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eBook Imagining the Urban: Sanskrit and the City in Early India (Opus 1) ePub

eBook Imagining the Urban: Sanskrit and the City in Early India (Opus 1) ePub

by Shonaleeka Kaul

  • ISBN: 1906497818
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Shonaleeka Kaul
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Seagull Books (March 15, 2011)
  • Pages: 278
  • ePub book: 1288 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1100 kb
  • Other: rtf azw txt rtf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 281

Description

In Imagining the Urban, Shonaleeka Kaul turns to Sanskrit literature . .With its provocative new questions about early Indian cities and ancient Indian texts, this book will be an essential read for scholars of urban history, Sanskrit writings, and South Asian antiquity.

In Imagining the Urban, Shonaleeka Kaul turns to Sanskrit literature .

Imagining the Urban book. Her book gives us a fresh view of the early city, showing distinctive urban ways of thought and behaviour which relate in complex ways to tradition, morality, and authority. In advocating Sanskrit kāvyas as an important historical source, it addresses not just ancient India specialists but also scholars of literary history: the kāvyas rework history, says Kaul, providing us with ‘transhistoricity’ rather than ‘ahistoricity’.

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SHONALEEKA KAUL: Imagining the Urban. Sanskrit and the City in Early India. 2 One will be reconstructed primarily from a handful of epigraphic records, and the other from an extended and well-known textual hagiography. These cases have some striking historical resonances with one another, and together present us with an insight into the contours of friendship and affiliation in Chola South India. They deal with parallel arenas of social interaction where male companionship was highly valued-the sphere of courtly/military societies on the one hand and the realm of religious mendicancy on the other hand.

Imagining The Urban (Sanskrit and the City in Early India).

I acknowledge with gratitude my debt to the publications in which many of the articles included here were originally published. Imagining The Urban (Sanskrit and the City in Early India).

In Imagining the Urban, Shonaleeka Kaul turns to Sanskrit literature to discover the  .

In Imagining the Urban, Shonaleeka Kaul turns to Sanskrit literature to discover the physical and social-of ancient Indian cities. Kaul examines nearly a thousand years of Sanskrit kāvyas to see what India’s early historic cities were like as living, lived-in, entities-and discovers that the cities were vibrant and teeming with variety and life.

Jan Gonda Fellowship for Indology and Sanskrit Studies at International Institute of Asian Studies, Leiden University, 2014.

Early Indian History, with special emphasis on classical Sanskrit literature (kāvya), Cultural history, History of ideas, Behavioural history, Gender, Urbanism, Literary theory, Cultural transmission, Regional Studies, History of Early Kashmir. Experience: 16 years. Jan Gonda Fellowship for Indology and Sanskrit Studies at International Institute of Asian Studies, Leiden University, 2014. Dinakar Singh Distinguished Lecturership in South Asian Studies in the Department of History, Yale University, 2007-08.

In Imagining the Urban, Shonaleeka Kaul turns to Sanskrit literature to discover the characteristics—both physical and social—of ancient Indian cities. Kaul examines nearly a thousand years of Sanskrit kāvyas to see what India’s early historic cities were like as living, lived-in, entities—and discovers that the cities were vibrant and teeming with variety and life.

As much about Sanskrit literature as about urban spaces—insofar as that literature reveals significant aspects of the Indian urban past— Imagining the Urban shows that Sanskrit literature is a rich source for historical understanding. Advocating the  kāvyas as an important historical source, Kaul provides a fresh view of the early city, showing distinctive ways of thought and behavior that relate to tradition, morality, and authority.

With its provocative new questions about early Indian cities and ancient Indian texts, this book will be an essential read for scholars of urban history, Sanskrit writings, and South Asian antiquity.