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eBook The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri: Volume 1: Inferno (Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri Vol. 1) ePub

eBook The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri: Volume 1: Inferno (Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri Vol. 1) ePub

by Dante Alighieri,Robert Turner,Ronald L. Martinez,Robert M. Durling

  • ISBN: 0195087402
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Dante Alighieri,Robert Turner,Ronald L. Martinez,Robert M. Durling
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (February 29, 1996)
  • Pages: 672
  • ePub book: 1502 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1518 kb
  • Other: mobi doc txt mbr
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 870

Description

Book 1 of 3 in the Divine Comedy Series. As Durling and Martinez complete their monumental three-volume presentation of Dante's masterpiece, we can sense their triumph and elation, despite their characteristic modesty.

Book 1 of 3 in the Divine Comedy Series. This, after all, is the volume with which they can demonstrate the fullness and consistency of Dante's great project, its final approach to what they describe in one footnote as 'a pitch of intensity unique in all literature.

The second volume of Oxford's new Divine Comedy presents the Italian text of. .This publication of The Divine Comedy of Dante, Translated by . Cary, is a publication The Dev.

The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri: Volume 1: Inferno (Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri Reprint. 37 MB·1,824 Downloads·New! This new translation presents the Italian text of the Inferno, and, on facing pages, Robert. The second volume of Oxford's new Divine Comedy presents the Italian text of the Purgatorio. Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri, Volume 1. 673 Pages·2004·28. 53 MB·41,553 Downloads·New!

Dante Alighieri, The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri. Dante’s masterwork is a 3 volume work written in Italian rather than Latin.

Dante Alighieri, The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri. Vol. 1 (Inferno (Hell) describes what happens to the souls of the wicked who are condemned to suffer the torments of Hell.

Similar books and articles. Robert M. Durling - 1988 - Speculum 63 (3):623-624. Intorno Allo Spirito Religioso di Dante Alighieri Desunto Dalle Opere di Lui. The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri, A Verse Translation: "Purgatorio". Dante Alighieri, Allen Mandelbaum. The Moral System of Dante's Inferno. W. H. V. Reade - 1909 - Clarendon Press. L'etica Nicomachea E l'Ordinamento Morale Dell' Inferno di Dante. Giovanni Busnelli - 1907 - N. Zanichelli. Federigo Maria Zinelli - 1839 - Tip. Di F. Andreola.

By Dante Alighieri, Robert Turner, Robert M. Durling. This first volume of Robert Durling's new translation of The Divine Comedy brings a new power and accuracy to the rendering of Dante's extraordinary vision of Hell, with all its terror, pathos, and humor. The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - Vol. 1. By Dante Alighieri, Robert Turner, Robert M. Remarkably true to both the letter and spirit of this central work of Western literature, Durling's is a prose translation (the first to appear in twenty-five years), and is thus free of the exigencies of meter and rhyme that hamper recent verse translations.

Dante Alighieri Martinez' and Durling's Introduction and Notes are designed with the . Illustrations by ROBERT TURNER.

Martinez' and Durling's Introduction and Notes are designed with the first-time reader of the poem in mind, but will be useful to others as well.

The Divine Comedy, Vol. 1 book. Inferno (La Divina Commedia The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri: Volume 1: Inferno, Dante Alighieri The Divine Comedy is a long narrative poem by Dante Alighieri, begun c. 1308 and completed in 1320, a year before his death, in 1321. It is widely considered the preeminent work in Italian literature, and is seen as one of the greatest works of world literature.

Robert M. Durling is Professor Emeritus of Italian and English Literature at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His translation of Petrarch's Lyric Poetry (1976) has been widely acclaimed. Ronald L. Martinez is co-author, with Durling, of Time and the Crystal: Studies in Dante's 'Rime petrose' (1990) and has published articles on Dante, Boccaccio, Machiavelli, and Ariosto. Robert Turner has been a professional illustrator since 1979; he is employed as a graphic artist in archaeology at the Museum

The divine comedy: The inferno, The purgatorio, and The paradiso, Dante Alighieri; translated. But if the gold of Dante runs deep, it also runs right up to the surface

The divine comedy: The inferno, The purgatorio, and The paradiso, Dante Alighieri; translated. But if the gold of Dante runs deep, it also runs right up to the surface. A lifetime of devoted scholarship will not mine all that gold; yet enough lies on the surface-or just an inch below-to make a first reading a bonanza in itself. All one really needs is some first instruction in what to look for. Thereafter he need only follow the vein as it goes deeper and deeper into the core of things.

Robert Durling's spirited new prose translation of the Paradiso completes his masterful rendering of the Divine Comedy

Robert Durling's spirited new prose translation of the Paradiso completes his masterful rendering of the Divine Comedy. Durling's earlier translations of the Inferno and the Purgatorio garnered high praise, and with this superb version of the Paradiso readers can now traverse the entirety of Dante's epic poem of spiritual ascent with the guidance of one of the greatest living Italian-to-English translators

This first volume of Robert Durling's new translation of The Divine Comedy brings a new power and accuracy to the rendering of Dante's extraordinary vision of Hell, with all its terror, pathos, and humor. Remarkably true to both the letter and spirit of this central work of Western literature, Durling's is a prose translation (the first to appear in twenty-five years), and is thus free of the exigencies of meter and rhyme that hamper recent verse translations. As Durling notes, "the closely literal style is a conscious effort to convey in part the nature of Dante's Italian, notoriously craggy and difficult even for Italians." Rigorously accurate as to meaning, it is both clear and supple, while preserving to an unparalleled degree the order and emphases of Dante's complex syntax. The Durling-Martinez Inferno is also user-friendly. The Italian text, newly edited, is printed on each verso page; the English mirrors it in such a way that readers can easily find themselves in relation to the original terza rima. Designed with the first-time reader of Dante in mind, the volume includes comprehensive notes and textual commentary by Martinez and Durling: both are life-long students of Dante and other medieval writers (their Purgatorio and Paradiso will appear next year). Their introduction is a small masterpiece of its kind in presenting lucidly and concisely the historical and conceptual background of the poem. Sixteen short essays are provided that offer new inquiry into such topics as the autobiographical nature of the poem, Dante's views on homosexuality, and the recurrent, problematic body analogy (Hell has a structure parallel to that of the human body). The extensive notes, containing much new material, explain the historical, literary, and doctrinal references, present what is known about the damned souls Dante meets --from the lovers who spend eternity in the whirlwind of their passion, to Count Ugolino, who perpetually gnaws at his enemy's skull--disentangle the vexed party politics of Guelfs and Ghibellines, illuminate difficult and disputed passages, and shed light on some of Dante's unresolved conflicts. Robert Turner's illustrations include detailed maps of Italy and several of its regions, clearly labeled diagrams of the cosmos and the structure of Hell, and eight line drawings illustrating objects and places mentioned in the poem. With its exceptionally high standard of typography and design, the Durling-Martinez Inferno offers readers a solid cornerstone for any home library. It will set the standard for years to come.

Comments

Sagda Sagda
I can't comment on the "beauty" or "correctness" of the translation, as I do not have the proper knowledge of Italian, but I will comment on other aspects of this translation that I found particularly helpful.

My background: I read this edition as a part of Stanford's SLE (Structured Liberal Education) program, which is a comprehensive (or as comprehensive as you can get in one year) survey of western philosophy and literature.

This edition has copious notes after every Canto which flesh out the multifaceted complexity of the Inferno. After a single reading of a Canto not only do they help make sense of difficult passages (which of course, abound) but also reveal interprative difficulties which might be easily missed without the proper historical or literary background. These notes (many with references to further reading) cover a range of interpretations and expose the reader to common political, religious, and rhetorical readings.

This text also is printed so the English translation is opposite the original Italian on every page - particularly helpful for a close reading (even if the reader has little or no background in Italian).

I am continuing to read the rest of the Comedia in this translation because I found the Inferno so compelling.

Much like Dante the pilgrim cannot travel through hell alone and needs the assistance of Virgil, this translation guides the reader through the byzantine world of the literary Inferno - hopefully like Dante, to some (if limited) understanding.
Whitebinder Whitebinder
This is not as described. It is a translation by Longfellow, not Durling, and it does not have Italian on the facing pages, as some here describe. It isn't bad, but the translation is a bit dated, obviously, since it's by Longfellow, and it just wasn't what I expected. Also, it is a copy of a library book, so there are pencil marks and other stray markings on some of the pages. There are no illustrations. It is still a valuable historical artifact, but that isn't what I was looking for or what I expected. The description above should be corrected by Amazon.
Pruster Pruster
I was so excited to see this marvelous book ported to kindle I ordered a copy immediately. I love and cherish my physical book version The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri: Volume 1: Inferno (Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri Vol. 1)and could not wait to have it accessible at any time on my kindle. Unfortunately the formatting is horrendously dysfunctional. Since the text of the original Italian and the English translation are on facing pages they muddle into each other. Also this version has only location numbers and not the numbers of the text pages that so often accompany the text of other books. It would be really nice if these things could be fixed, making the kindle version as nice (i.e. useful) as the physical book.
Lestony Lestony
The Durling edition is a monument of scholarship. In addition the translation is notably lucid and (as far as a non-Italian speaker can discern) sensitive to the nuance of the orignal text. The translator consistently chooses renderings which convey the sense of the Italian as fully as possible in preference to rendering which are poetic or artful but don't do justice to the original sense. Personally I find this the most helpful approach. Additionally, the book is a deep well of background information which helps one understand more fully the context in which the text was written. Our book group chose this translation after consideration of the full range available and used it to work through the whole Commedia over some years, postponing consideration of Paradiso until Professor Durling's edition became available. We were extremely happy with it.
Vozilkree Vozilkree
The Durling-Martinez edition is the one used in my college Dante class. Together with their translation of Purgatorio (their edition of Paradiso apparently still in progress), the two works have great endnotes for every canto of the poem, good appendices and Purgatorio has a series of 'intercantica' notes which refer the reader to all the parallels between the two works, so you don't have to remember that the Gates of Hell and the Gates of Purgatory are found in Canto 9 of their respective works.

I wrote this review because the top reviews for this edition were all in fact for other editions, and this one definitely deserves its due. It may be more expensive than Mandelbaum's paperback, but its worth it. The print is larger, the language clearer, the notes more useful. Try it out.
Perilanim Perilanim
The best way to read inferno! Has the Italian and footnotes that describe the cultural context of every word at the time Dante wrote it! Definately recommend