cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Jane Austen's Novels: The Art of Clarity
eBook Jane Austen's Novels: The Art of Clarity ePub

eBook Jane Austen's Novels: The Art of Clarity ePub

by Roger Gard

  • ISBN: 0300059264
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Roger Gard
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Yale University Press; 2d ptg. edition (September 10, 1994)
  • Pages: 272
  • ePub book: 1421 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1630 kb
  • Other: docx azw mobi rtf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 434

Description

Jane Austen's Novels book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Jane Austen's Novels: The Art of Clarity as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Jane Austen's Novels book.

This book by Roger Gard is at once a thoughtful and detailed discussion of Jane Austen's oeuvre and a provocative and witty . Given the subtitle: "The Art of Clarity," the cover, a detail of a painting by Turner, seemed ironic

Given the subtitle: "The Art of Clarity," the cover, a detail of a painting by Turner, seemed ironic. The painting is a somewhat crudely painted room inhabited by vaguely human-shaped blobs of paint. Whatever one may think of Turner, "clarity" is not an adjective I would use for the illustration. Apparently, one needs to stand back from Turner's painting.

Gard offers lively and perceptive discussions of the six major novels, together with the early Lady Susan and the unfinished Sanditon.

Jane Austen's Novels: The Art of Clarity (Paperback) . Gard offers lively and perceptive discussions of the six major novels, together with the early Lady Susan and the unfinished Sanditon.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Jane Austen's Novels: The Art of. .Minimal damage to the book cover eg. scuff marks, but no holes or tears. If this is a hard cover, the dust jacket may be missing. Binding has minimal wear.

Minimal damage to the book cover eg. The majority of pages are undamaged with some creasing or tearing, and pencil underlining of text, but this is minimal. No highlighting of text, no writing in the margins, and no missing pages.

Chicago Distribution Center. Jane Austen's Novels: The Art of Clarity. Roger Gard, Jane Austen.

Jane Austen’s Textual Lives: From Aeshchyllus to Bollywood, Kathryn Sutherland, 2005, partial Google book. Jane Austen Related Posts: Dregston. Jane Austen and 18th Century Courtesy Books, Penelope Joan Fritzer, 1997, partial Google book. Jane Austen and Co: remaking the past in contemporary culture, Suzanne Rodin Pucci, James Thompson, 2003, partial Google book. Jane Austen and the Women of Her Time, What was the place of women in the early 19th century? (Written in English, scroll down).

Miniaturist as Jane Austen is, she has depicted the life of a few families. Jane’s knowledge about these families is, in no way shallow. It is rich in variation and contrasts. Jane Austen is a great novelist due to the universal significance of her novels. This universal significance is achieved in two ways. Reading character in Jane Austen's Emma, Van Gorcum.

Although Jane Austen has long been England's best-loved novelist, much current criticism tends to ignore the appeal and accessibility of her novels and instead treats them as mere material—the preserve of academics, feminists, historical specialists, and would-be radical theorists. This book by Roger Gard is at once a thoughtful and detailed discussion of Jane Austen's oeuvre and a provocative and witty commentary that will stimulate all readers.

Comments

Whitesmasher Whitesmasher
Rating a book like this is somewhat difficult, because it depends in part upon audience. This is a book that defends ordinary readers of Jane Austen, but I would not say that it is a book for them. Given the subtitle: "The Art of Clarity," the cover, a detail of a painting by Turner, seemed ironic. The painting is a somewhat crudely painted room inhabited by vaguely human-shaped blobs of paint. Whatever one may think of Turner, "clarity" is not an adjective I would use for the illustration. (Oddly enough, the illustration looks better in the little reproduction on Amazon than it does in person. Apparently, one needs to stand back from Turner's painting.)

Gard's writing is not a model of clarity either: his sentences are often convoluted, extremely long, include untranslated French passages, and forced me to seek a dictionary a number of times. One also needs to have read more 18th & 19th century literature than I have, since Gard is forever attempting to make a point by comparing Austen to some other work that I haven't read and that isn't sufficiently explained. I have read Madame Bovary, but I don't remember anything about her greyhound, so the comparison to Pug in Mansfield Park eludes me. That said, perhaps this is the sort of thing that professionals in literary criticism expect; indeed, I've read a lot worse, so perhaps I should only say that I don't recommend it to most people.

Gard does have a very worthwhile overall point, though. He argues that, contrary to what literary historians may argue, it is not necessary to do extensive research into Austen's life and times to understand her works. They are clear as they stand. I personally have read a number of the types of books that he mentions, like Alison Sulloway's Jane Austen and the Province of Womanhood, which I liked and Gard doesn't. I would agree with him that such reading is not necessary to understand Austen's work, although it can be interesting. I have an interest in the period beyond my enjoyment of Jane Austen, so I found it fascinating, but I don't think that I suddenly understand the books much better. I thank Gard for his confidence in common readers.
Enalonasa Enalonasa
The Yale University Press specializes in cogent academic commentaries. Roger Gard's Jane Austen's Novels: the Art of Clarity is a worthy addition to that tradition. However, the book was somewhat disappointing in its method and writing style. See the reviews by Elizabeth A. Root and Tracey Marks, with whom I agree. Gard assumes a working familiarity with the novels; this is not a hornbook for novices. His style is also dense, more so than lay readers of Austen may find comfortable. The `art of clarity' in his subtitle is Austen's, not his.

Still, there is much to recommend. Gard, a former Reader at Oxford, not only knows his subject, but delights in it. This is a welcome change from the ideologic criticism of feminists and more radical theorists who fancy themselves Jane-ites, but miss much of the artistry, complexity of plot structure, and good humor that undergirds Austen's reputation. He also avoids the error of treating the novels as one world, with interchangable characters; his focus on each novel as a discrete work of art is critically correct, and it allows him to trace the development of Austen as an artist. I recommend the book for the serious student of Austen.