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eBook Slavery and the Romantic Imagination ePub

eBook Slavery and the Romantic Imagination ePub

by Debbie Lee

  • ISBN: 081223636X
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Debbie Lee
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press (January 3, 2002)
  • Pages: 312
  • ePub book: 1772 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1482 kb
  • Other: azw doc rtf txt
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 994

Description

Debbie Lee teaches English at Washington State University.

Debbie Lee teaches English at Washington State University. Paperback: 312 pages. Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press (February 27, 2004). Библиографические данные. Slavery and the Romantic Imagination. Debbie Lee. Издание: перепечатанное.

Among the most significant, Debbie Lee contends, was the change it wrought to insular Britons' ability to distance themselves from the brutalities of chattel slavery.

Selected by Choice magazine as an Outstanding Academic Title The Romantic movement had profound social implications for nineteenth-century British culture. Among the most significant, Debbie Lee contends, was the change it wrought to insular Britons' ability to distance themselves from the brutalities of chattel slavery.

Among the most significant, Debbie Lee contends, was . In dealing with the Romantic period, this question becomes more specific: what is the relationship between the nation's greatest writers and the epic violence of slavery?

Among the most significant, Debbie Lee contends, was the change it wrought to insular Britons' ability to distance themselves from the brutalities of chattel slavery.

Slavery and the Romantic Imagination. British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism. Afr Am Rev. Jack Stillinger. Coming Home: The Public Spaces of Romantic War. Article. Blind Memory: Visual Representations of Slavery in England and America, 1780-1865.

Rather than categorizing Romantic literature as resistant to, complicit with, or ambivalent about the workings of empire, Slavery and the Romantic Imagination views the creative process in light of the developing concept o. .

Rather than categorizing Romantic literature as resistant to, complicit with, or ambivalent about the workings of empire, Slavery and the Romantic Imagination views the creative process in light of the developing concept of empathy. Books : SLAVERY & THE ROMANTIC IMAGINATION. We're committed to providing low prices every day, on everything.

Chicago Distribution Center. Blake, Hegel, and the Sciences. Interfusing Living and Nonliving in Charlotte Smith’s Beachy Head. 1427 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637. The University of Chicago Press Books.

Beloved is a 1987 novel by the American writer Toni Morrison

Beloved is a 1987 novel by the American writer Toni Morrison. Set after the American Civil War (1861–65), it is inspired by the life of Margaret Garner, an African American who escaped slavery in Kentucky in late January 1856 by crossing the Ohio River to Ohio, a free state. Captured, she killed her child rather than have her taken back into slavery.

Literature, science and exploration in the Romantic era : bodies of knowledge, Tim Fulford, Debbie Lee and Peter J. Kitson. by: Fulford, Tim, 1962- Published: (2004). Physiology and the literary imagination : Romantic to modern, John Gordon. by: Gordon, John, 1945- Published: (2003). Romantic imperialism : universal empire and the culture of modernity, Saree Makdisi. by: Makdisi, Saree, Published: (1998).

Winner of the 2003 Susanne M. Glasscock Humanities Book Prize for Interdisciplinary Scholarship

Selected by Choice magazine as an Outstanding Academic Title

The Romantic movement had profound social implications for nineteenth-century British culture. Among the most significant, Debbie Lee contends, was the change it wrought to insular Britons' ability to distance themselves from the brutalities of chattel slavery. In the broadest sense, she asks what the relationship is between the artist and the most hideous crimes of his or her era. In dealing with the Romantic period, this question becomes more specific: what is the relationship between the nation's greatest writers and the epic violence of slavery? In answer, Slavery and the Romantic Imagination provides a fully historicized and theorized account of the intimate relationship between slavery, African exploration, "the Romantic imagination," and the literary works produced by this conjunction.

Though the topics of race, slavery, exploration, and empire have come to shape literary criticism and cultural studies over the past two decades, slavery has, surprisingly, not been widely examined in the most iconic literary texts of nineteenth-century Britain, even though emancipation efforts coincide almost exactly with the Romantic movement. This study opens up new perspectives on Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Shelley, Keats, and Mary Prince by setting their works in the context of political writings, antislavery literature, medicinal tracts, travel writings, cartography, ethnographic treatises, parliamentary records, philosophical papers, and iconography.