cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Roman Gaze: Vision, Power, and the Body (Arethusa Books)
eBook The Roman Gaze: Vision, Power, and the Body (Arethusa Books) ePub

eBook The Roman Gaze: Vision, Power, and the Body (Arethusa Books) ePub

by David Fredrick

  • ISBN: 0801869617
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: David Fredrick
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (November 18, 2002)
  • Pages: 352
  • ePub book: 1291 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1928 kb
  • Other: lrf azw doc lrf
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 764

Description

Contributors draw upon a wide range of theoretical methods, using visual and body theory from various fields and period specializations.

The Roman Gaze: Vision, Power, and the Body uses the concept of the gaze. Contributors draw upon a wide range of theoretical methods, using visual and body theory from various fields and period specializations. Topics include violence and The Roman Gaze: Vision, Power, and the Body uses the concept of "the gaze" to examine literary, visual, and material evidence that reveals the contribution of ancient Rome to the development of Western culture.

Boldly interdisciplinary, The Roman Gaze will interest readers in history, classics, literature, art, and . Contributors draw upon a wide range of theoretical methods, using visual and body theory from various fields and period specializations

Boldly interdisciplinary, The Roman Gaze will interest readers in history, classics, literature, art, and cinema. Contributors: Carlin Barton, Cindy Benton, John R. Clarke, Anthony Corbeill, Katherine Owen Eldred, David Fredrick, Pamela Gordon, Zahra Newby, and Alison R. Sharrock. Topics include violence and gender in Senecan theater, literary representations of erotic love within a hierarchical and violent Rome, and the differing appeal of artistic depictions designed for visual consumption by both genders.

Furthermore, Fredrick's collection is the first book-length work devoted to applications of vision theory in Classics-Greek or Roman-at a time when the topic is beginning to find a larger audience. The collection is overall of very high quality and is well unified, with a bibliography that is an invaluable resource in its own right. The book's audience will be primarily classicists interested in gender studies and in theories of vision; non-specialists are likely to find the level of sophistication that marks the individual contributions rather daunting.

Similar books and articles. Roman Visual Dynamics D. Fredrick (E. : The Roman Gaze. Some Unseen Monster: Rereading Lucretius on Sex. Pamela Gordon - 2002 - In David Fredrick (e., The Roman Gaze. Vision, Power, and the Body. Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002. Vision, Power and the Body. Johns Hopkins University Press. The Body in Western and Chinese Medicine : Discourses and Practices. Diane M. Lemire - unknown.

Boldly interdisciplinary, The Roman Gaze will interest readers in history, classics, literature, art, and cinema.

Contributors draw upon a wide range of theoretical methods, using visual and body theory from various fields and period specializations. The Roman Gaze will interest readers in history, classics, literature, art, and cinema.

Aristophanes and the Carnival of Genres. Gendered Dynamics in Latin Love Poetry. Imperial Projections. Ancient Rome in Modern Popular Culture.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Roman Gaze: Vision, Power, and the . The Roman Gaze Vision, Power, and the Body. Read full description.

Johns Hopkins University Press. Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H). 0 x . 6 x . 4 Inches.

The Roman gaze: vision, power, and the body more. Publication Date: Jan 1, 2002. Publication Name: The Roman Gaze: Vision, Power and the Body. Haptic Poetics more.

The Roman Gaze: Vision, Power, and the Body uses the concept of "the gaze" to examine literary, visual, and material evidence that reveals the contribution of ancient Rome to the development of Western culture. Contributors draw upon a wide range of theoretical methods, using visual and body theory from various fields and period specializations. Topics include violence and gender in Senecan theater, literary representations of erotic love within a hierarchical and violent Rome, and the differing appeal of artistic depictions designed for visual consumption by both genders. Boldly interdisciplinary, The Roman Gaze will interest readers in history, classics, literature, art, and cinema.

Contributors: Carlin Barton, Cindy Benton, John R. Clarke, Anthony Corbeill, Katherine Owen Eldred, David Fredrick, Pamela Gordon, Zahra Newby, and Alison R. Sharrock.