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eBook Women, Writing, and the Industrial Revolution ePub

eBook Women, Writing, and the Industrial Revolution ePub

by Susan Zlotnick

  • ISBN: 0801866499
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Susan Zlotnick
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (February 21, 2001)
  • Pages: 336
  • ePub book: 1375 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1440 kb
  • Other: lit rtf doc lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 826

Description

Women, Writing, and the . .has been added to your Cart.

Women, Writing, and the . This is a far-reaching and original book that should be required reading for all students and scholars of 19th-century literature.

Susan Zlotnick some slowing in improvement among women under 60 is also perceptible

some slowing in improvement among women under 60 is also perceptible.

Book Description Eighteen women, including Jamaica Kincaid, Rigoberta .

Book Description Eighteen women, including Jamaica Kincaid, Rigoberta Menchu, Cherrie Moraga, Marjorie Agosin, Margaret Randall, Gloria Anzaldua, Michelle Cliff, Edwidge Danticat, and Julia Alvarez, are featured in this powerful anthology on art, feminism, and activism in Latin America and the Caribbean. Women Writing Resistance highlights Latin American and Caribbean women writers who, with increasing urgency, are writing in the service of social justice and against the entrenched patriarchal, racist, and exploitative regimes that have ruled their countries.

Susan Zlotnick teaches courses that focus on nineteenth-century British literature, with a special emphasis .

Susan Zlotnick teaches courses that focus on nineteenth-century British literature, with a special emphasis on the English novel and women writers such as the Jane Austen and the Brontës. She also participates in Vassar’s multidisciplinary programs, including Women’s Studies and Victorian Studies.

They made most of what they needed by hand. For example, female family members usually made clothing. Several workers were needed to spin enough thread to supply a single weaver. In 1769 Englishman Richard Arkwright invented a large spinning machine called a water frame.

The industrial revolution in nineteenth-century England disrupted traditional ways of life. Condemning these transformations, the male writers who explored the brave new world of Victorian industrialism looked longingly to an idealized past. However, British women writers were not so pessimistic and some even foresaw the prospect of real improvement. As Susan Zlotnick argues in Women, Writing, and the Industrial Revolution, novelists Elizabeth Gaskell, Charlotte Brontë, Frances Trollope, and Charlotte Elizabeth Tonna were more willing to embrace industrialism than their male counterparts. While these women's responses to early industrialism differed widely, they imagined the industrial revolution and the modernity it heralded in ways unique to their gender. Zlotnick extends her analysis of the literature of the industrial revolution to the poetry and prose produced by working-class men and women. She examines the works of Chartist poets, dialect writers, and two "factory girl" poets who wrote about their experiences in the mills.