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eBook Carnival Culture and the Soviet Modernist (St Antony's Series) ePub

eBook Carnival Culture and the Soviet Modernist (St Antony's Series) ePub

by Craig Brandist

  • ISBN: 0333668669
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Craig Brandist
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Humanity Press/prometheus Bk (November 8, 1996)
  • Pages: 280
  • ePub book: 1195 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1140 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi azw doc
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 415

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Craig Brandist (auth. Series: St Antony’s Series. File: PDF, 2. 0 MB. Читать онлайн.

Craig Brandist (auth. This book examines the work of five Soviet prose writers - Olesha, Platonov, Kharms, Bulgakov and Vaginov - in the light of the carnivalesque elements of Russian popular culture.

The subversive side of carnival culture and its influence on the modern novel has become well known with .

The subversive side of carnival culture and its influence on the modern novel has become well known with dissemination of the work of Mikhail Bakhtin in the West. II Carnival and the Soviet Modernist Novel 103 4 The Festive Revolutions of Yurii Olesha 105 5 Carnivalization and Populism in the Central Work of Andrei Platonov 135 6 Daniil Kharms, the Soviet Menippea and the 'Medieval' Grotesque 165 7 Bulgakov's Master and Margarita and the Devil's Carnival 196 8 A Note on Vaginov: The Novel as Compensatory Realm 221 9.

Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

File: PDF, . 5 MB. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Riklijevo atmosfersko zdravljenje. 2. Необратимые Явления в Спиновых Стеклах.

The subversive side of carnival culture and its influence on the modern novel has become well known with dissemination of. . In this study of the relationship between Russian popular culture and the work of five Soviet prose writers, Olesha, Platonov, Kharms, Bulgakov and Vaginov, Dr. Brandist shows that while in the late 1920s carnivalesque popular culture was utilized by these writers to resist the increasingly dogmatic official culture, as the 1930s developed the carnivalesque became an anti-hegemonic resource to facilitate.

Bibliographic Information. Carnival Culture and the Soviet Modernist Novel.

This book examines the work of five Soviet prose writers - Olesha, Platonov, Kharms, Bulgakov and Vaginov - in the light of the carnivalesque elements of Russian popular culture. Bibliographic Information.

New York: St. Mar- tin's Press, 1996. Brandist's hypothesis is that the carnival culture that first emerged as the balagan in symbolist theater (. Aleksandr Blok's Balaganchik) and the carnival street pro- ductions of Nikolai Evreinov during war communism, was driven into prose (based on the symbolist example of Andrei Belyi's Peterburg) in the work of such writers as Iurii Olesha, Andrei Platonov, Daniil Kharms, and. Mikhail Bulgakov (with a final note on K. Vaginov).

April 15, 2010 History. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Carnival culture and the Soviet modernist novel from your list? Carnival culture and the Soviet modernist novel. Published 1996 by St. Martin's Press in New York.

Автор: Craig Brandist Название: Carnival Culture and the Soviet Modernist Novel Издательство: Springer .

1996 Серия: St Antony's Series Язык: ENG Размер: 2. 9 x 1. 7 x . 0 cm Основная тема: Literature Рейтинг

Soviet popular culture and the changing institutional framework of Soviet society in the 1920s and 1930s.

Pub Date: 2014-01-14 ISBN-10 : 1349251224 ISBN-13 : 9781349251223 Author : Craig Brandist Publisher : Palgrave Macmillan This book examines the work of five Soviet prose writers - Olesha, Platonov, Kharms, Bulgakov and Vaginov - in the light of the carnivalesque elements of Russian popular culture

This text examines the work of five Soviet prose writers - Olesha, Platonov, Kharms, Bulgakov and Vaginov - in the light of the carnivalesque elements of Russian popular culture. It shows that while Bakhtin's account of carnival culture sheds considerable light on the work of these writers, they need to be considered with reference to both the concrete forms of Russian and Soviet popular culture and the changing institutional framework of Soviet society in the 1920s and 1930s.