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eBook Matthew Arnold (The Oxford Authors) ePub

eBook Matthew Arnold (The Oxford Authors) ePub

by Matthew Arnold,Miriam Allott,Robert H. Super

  • ISBN: 0192541870
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Matthew Arnold,Miriam Allott,Robert H. Super
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (January 1, 1987)
  • Pages: 600
  • ePub book: 1583 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1996 kb
  • Other: rtf doc lrf azw
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 148

Description

The two sides of Matthew Arnold's literary achievement-the celebrated verse and prose -are brought together .

The two sides of Matthew Arnold's literary achievement-the celebrated verse and prose -are brought together in this single volume. Arnold's major poems, "Stanzas from the Grande Chartreuse," the love poems in the "Switzerland" and "Faded Leaves" sequences, several narrative poems, and his major elegies are found in part one of this volume.

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Arnold was educated at Rugby; graduated from Balliol College, Oxford in 1844; and was a fellow of Oriel College, Oxford in 1845

Arnold was educated at Rugby; graduated from Balliol College, Oxford in 1844; and was a fellow of Oriel College, Oxford in 1845. In 1851, after a period as secretary to the 3d marquess of Lansdowne, Arnold was appointed inspector of schools, a position he held until 1886, two years before his death. During his tenure he went on a number of missions to European schools.

Arnold also studied at Balliol College, Oxford University Arnold became the first professor to lecture in English rather than Latin.

Arnold also studied at Balliol College, Oxford University. In 1844, after completing his undergraduate degree at Oxford, he returned to Rugby as a teacher of classics. Arnold became the first professor to lecture in English rather than Latin. During this time Arnold wrote the bulk of his most famous critical works, Essays in Criticism (1865) and Culture and Anarchy (1869), in which he sets forth ideas that greatly reflect the predominant values of the Victorian era.

Author:Matthew Arnold. Matthew Arnold: A later estimate, from the point of view of one who knew him well (Lippincott's Monthly, December 1909:670-74). Arnold, Matthew (2)," in Alumni Oxonienses: the Members of the University of Oxford, 1715-1886, by Joseph Foster, London: Parker and Co. (1888–1892) in 4 vols. Matthew Arnold (The Century Magazine, April 1894:931-37). Arnold, Matthew," in A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature, by John William Cousin, London: J. M. Dent & Sons (1910).

Matthew Arnold, English Victorian poet and literary and social critic, noted especially for his classical attacks on the . Matthew was the eldest son of the renowned Thomas Arnold, who was appointed headmaster of Rugby School in 1828.

Matthew Arnold, English Victorian poet and literary and social critic, noted especially for his classical attacks on the contemporary tastes and manners of the Barbarians (the aristocracy), the Philistines (the commercial middle class), and the Populace. Matthew entered Rugby (1837) and then attended Oxford as a scholar of Balliol College; there he won the Newdigate Prize with his poem Cromwell (1843) and was graduated with second-class honours in 1844. For Oxford Arnold retained an impassioned affection.

Matthew Arnold (December 24 1822 – April 15 1888) was an English poet, essayist and cultural critic. He also pursued a career as an inspector of schools. I keep saying, Shakspeare, Shakspeare, you are as obscure as life is. Letter to Arthur Hugh Clough (ca. 6 December 1847). Note: Alternate spelling used.

The two sides of Matthew Arnold's literary achievement-the celebrated verse and prose -are brought together in this . Matthew Arnold Oxford Authors Oxford paperbacks. Matthew Arnold, Miriam Farris Allott, Robert Henry Super. Miriam Farris Allott, Robert Henry Super. Oxford University Press, 1987. 0192541870, 9780192541871.

The Oxford Authors : Matthew Arnold.

The two sides of Matthew Arnold's literary achievement--the celebrated verse and prose --are brought together in this single volume. Arnold's major poems, "Stanzas from the Grande Chartreuse," the love poems in the "Switzerland" and "Faded Leaves" sequences, several narrative poems, and his major elegies are found in part one of this volume. The prose selections in part two, arranged in chronological order of composition, span Arnold's entire writing career, beginning with several lively letters from his early correspondence with Arthur Hugh Clough, to his very last essay, "Civilization in the United States." Throughout both the poetry and prose is heard the unmistakable voice of a man whom E.M. Forster aptly described as "a great poet, a civilized citizen, and a prophet."

Comments

Painbrand Painbrand
Publication date: 1899

Nothing could convey George Saintsbury's style so well as some key quotations:

But once more, what we go to Mr Matthew Arnold for is not fact, it is not argument, it is not even learning. It is phrase, attitude, style, that by which, as he says admirably in this very book, “what a man has to say is recast and heightened in such a manner as to add dignity and distinction to it.” It is the new critical attitude, the appreciation of literary beauty in and for itself, the sense of “the word,” the power of discerning and the power of reflecting charm, the method not more different from the wooden deduction of the old school of critics than from the merely unenlightened and Philistine commonness of the reviewers, his earlier contemporaries, or from the aimless “I like that” and “I don’t like this” which does duty now, and did then, and has done always, for criticism itself.

(It is not so much a style, as a lack of style. The sentences are not so much ornate as careless and exuberant, with a tendency to run away with themselves):

He at least thought—and there was some justification of a good many kinds for him in thinking—that intellectual changes, of importance equal to the political, were coming or come upon the world. And so for a time he seems to have grown rather cold towards the Muses, his earliest and always his truest loves. Social, political, and religious matters tempted him away from literature; and for a matter of ten years it can hardly be said that he had anything to do with her except to take her name in vain in the title of by far his worst, as it was by far his most popular, volume.

(This is an allusion to LITERATURE AND DOGMA). Saintsbury apologizes for taking the time to argue with Arnold's brand of Christianity, but these are actually some of the most lively and valuable passages in the book:

Like almost all critics of his class recently, especially like Professor Huxley in another division, he appears not to comprehend what, to the believers in the supernatural, the supernatural means. He applies, as they all apply, the tests of the natural, and says, “Now really, you know, these tests are destructive.” He says—he cannot prove—that miracles do not happen now; his adversaries, if they were wise, would simply answer, “Après?” Do any of them pretend to prescribe to their God that His methods shall be always the same, or that those methods shall stand the tests of the laboratory and the School of Charters? that He shall give “a good title,” like a man who is selling a house? Some at least would rather not; they would feel appallingly little interest in a Divinity after this sworn-attorney and chartered-accountant fashion, who must produce vouchers for all His acts. And further (to speak with reverence), the Divinity whom they do worship would be likely to answer Mr Arnold in the words of a prophet of Mr Arnold’s own— “Du gleichst dem Geist den du begreifst, Nicht Mir!”

The whole book is a fine, concise overview of Matthew Arnold's life and work.
Kuve Kuve
Not the type of book I thought it was and did not really interest me,thought it was an action book