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eBook The Place of the Cross in Anglo-Saxon England (Pubns Manchester Centre for Anglo-Saxon Studies) ePub

eBook The Place of the Cross in Anglo-Saxon England (Pubns Manchester Centre for Anglo-Saxon Studies) ePub

by Catherine E. Karkov,Sarah Larratt Keefer,Karen Louise Jolly

  • ISBN: 1843831945
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Catherine E. Karkov,Sarah Larratt Keefer,Karen Louise Jolly
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Boydell Press (March 1, 2006)
  • Pages: 192
  • ePub book: 1642 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1760 kb
  • Other: lit lrf rtf mobi
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 118

Description

the high standard the essays in this collection set for future studies in the field

JOURNAL OF ENGLISH AND GERMAN PHILOLOGY There is no doubting the richness and range of the learning revealed in these papers or the case they make that the cross was of great importance in Anglo-Saxon England. A very worthwhile and interesting book.

Catherine E. Karkov, Sarah Larratt Keefer, Karen Louise Jolly. The cross in early medieval England was so ubiquitous as to become invisible to the modern eye: it played an innovative role in Anglo-Saxon culture, evident in art, architecture, material culture, literature, ritual, medicine, and popular practice. The essays in this volume move us from the place of the cross in the origins of Anglo-Saxon England and the Anglo-Saxon church, to its place in the expansion of the early Anglo-Saxon kingdoms both within and beyond England. KARKOV is Professor of Art at Miami University. The Place of the Cross in Anglo-Saxon England (Pubns Manchester Centre for Anglo-Saxon Studies).

The essays in this volume move us from the place of the cross in the origins of Anglo-Saxon England and the Anglo-Saxon church The cross in early medieval England was so ubiquitous as to become invisible to the modern eye: it played an innovative role in Anglo-Saxon culture, evident in art, architecture, material culture, literature, ritual, medicine, and popular practice. CATHERINE E. SARAH L. KEEFER is Professor of English at Trent University. 1843831945 (ISBN13: 9781843831945).

Pubns Manchester Centre for Anglo-Saxon Studies. Both episcopal and abbatial authority were of fundamental importance to the development of the Christian church in Anglo-Saxon England. Pubns Manchester Centre for Anglo-Saxon Studies. Download list of titles. Bishops and heads of monastic houses were invested with a variety of types of power and influence. Their actions, decisions, and writings could change not only their own institutions, but also the national church, while their interaction with the king and his court affected wider contemporary society.

Hardback 9781843831945.

The cross in early medieval England was so ubiquitous as to become invisible to the modern eye: it played an innovative role in Anglo-Saxon culture, evident in art, architecture, material culture, literature, ritual, medicine, and popular practice.

Catherine Karkov is professor of History of Art and head of the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies at the University of Leeds

Catherine Karkov is professor of History of Art and head of the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies at the University of Leeds.

Each of the 12 articles are argued well and are consistently and thoroughly footnoted, making it possible to follow up some of the interesting points made. However, it is expensive - largely because it is an academic book not intended for the mass market - and as a result it may be worth purchasing only if you have a deep-seated interest in the Norman Conquest. Certainly a good knowledge of the period is assumed; some awareness of the main primary sources is also helpful.

Between the reign of Alfred in the late ninth century and the arrival of the Normans in 1066, a unique set of images of kingship and queenship was developed in Anglo-Saxon England, images of leadership that centred on books, authorship and learning rather than thrones, sword and sceptres. Focusing on the cultural and historical contexts in which these images were produced, this book explores the reasons for their development, and their meaning and function within both England and early medieval Europe.

Sarah Larratt Keefer, Karen Jolly and Catherine Karkov. Gale Owen-Crocker (Woodbridge: Boydell, 2005), pp. 93-108; "The Veneration of the Cross in Anglo-Saxon England", in The Liturgy of the Late Anglo-Saxon Church, ed. H. Gittos and M. Bradford Bedingfield, Henry Bradshaw Society Subsidia Series V (Woodbridge: Boydell, 2005), 141-82; "Old English Religious Texts," inReadings in Medieval Texts, ed.

The cross in early medieval England was so ubiquitous as to become invisible to the modern eye: it played an innovative role in Anglo-Saxon culture, evident in art, architecture, material culture, literature, ritual, medicine, and popular practice. The essays in this volume move us from the place of the cross in the origins of Anglo-Saxon England and the Anglo-Saxon church, to its place in the expansion of the early Anglo-Saxon kingdoms both within and beyond England. They reach back to the sources, both material and textual, of Early Christian Rome and Jerusalem, and forward to the visionary cross of the Last Judgement. Perhaps most importantly, throughout they challenge existing notions of the development of Anglo-Saxon sculpture, the patronage and audiences of Anglo-Saxon texts, the use of sources, physical and cultural geography and the Anglo-Saxon imagination. In doing so they make important contributions not only to our understanding of Anglo-Saxon England and the place of the cross within it, but also to our understanding of the place of Anglo-Saxon England within the medieval world. CATHERINE E. KARKOV is Professor of Art at Miami University. SARAH L. KEEFER is Professor of English at Trent University. KAREN L. JOLLY is Associate Professor of History at the University of Hawaii Manoa. Contributors: IAN WOOD, ELIZABETH COATSWORTH, ALEXANDER R. RUMBLE, INGE B. MILFULL, KAREN LOUISE JOLLY, DAVID F. JOHNSON, KAROLYN KINANE, JANE ROBERTS, CALVIN B. KENDALL, ELAINE TREHARNE, NICHOLAS J. HIGHAM.