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eBook The Great Women Superheroes ePub

eBook The Great Women Superheroes ePub

by Trina Robbins

  • ISBN: 0878164812
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Trina Robbins
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Kitchen Sink Pr; First Edition edition (November 1, 1996)
  • Pages: 207
  • ePub book: 1278 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1984 kb
  • Other: txt lit lrf lrf
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 143

Description

Who is Miss Fury? What is Supergirl's disguise? Here comic illustrater and writer Robbins (A Century of Women Cartoonists, Kitchen Sink, 1993) answers these questions and a great many more.

Who is Miss Fury? What is Supergirl's disguise? Here comic illustrater and writer Robbins (A Century of Women Cartoonists, Kitchen Sink, 1993) answers these questions and a great many more.

The Great Women Superheroes book. Trina Robbins, author of A Century of Women Cartoonists, has written the ultimate book on superheroines. The Great Women Superheroes is the first book of its kind. Robbins covers good girls and bad in one fascinating volume. Over 200 illustrations!

Presents a history of comic strip heroines from the 1940s to the present.

Select Format: Hardcover. Presents a history of comic strip heroines from the 1940s to the present. ISBN13: 9780878164820.

Robbins began her cartooning career in the underground in 1966, and has become not only a major artist but the foremost pop historian of women in comics. Robbins began her cartooning career in the underground in 1966, and has become not only a major artist but the foremost pop historian of women in comics.

The Great Women Superheroes. Kitchen Sink Press, 1996. The Great Women Superheroes is pretty much what it sounds like. Trina Robbins’ author’s note provides some useful clarification: This book is called The Great Women Superheroes, rather than An Encyclopedia of Women Superheroes, so that I could include only those whom I felt to be the best, the worst, the silliest, or the most interesting. I had to define superheroines as those comic book heroines who fit in at least one of the following categories: they wore costumes, had special powers, and/or had secret identities.

Robbins' official involvement with Wonder Woman, a character she had . Trina Robbins, The Great Women Superheroes (Kitchen Sink Press, 1996). ISBN 0-87816-481-2, p. 166.

Robbins' official involvement with Wonder Woman, a character she had long admired, began in 1986. At the conclusion of the first volume of the series (in conjunction with the series Crisis on Infinite Earths), DC Comics published a four-issue limited series titled The Legend of Wonder Woman, written by Kurt Busiek and drawn by Robbins. Robbins has been writing the comic book adventures of Honey West, notable as being one of popular fiction's first female private detectives. Writing and activism.

Aimee Vincent, Trina Robbins. Published: 1 June 2011. by Informa UK Limited. in Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics. Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics, Volume 2, pp 98-101; doi:10. Keywords: Trina Robbins, Great Women Superheroes.

Most would be hard-pressed to name one female superhero besides Wonder Woman. Robbins shows that there have been hundreds. When psychologist William Marston (inventor of the lie detector, by the way) created WW in 1941, her success opened the floodgates for such exotically named but generally undistinguished imitations as Liberty Girl and Madame Strange. The '70s saw a rash of "women's lib" ^-influenced characters sporting what Robbins terms a "slightly addled feminism.

Presents a history of comic strip heroines from the 1940s to the present

Comments

Winail Winail
Trina Robbins puts her years of both comic professionalism and comic fandom to effective use in her survey of The Great Women Super Heroes. She begins in the Golden Age and ends in the mid-90's and is quite thorough. The concentration of the book is on the heroines of the golden age which should be interesting for most readers as this will be the least familiar period to many of them (and readers of other comic book histories will be surprised that there were so many women heroes fighting the good fight). The section that is the most fun, though, is the discussion of the silver age and the recent period as the author allows herself a little more room for editorializing rather than simply surveying and Ms. Robbins opinions are always worth the wait. This area could even be expanded to into a book in its own right. The book is amply and appropriately illustrated. This is a great book for anyone interested in comic books and their checkered history of portraying women. But most of all it is a fun, breezy read.
Alister Alister
I enjoyed this book a great deal, and recommend it to anyone who is interested in comic book history. I never knew that there were so many female super-characters around in the 1940s. However, I can't recommend it to anyone doing a serious research project. There are so many errors in the sections about the comics I know, that I don't know how much credence to give the rest. For example, a caption states that Supergirl debuted in Adventure Comics instead of Action Comics; the text refers to the force field powers of Jean Grey instead of Sue Storm; and the artist on the Tomboy strip is said to be Jack Kirby instead of Mort Meskin.
Thetalune Thetalune
Celebrating the distaff side of the superheroic fraternity, Trina Robbins' examination of the place of women superheroes in comics history is a fascinating and compelling read. Yes, the expected entries are here - a lengthy analysis of Wonder Woman, for example - but countless lesser-known heroines are enumerated and critiqued, from the sidekicks and helpmeets such as Supergirl and Batgirl to stand-alone adventuresses such as the Phantom Lady and Liberty Belle.

However, the book is more than merely a dry recital of history. Robbin's energetic and vivacious style emphasises not just that these characters are remembered, but why they are special, as powerful role models for girls and women in a medium too often dominated by teenage hetboy fantasies.

Robbin's informed and enthusiastic text places each figure, from the 1940's to the present day, into a social context, while never losing sight of the sense-of-wonder appeal that is at the core of the comics medium.

Copious illustrations liven up the text, and if a dash of colour would have helped the monochrome pages - well, there's always the next edition!
Yananoc Yananoc
This is a solid history of superheroines from the 30s to the 90s with particular attention to those lost years between the end of WWII and the launch of Marvel comics in the early 60s.

Obscure characters and creators are highlighted and given their due.

A worthwhile read for anyone interested in comic history.