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eBook Memoranda During the War ePub

eBook Memoranda During the War ePub

by Walt Whitman

  • ISBN: 1557091323
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Walt Whitman
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Applewood Books (February 1, 1990)
  • Pages: 96
  • ePub book: 1236 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1875 kb
  • Other: docx txt lit rtf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 405

Description

Title: Memoranda During the War. Author(s): Walt Whitman. Source: Memoranda During the War (Camden, NJ, 1875–1876). Transcribed from digital images of an original copy.

Title: Memoranda During the War. Whitman Archive ID: pp. 1875. Contributors to digital file: Brett Barney, Ashley Lawson, Elizabeth McClurg, Kenneth M. Price, Elizabeth Lorang, Joshua Ware, Kevin McMullen, and Nicole Gray. Cite this page: Walt Whitman. Memoranda During the War. 1875–1876. The Walt Whitman Archive. Gen. ed. Ed Folsom and Kenneth M. Price.

Memoranda During the War is Whitman's testament to the anguish, heroism, and terror of the Civil War. The book consists of journal entries extending from Whitman's arrival on the front in 1862 through to the war's conclusion in 1865.

Электронная книга "Memoranda During the War: Civil War Journals, 1863-1865", Walt Whitman

Электронная книга "Memoranda During the War: Civil War Journals, 1863-1865", Walt Whitman. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Memoranda During the War: Civil War Journals, 1863-1865" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

book called Memoranda During the War. He then contacted Emerson, this time to ask for help in obtaining a government post. Another friend, John Trowbridge, passed on a letter of recommendation from Emerson to Salmon P. Chase, Secretary of the Treasury, hoping he would grant Whitman a position in that department The Whitman family had a difficult end to 1864

Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). While working at the Patent Office during the war, Whitman volunteered much time caring and tending the wounded at the many Civil War hospitals that sprang up to take care of the men. Whitman would bring the men simple treats, such as fruit, or paper, or things to read, and spend hours tending to these brave men. This book is a recollection, however brief, of those times he spent caring for the men, including some important events of the time.

Whitman recorded his impressions of Abraham Lincoln, whom he frequently encountered on the city streets, and his thoughts on the conflict's day-to-day and historical significance. His evocative, poetic reflections offer a unique portrait of Civil War life.

Memoranda During the War - Walt Whitman. Bibliographical Note. The intended fusion of the book Whitman describes here never happened, but Memoranda During the War, read with his other treatments of the war, is indeed a unique contribution. I have many hospital incidents,. I have many hospital incidents, will take with the general reader.

Memoranda during the War book. The book In December of 1862, having read his brother's name in a casualty list, Walt Whitman rushed from Brooklyn to the war front, where he found his brother wounded but recovering. But Whitman also found there a "new world," a world dense with horror and revelation. Memoranda During the War is Whitman's testament to the anguish, heroism, and terror of the Civil War.

The book consists of journal entries extending from Whitman's arrival on the front in 1862 through to the war's conclusion in 1865.

Memoranda During the War. 1 5 Author: Walt Whitman Narrator: Robert Gorman. The real war will never get in the books," Walt Whitman wrote in this diary he kept during the Civil War. Whitman chronicled his visits to Washington, . hospitals where he comforted wounded men and assisted nurses and doctors.

Walt Whitman spent much of his time with wounded soldiers, both in the field and in the hospitals. The 40 notebooks he filled became the basis for this extraordinary diary of a medic in the Civil War.

Comments

Kuve Kuve
I haven't finished it yet, I'm 3 CD's in and I love it. The narration is beautiful, the writing is Whitman so you can't go wrong. Very informative, insightful, and entertaining.
Jonariara Jonariara
Gruesomely realistic and poetically written!
Walt Whitman is a master writer!
I would recommend this book only to those interested in the reality of war.
Wrathmaster Wrathmaster
How many stars to give a wonderful book with a long winded DREADFUL introduction?

Whitman's original work is splendid.

Some obscure associate professor wrote a long winded introduction that adds NOTHING to this book. Worse than adding nothing to this book, this introduction contains spoilers. SKIP THIS INTRODUCTION!
Gorisar Gorisar
Avoid this edition at all hazards! Coviello's introduction is merely a celebration of Whitman's homosexuality, a fact that, in truth, has no bearing on the narrative whatsoever. Look for the Applewood Books edition. It can be had much cheaper and contains Whitman's words only.
Dagdalas Dagdalas
This review is solely of the CD recording of "Drum-Taps and Memoranda during the War," read by Bronson Pinchot.

The text of "Memoranda" is that of Whitman's limited edition of 1875-76. This review has nothing to do with later editions or reprints or academic commentaries.

Some of us remember Bronson Pinchot from the 1980s when he played the goofy Balki in the TV sitcom "Perfect Strangers." All I can say is, what a transformation!

In the intervening years Pinchot has morphed into an absolutely brilliant reader of Walt Whitman's prose and poetry. Here he reads Whitman's words, written mostly during and shortly after the Civil War, with an expressiveness and authority that I've rarely heard on audio - and I've heard some excellent readers (some duds, too). As a native New Yorker whose grandparents were born while Whitman was still living, I can testify that Pinchot even has the old-time NYC *accent* down! A very brief recording exists of Whitman's own voice (we think) made by Edison about 1890, and Pinchot sounds like he recorded it himself.

Furthermore, the two books he reads here are fundamental literary documents of the Civil War. The "Memoranda" consist of notes Whitman made from time to time beginning after the battle of Fredericksburg in December, 1862, when he began to visit the sick and wounded in army hospitals in Washington. "Drum-Taps" is his well-known 1866 collection of poems inspired by the war. The suffering and stoicism of soldiers recorded in the "Memoranda" are often heart-breaking: Whitman in reality was one of the most compassionate men of letters America has ever produced, and Pinchot captures every nuance. You will not get a more concise and effective *emotional* sense of what the Civil War was like anywhere. The poems are typical Walt: visionary paeans to a truly democratic America that, he thought, might yet be even after the awful upheaval of the war and the hatreds it unleashed.

I prefer the prose to the poetry (except for the magnificent "Come up from the Fields, Father" and one or two others). But no matter. It is all fascinating stuff, beautifully and dramatically read.

Words of genius read by an interpreter of genius. If you have any interest in either the Civil War or Walt Whitman, you must not miss this recording.
Rich Vulture Rich Vulture
Walt Whitman, upon hearing the news of the wounding of his brother George at the battle of Fredericksburg , took off from New York City to find him on the battlefields of Virginia. After discovering him at a hospital, and spending time with his company, Whitman decided to live in Washington DC. His sojourn there, which last many years, is brilliantly recounted in the simple book "Memoranda During the War".

While working at the Patent Office during the war, Whitman volunteered much time caring and tending the wounded at the many Civil War hospitals that sprang up to take care of the men. Whitman would bring the men simple treats, such as fruit, or paper, or things to read, and spend hours tending to these brave men. This book is a recollection, however brief, of those times he spent caring for the men, including some important events of the time.

While people learn about the history of the Civil War by memorizing dates and places, they often miss the impact of the Civil War. Whitman's book brings the impact of this war into real contexts. Even he, in his writing, says that the true reality of this war may be unknowable to those who would never see it. Whitman attempts to correct this by telling stories of the wounded soldiers he tends; stories of battles; and a particularly gruesome story of a raid gone bad and its horrific consequences.

Whitman's prose is succinct and touching. The few soldier's lives he manages to capture on paper, some in just a few sentences, are compelling. Anyone wanting to understand this war certainly should spend an hour with Whitman as he describes his small part in this grand conflict, for with his words, comes a grander understanding of this war.
Beazerdred Beazerdred
How great that this amazing book was liberated from the dusty

shelves of the Library of Congress rare books collection.

In a weird way, it's sort of like Walt Whitman's "On The Road,"

except HIS On the Road was the Civil War. It's a touching, sad,

glorious & never boring book. Perhaps the most incredible thing about the prose is how "modern" it reads; and isn't it sad, about humanity in general, how Walt's accounts from 1862-1865 are still TOTALLY relevant today, in 2005; and will probably remain TOTALLY

relevant for as long as human beings occupy this blood-stained planet.