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eBook Steppenwolf ePub

eBook Steppenwolf ePub

by Thomas Wayne,Hermann Hesse

  • ISBN: 0875867839
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Thomas Wayne,Hermann Hesse
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Algora Publishing (March 15, 2010)
  • ePub book: 1129 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1620 kb
  • Other: azw doc txt rtf
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 276

Description

Steppenwolf (originally Der Steppenwolf) is the tenth novel by German-Swiss author Hermann Hesse. Originally published in Germany in 1927, it was first translated into English in 1929.

Steppenwolf (originally Der Steppenwolf) is the tenth novel by German-Swiss author Hermann Hesse. The novel was named after the German name for the steppe wolf. The story in large part reflects a profound crisis in Hesse's spiritual world during the 1920s while memorably portraying the protagonist's split between his humanity and his wolf-like aggression and homelessness.

Hermann Hesse's work Steppenwolf was first published in German in 1927, but what it contains . It is our good fortune to have this new translation of the work from Dr. Thomas Wayne

Hermann Hesse's work Steppenwolf was first published in German in 1927, but what it contains is still relevant today. Perhaps it is more important in our current cultural climate than ever before. It is the story of the lone individual, lost in the ironic good fortune and security of bourgeois banality and cultural conformity. Thomas Wayne. As he shows in his work here, there must be a proper balance of faithfulness to both the style and substance of the original. Basil Creighton's 1929 translation and the 1963 revision based upon it simply omit certain elements.

Translated from the German and with an Afterword by David Horrocks. Hermann Hesse was born in southern Germany in 1877. Hesse concentrated on writing poetry as a young man, but his first successful book was a novel, Peter Camenzind (1904). During the war, Hesse was actively involved in relief efforts. Depression, criticism for his pacifist views, and a series of personal crises led Hesse to undergo psychoanalysis with J. B. Lang.

Hermann Hesse Gave up a quarter the way through as have a million books l want to read.

Gave up a quarter the way through as have a million books l want to read.

Books related to Steppenwolf. Siddhartha: The Prince Who Became Buddha. To Kill a Mockingbird.

The New York Times Hermann Hesse's work Steppenwolf was first published in German in 1927, but what it contains is still relevant today.

Электронная книга "Steppenwolf", Hermann Hesse

Электронная книга "Steppenwolf", Hermann Hesse. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Steppenwolf" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Thomas Wayne presents a contemporary take on Hesse's classic story, so apt today, of the lone individual lost in the ironic good fortune and security of bourgeois banality and cultural conformity. Harry Haller has all the insight, all the leisure, all the material goods he needs, yet he is not at peace with his life.

By Hermann Hesse, Thomas Wayne. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles

By Hermann Hesse, Thomas Wayne. By Hermann Hesse, Thomas Wayne. Hermann Hesse’s work Steppenwolf was first published in German in 1927, but what it contains is still relevant today. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles.

Hermann Hesse, Steppenwolf. There is this bourgeoisie period in every man's life. A midpoint between birth and death where man is trapped alone. In league with Pessoa’s Book of Disquiet and Dostoevsky’s Raskolnikov, Hermann Hesse’s Steppenwolf is about a suicidal guy who never actually commits suicide, a tortured soul who struggles with the dualism of his nature, from the human to the wolf, from the classical to the romantic, to the spiritual to the sinful, from the life of the mind to the.

Thomas Wayne presents a fresh new translation of this classic that is a particular favorite of young adults confronting life's deepest questions and equally liberating for readers facing a mid-life crisis. Basil Creighton's 1929 version (revised in 1963 by Joseph Mileck) is the best-known version in English; it skips words, smoothes out long, involved passages, unnecessarily "improves" the text - all things Thomas Wayne refuses to do. As with his already published translations of Nietzsche's Thus Spake Zarathustra, Ecce Homo, and The Antichrist, he emphasizes a strict adherence and reverence for the literal - a Hesse for the 21st century, meaningful and faithful to the original.

Comments

shustrik shustrik
The author Hermann Hesse takes the reader on a journey through one man's life (Harry Haller) of middle aged melancholy. The author introduces several interesting characters all whom show Harry Haller that he has lost his zeal for life by forgetting to enjoy the enavaible journey.

The author at times looses the reader with an archaic vocabulary in describing the numerous settings Harry Haller's life travels through out the story.

Overall, the story of Steppenwolf is a story of hope that it is never too late bring about change and fulfillment in one's life.
Siramath Siramath
There are people out there, reading this review now, who have gone thru life feeling as though no one has ever understood them. Some of those people will read this book, 'Steppenwolf', & it will hit them like a bolt(& some wont like it at all). Not only will a few of them feel as though they have finally been understood, but they might feel as though at last they can begin to understand themselves!
Yes, there is someone who understands. His name is Hesse. Unfortunately he has passed on, he was from an earlier generation. But you know, when he lived people from all over the world wrote him letters asking for his understanding. He answered them all, & he usually had good advise for them. & he was able to understand not only because he was intellgent, but also because he had also suffered the problems of his 'Steppenwolf' himself. Yes, it might seem that he were writing this best of all books about each of us individually, but it was, in fact, autobiography. Half autobiography, half poem, & 100% masterpiece. Please read it, & dont allow the 1st 80 pages throw you off- it is going to come alive for you, as it has for people since 1927. You might be in for a treat.
However, some dont feel this way, especially these days. It is a little odd, I feel, that Hesse (who was so popular with readers from my generation in the early 1970s) has had a decline in popularity from 1980 on. He doesnt seem to strike the same chord in todays young readers as he did 30 years ago. Maybe because his books spoke about the importance of spirt over that of technology, I dont know. I dont think Hesse would have seen the rise of the PC & the internet as a bad thing at all, & think it would have been right up his alley, & that he might have made the internet a better thing than it is. In fact, the theme of 'The Glass Bead Game' brings to mind todays internet, & there is a website devoted to just that. But, for me anyway, the fact that todays generation has sort of rejected Hesse is one of the more sad things about it, because I would have believed that they would have embraced him even more than mine did. I think the reason that they havnt might be because that while they are very much in favor of the enlightment that Siddhartha, Goldman, Harry Haller, Sinclair, etc ultimately reach, they have never experienced the PROBLEMS of the Steppenwolf that set those characters on that road in the 1st place. I think that those kinds of problems might have been unique to my generation, & that Hesse came along for Americans just at the right time. It seems that the times have changed
Qwert Qwert
Here I am, like the Steppenwolf, approaching the age of 50. I understand him now for I have lived his life. His deepest thoughts are mine- indeed, they read exactly like my own journals. No wonder I am told that Hesse is my soul mate. It is true.

I lived Steppenwolf's solitary life. I knew his crisis. I share his rejection of bourgeois society because it grates the fundamental essence of my soul. And I know what he means by the strength derived from knowing that you can leave this world any time. I know the conviction to never sell yourself into wage slavery for mere money. I know his night wanderings, his books, his music, his rooms, his cigars, and his wine. I know.

But I also know his central crisis. For when we are ready then a door really does open to a higher perspective. I literally walked through that door in the wall for "madmen only." Like the wulf I had always sensed the golden moments that form the golden path to that door. I was eventually shown it. I had always suspected that man was more than a half rational animal, that he was a child of the Gods and destined to immortality. When you are ready, when you are sick enough of the petty ego, you will be shown the kingdom on the other side of time and appearances. It is just necessary to stumble through your share of dirt and humbug before you reach Home.

Time and the world, money and power belong to the small and shallow people. To the rest, the real men, belongs nothing. Nothing but death- and eternity- and the kingdom.