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eBook A Poetics ePub

eBook A Poetics ePub

by Charles Bernstein

  • ISBN: 0674678540
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Charles Bernstein
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press (February 11, 1992)
  • Pages: 240
  • ePub book: 1172 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1775 kb
  • Other: lrf lit txt lrf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 879

Description

Bernstein holds the Donald T. Regan Chair in the Department of English at the University of Pennsylvania.

Bernstein holds the Donald T. In 2006 he was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2005, Bernstein was awarded the Dean's Award for Innovation in Teaching at the University of Pennsylvania.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. This rich collection is far more than an important work of criticism by an extraordinary poet; it is a poetic intervention into criticism. Artifice of Absorption.

Photo by Gezett/ullstein bild via Getty Images Since the 1970s Bernstein has published dozens of books, including poetry and essay collections, pamphlets, translations, collaborations, an. .

Photo by Gezett/ullstein bild via Getty Images. Poet, essayist, theorist, and scholar Charles Bernstein was born in New York City in 1950. Bernstein was educated at the Bronx High School of Science and at Harvard University, where he studied philosophy with Stanley Cavell and wrote his final thesis on Gertrude Stein and Ludwig Wittgenstein. Since the 1970s Bernstein has published dozens of books, including poetry and essay collections, pamphlets, translations, collaborations, and libretti. His poetry has been widely anthologized and translated, and it has appeared in over 500 magazines and periodicals.

Poetics is the continuation of poetry by other means," he writes. Insisting on the vital need for radical innovation, Bernstein traces the traditions of modern poetry back to Stein and Wilde, taking issue with those critics who see in the "postmodern" a loss of political and aesthetic relevance

Город: Brooklyn, New YorkРабота: Institute for Avant-Garde Comedy & Stand.

Charles Bernstein - Charles Bernstein was born in New York City in 1950. He is also the author of three books of essays, My Way: Speeches and Poems (1999), A Poetics (1992), and Content's Dream: Essays 1975-1984 (1986)

Charles Bernstein - Charles Bernstein was born in New York City in 1950. He is also the author of three books of essays, My Way: Speeches and Poems (1999), A Poetics (1992), and Content's Dream: Essays 1975-1984 (1986). Among his translations from the French are Red, Green, and Black (1990, by Olivier Cadiot) and The Maternal Drape (1984, by Claude Royed-Journoud). Regan Chair in the Department of English at the University of Pennsylvania

Bernstein holds the Donald T. He has also been a visiting professor at Columbia University, Brown University, and Princeton University. Bernstein's highly anticipated new work, All the Whisky in Heaven, will be published in Spring 2010 by Farrar, Straus, and Giroux.

A lecture by Charles Bernstein on poetics. Bernstein reads from "Fragments from the 17th Manifesto of Nude Formalism by Hermes Hermeneutic" and "The Second Wa. Discussion includes the holocaust, Heidegger, racism, radical modernism, the effects of World War II on American culture, and Reznikoff's "Holocaust. The lecture ends with a question and answer session.

Poetics is the continuation of poetry by other means, he writes. Insisting on the vital need for radical innovation, Bernstein traces the traditions of modern poetry back to Stein and Wilde, taking issue with those critics who see in the postmodern a loss of political and aesthetic relevance.

This rich collection is far more than an important work of criticism by an extraordinary poet; it is a poetic intervention into criticism. Artifice of Absorption

This rich collection is far more than an important work of criticism by an extraordinary poet; it is a poetic intervention into criticism. Artifice of Absorption," a key essay, is written in verse, and its structures and rhythms initiate the reader into the strength and complexity of the argument.

This rich collection is far more than an important work of criticism by an extraordinary poet; it is a poetic intervention into criticism. "Artifice of Absorption," a key essay, is written in verse, and its structures and rhythms initiate the reader into the strength and complexity of the argument. In a wild variety of topics, polemic, and styles, Bernstein surveys the current poetry scene and addresses many of the hot issues of poststructuralist literary theory. "Poetics is the continuation of poetry by other means," he writes. What role should poetics play in contemporary culture? Bernstein finds the answer in dissent, not merely in argument but in form--a poetic language that resists being easily absorbed into the conventions of our culture.

Insisting on the vital need for radical innovation, Bernstein traces the traditions of modern poetry back to Stein and Wilde, taking issue with those critics who see in the "postmodern" a loss of political and aesthetic relevance. Sometimes playful, often hortatory, always intense, he joins in the debate on cultural diversity and the definition of modernism. We encounter Swinburne and Morris as surprising precursors, along with considerations of Wittgenstein, Khlebnikov, Adorno, Jameson, and Pac-Man. A Poetics is both criticism and poetry, both tract and song, with no dull moments.

Comments

Zetadda Zetadda
Responding to what the previous poster wrote: The first chapter in the book, "Artifice as Absorption" is a captivating and provocative essay on what makes so-called "difficult" literature valuable. As if to prove his point about how "anti-absorptive" works (such as the writing of Beckett, Gertrude Stein, LANGUAGE poets like Bernstein) are sometimes more engaging than your typical potboiler, Bernstein has produced an unlikely page-turner here. Among the chapter's "artificial" effects: it's written in verse, and it has footnotes. And one warning: it probably will be difficult to decipher if you're not somewhat conversant with literary theory. But if you're interested in literature, especially poetry, Bernstein's is an invaluable take on some of the debates currently raging over what makes verse, especially difficult or avant-garde verse, worth worrying over. I particularly like his point that "common-voice" poetry (like Gary Snyder's or Robert Bly's), though the accepted model for "honest" poetry, is really doubly artificial, because it's hiding its artifice behind a masquerade of plainspokenness.

Full disclousre: I'm a grad student and a poet (though not as avant- as Bernstein) and I really loved this essay. I'm still working through the rest of the book, which I checked out from the library.
Saberblade Saberblade
READ THE FIRST ESSAY IN THIS BOOK REPEAT