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eBook The Life and Times of Chaucer ePub

eBook The Life and Times of Chaucer ePub

by John Gardner

  • ISBN: 0224013874
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: John Gardner
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Jonathan Cape Ltd; 1st edition (November 17, 1977)
  • Pages: 352
  • ePub book: 1828 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1744 kb
  • Other: mbr mobi mbr doc
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 496

Description

As such the book is more times than life, as we know relatively little about Chaucer the man, other than what is revealed by his poetry.

As such the book is more times than life, as we know relatively little about Chaucer the man, other than what is revealed by his poetry. has a keen eye for incidental details that illustrate the timeless nature of human folly, which is fundamental focus Chaucer's humane and insightful poetic stories. My favourite is the claim the Edward II's youngest son, John of Gaunt (born to Isabella in Ghent, Belgium) was in fact a changling, swapped at birth for a Flemish imposter.

The author brings to this biography the voice of Chaucer. His story telling gift re-creates for us the climate and feel of Chaucer's day".

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. The author brings to this biography the voice of Chaucer. Discover Prime Book Box for Kids.

The pinnacle of Gardner’s medieval scholarship: a fascinating re-creation of the world of one of history’s greatest writers In this exquisite biography, John Gardner brings to life Geoffrey Chaucer, illuminating his writings and their inspiration like never before

The pinnacle of Gardner’s medieval scholarship: a fascinating re-creation of the world of one of history’s greatest writers In this exquisite biography, John Gardner brings to life Geoffrey Chaucer, illuminating his writings and their inspiration like never before.

Private Investigator. San Francisco Daily Digest.

The pinnacle of Gardner's medieval scholarship: a fascinating re-creation of the world of one of history's greatest writers In this exquisite biography, John Gardner brings to life Geoffrey Chaucer, illuminating his writings and their inspiration like never before

The pinnacle of Gardner's medieval scholarship: a fascinating re-creation of the world of one of history's greatest writers In this exquisite biography, John Gardner brings to life Geoffrey Chaucer, illuminating his writings and their inspiration like never before. Written with passion.

Chaucer, Geoffrey, d. 1400, Chaucer, Geoffrey, ca 1340-1400, Poets, English.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Chaucer, Geoffrey, d. New York : Knopf : distributed by Random House.

Электронная книга "The Life & Times of Chaucer", John Gardner. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Life & Times of Chaucer" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

An Entertaining & Informative Work on Chaucer and his Times. com User, August 25, 2008. I came into this book after reading "Katherine" by Anya Seton. I had read a Gardner novel many years ago, and was impressed by the superlative writing style he employs. The work almost reads as easily as a good novel, and doesn't wholeheartedly fall into the category of literary criticism.

In this exquisite biography, John Gardner brings to life Geoffrey Chaucer, illuminating his writings and their inspiration like never before. Written with passion and insight, this a must-read for those interested in Chaucer and the medieval time period.

Home Gardner, John The Life and Times of Chaucer. We stock over 75,000 used, rare, and out of print books and thousands of antiquarian prints and maps as well as more than 20,000 used classical and jazz records. The address of our web page is ww. auriebooks. The Life and Times of Chaucer. ISBN 10: 0394493176, ISBN 13: 9780394493176. Visit Seller's Storefront.

viii 328p x cloth, dustjacket, notes, index, ornaments, very good copy from a Cambridge college library, from a Cambridge college library

Comments

Hamrl Hamrl
I went looking for more Gardner and found this, which is absolutely delightful. Gardner's chatty, relaxed style does not conceal his obvious scholarship but does highlight his own delight in Chaucer, who lacks readership because of language and translation difficulties rather than because he has nothing to say and doesn't mind taking three volumes to say it - there is no gray in Chaucer, although there is a good deal of rollicking sex. Hopefully this book will inspire readers to do a little digging into gentil Geoffrey. An edition with a Middle English glossary will get most intelligent readers over the hump, and as Gardner makes clear, it's well worth the effort. Even if you never read any Chaucer, this biography will introduce you to a charming, hardworking, rather lovable - scamp.Gardner's inclusion of historical and social background illuminates the man as well as the poetry.
Goldendragon Goldendragon
In this bio, the times are far more interesting than the life. TO make his living as a poet, Chaucer was courtier and upper-level functionary. Much of his life he kept accounts of customs houses, oversaw building projects, and acted as a lawyer and judge, all the while ingratiating himself to aristocratic patrons and the kings. He gave readings of his poems, which were bawdy and splendid with ironies and piquant observations, establishing himself as the greatest poet in Europe of his age and creating a great legacy. However, not only is very very little known of his intimate life, but the details that have been unearthed by scholars in obscure archives are simply banal.

The times are very interesting. First, his life covered the close of the 100 years war, a time of military necessity that anticipated the rise of the absolutist state, with its creation of an administrative apparatus the likes of which the world had never seen. Chaucer was a cog in this evolving machine, which accepted administrators of talent from bourgeois households while subordinating aristocrats to the crown. Second, there were a series of interesting kings, from the legacy of the eccentrically incompetent Edward II to his beloved son (Ed III) until the megalomaniacal Richard II. These developments are covered with beautiful, succinct descriptions that are a pleasure to read. Chaucer knew most of the famous and infamous, including the black prince, John of Gaunt, the notorious courtesan Alice Perrers, and many others. He was also a diplomat, negotiating marriage and trade agreements as well as a representative of the crown that required travel all over England. Nonetheless, there were many functionaries like Chaucer and nothing that he did contributed anything original to this incredible political period, however much he was at the scene and hence a good vehicle to evoke it all.

Unfortunately, the book also attempts to address the innumerable scholarly questions about when and where Chaucer wrote various works. These long stretches are so dull to the lay reader that they can be skipped easily, to find the nuggets of The Times that are far more fun. Gardner also speculates way too much on the unknowable details of Chaucer's intimate life, such as whether he loved his wife, whether he married her at the behest of his patron to conceal the fact that an aristocrat had impregnated her. Some of this is common sense, but much of it is interpreted in light of his poetry. This fills more than half of the book and was a complete bore to me. Only a specialized academic would find it of interest or even relevant to the narrative.

The book is not easy to read. There are many sections with long quotes, sometimes a page or more, of the archaic English of the time. This adds to the tedium, unless the reader is fluent in middle english. However, Gardner is a wonderful stylist: his prose is uniquely original and elegant.

REcommended for scholars, Gardner fans, and determined lay readers. It is not for the general reader.
nailer nailer
I read this book seeking more information on two aspects of Chaucer in particular:

(1) His choice to write in English, rather than the French of the aristocracy or the Latin of the Catholic/Christian priests. Middle English had only recently formed, and it is a significant development as it is the only language in Europe not to have artifical gendering in the grammar. It lost the artificial gendering of its German roots; the table is not "der table", nor is it "la table". This had huge significance as the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and the Tractatus of Glanville, for example, make clear that the English translation of the Great Charter (Magna Carta) considers the rights and responsibility to be based in "person, man or woman". The 1689 English Bill of Rights uses only ther term "Person". "Rights and responsibilities of person/citizen" are the basis of the 1787-1781 US Constitution, whereas the 1789 French Constitution in based in "rights of man". Also, by contrast, the Latin/Catholic/Holy Roman Empire constitutions, such as those in Latin America today, are based in "rights of man" and "responsibilities of woman".

(2) The context of his "Legend of Good Women", which was quite a skilled rebuttal of the Catholic/Christian ideology being proselytized.

I came away with a conclusion that the author wasn't able to separate his own subjective agenda from the "life and times of Chaucer." His use of the royal "we" throughout, a pedantic, pompous scholarly intrusion that doesn't show up much in academic writing any more was distracting to me at first, and then I began to think that this author has an agenda.

The author admits he's not a historian, he's a poet himself. He makes clear his views in the introduction.

He does provide some interesting context, but I'm afraid he misses the mark as a definitive source of information.
Gogul Gogul
I came into this book after reading "Katherine" by Anya Seton. I had read a Gardner novel many years ago, and was impressed by the superlative writing style he employs. The work almost reads as easily as a good novel, and doesn't wholeheartedly fall into the category of literary criticism. Chaucer is portrayed sympathetically, as a civil servant you would like to know. Excerpts from his poems are presented in the original middle English, with a pronunciation guide in the back of the book. It is a challenge to read the original texts, but well worth it.

If you are interested in Chaucer's life, his work, or 14th Century England written in a vibrantly readable style, you will enjoy this book. The knowledge imparted resembles a textbook, but the writing style resembles a well written novel.
Manesenci Manesenci
I enjoy a biography of an author that doesn't take all observations about the writer from their work but their life and times, that is what this one does rather than decipher a personality from prose. You won't regret this one.....
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