men are at the same time stories of sexual, social, and political metamorphoses.

Examining both the most famous (Shakespeare's Venus and Adonis and Marlowe's Hero and Leander) and some of the more obscure examples of the genre (Hiren, the Fair Greek and The Metamorphosis of Tabacco), Ellis moves from considering fantasies of selfhood, through erotic relations with others, to literary affiliation, political relations, and finally to international issues such as exploration, settlement, and trade. Offering a revisionist account of the genre of the epyllion, Ellis transforms theories of sexuality, literature, and politics of the Elizabethan age, making an erudite and intriguing contribution to the field.