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eBook How Our Lives Become Stories: Making Selves ePub

eBook How Our Lives Become Stories: Making Selves ePub

by Paul John Eakin

  • ISBN: 0801436591
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Paul John Eakin
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (September 2, 1999)
  • Pages: 224
  • ePub book: 1247 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1821 kb
  • Other: mbr lit txt docx
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 871

Description

Start by marking How Our Lives Become Stories: Making Selves as Want to Read .

Start by marking How Our Lives Become Stories: Making Selves as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Informed by literary, scientific, and experiential concerns, How Our Lives Become Stories enhances our knowledge of the complex forces that shape identity, and confronts the equally complex problems that arise when we write about who we think we are.

Paul John Eakin has always been a few steps ahead of the rest of u. Eakin shows the infinitely complex ways in which we become and remember who we are in our bodies and our brains. "-Susanna Egan, University of British Columbia, "This fascinating new book. introduction to identity and narrative.

And while some critics have derided the explosion of memoir as exhibitionistic and self-aggrandizing, literary theorists are now beginning to look seriously at this profusion of autobiographical literature.

In How Our Lives Become Stories, Paul John Eakin explains why he prefers 'to think of self less as an entity and more as a kind of awareness in process. How Our Lives Become Stories is a concise and engaging synopsis of the state of the art for anyone interested in the subject. Modern Fiction Studies show more. About Paul John Eakin.

In this intriguing book, Paul John Eakin problematizes the notion of autobiography as 'the story of the self' .

In this intriguing book, Paul John Eakin problematizes the notion of autobiography as 'the story of the self' and argues that in the act of narration one is engaged in a process of making a self. Eakin attends to those who are repelled by the 'urge to confess' and he talks about telling all as a cultural imperative that may, for example, be costly to the families of memoirists despite the therapeutic value such confessions might have.

oceedings{Eakin1999HowOL, title {How Our Lives Become Stories: Making Selves}, author {Paul John . Aspects of the self : an analysis of self reflection, self presentation and the experiential self within selected Buddhist blogs.

oceedings{Eakin1999HowOL, title {How Our Lives Become Stories: Making Selves}, author {Paul John Eakin}, year {1999} }. Paul John Eakin.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for How Our Lives Become Stories: Making Selves . Eakin concludes by engaging the ethical issues raised by the conflict between the authorial impulse to life writing and a traditional, privacy-based ethics that such writings often violate.

Eakin concludes by engaging the ethical issues raised by the conflict between the authorial impulse to life writing and a traditional, privacy-based ethics that such writings often violate. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

How Our Lives Become Stories: Making Selves. He implies that the writer might very well produce his life according to the desired self-portraiture. De Man states that the self in this case is a linguistic structure, an imagined narrative construction

Includes bibliographical references (p. 187-202) and index.

Includes bibliographical references (p. Donor challenge: This is the last day your donation will be matched 2-to-1. Triple your impact! To the Internet Archive Community, Time is running out: please help the Internet Archive today.

Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. The Visible Human Project: Informatic Bodies and Posthuman Medicine. Journal of Medical Humanities 22, 315–318 (2001) doi:10. 1023/A:1016619211701.

The popularity of such books as Frank McCourt's Angela's Ashes, Mary Karr's The Liars' Club, and Kathryn Harrison's controversial The Kiss, has led columnists to call ours "the age of memoir." And while some critics have derided the explosion of memoir as exhibitionistic and self-aggrandizing, literary theorists are now beginning to look seriously at this profusion of autobiographical literature.

Informed by literary, scientific, and experiential concerns, How Our Lives Become Stories enhances our knowledge of the complex forces that shape identity, and confronts the equally complex problems that arise when we write about who we think we are. Using life writings as examples―including works by Christa Wolf, Art Spiegelman, Oliver Sacks, Henry Louis Gates, Melanie Thernstrom, and Philip Roth―Paul John Eakin draws on the latest research in neurology, cognitive science, memory studies, developmental psychology, and related fields to rethink the very nature of self-representation.

After showing how the experience of living in one's body shapes one's identity, he explores relational and narrative modes of being, emphasizing social sources of identity, and demonstrating that the self and the story of the self are constantly evolving in relation to others. Eakin concludes by engaging the ethical issues raised by the conflict between the authorial impulse to life writing and a traditional, privacy-based ethics that such writings often violate.