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eBook Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson, Fiction, Classics ePub

eBook Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson, Fiction, Classics ePub

by Robert Louis Stevenson

  • ISBN: 0809567342
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Wildside Press (August 1, 2004)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1676 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1273 kb
  • Other: lrf rtf doc lit
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 428

Description

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON was born in Edinburgh in 1850. Robert louis stevenson.

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON was born in Edinburgh in 1850. The son of a prosperous civil engineer, he was expected to follow the family profession but finally was allowed to study law at Edinburgh University. Stevenson reacted violently against the Presbyterian respectability of the city’s professional classes and this led to painful clashes with his parents.

Robert Louis Stevenson Kidnapped is a historical fiction adventure novel by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, written as a boys' novel and first published in the magazine Young Folks from.

Robert Louis Stevenson. The story grew out of a map that led to imaginary treasure, devised during a holiday in Scotland by Stevenson and his nephew. Kidnapped is a historical fiction adventure novel by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, written as a boys' novel and first published in the magazine Young Folks from May to July 1886. The novel has attracted the praise and admiration of writers as diverse as Henry James, Jorge Luis Borges, and Hilary Mantel.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) was born in Edinburgh. He began his writing career as an essayist and travel writer, but the success of Treasure Island (1883) and Kidnapped (1886) established his reputation for tales of adventure and action. During the final years of his life, Stevenson's creative range developed and he wrote "The Beach of Falesa" and began "The Weir of Hermiston.

If schooners, islands, and maroons, And buccaneers, and buried gold, And all the old romance, retold.

an American gentleman in accordance with whose classic taste the following narrative has been designed, it is now, in return for numerous delightful hours, and with the kindest wishes, dedicated by his affectionate friend, the author. To the hesitating purchaser. If sailor tales to sailor tunes, Storm and adventure, heat and cold, If schooners, islands, and maroons, And buccaneers, and buried gold, And all the old romance, retold.

Treasure Island book

Treasure Island book.

Robert Louis Stevenson was a Scottish novelist and travel writer, most noted for Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and A Child's Garden of Verses. A celebrity in his lifetime, Stevenson attracted a more negative critical response for much of the 20th century, though his reputation has been largely restored. Author: Robert Louis Stevenson.

Robert Louis Stevenson

Robert Louis Stevenson. A heady mix of thrills, mystery, atmosphere and memorable characters, Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson is a classic adventure story that has enthralled both young and old alike ever since it was first published in 1883. Right from the racy opening chapter where the young hero Jim Hawkins encounters a mysterious guest, Billy Bones, at the Admiral Benbow Inn run by his widowed mother, the tale carries the reader off on an edge-of-the-seat roller-coaster ride of non-stop action and drama.

It was a map of an island. There was some writing on the map. It said: Treasure here. Everybody ran to see the island. I waited for a minute, then I climbed out of the barrel and ran, too. The ship was now quite near an island. Does anybody know this island? Captain Smollett asked.

Author: Robert Stevenson. by Robert Louis Stevenson1. Part I. THE OLD BUCCANEER. Chapter I. the old sea dog at the "Admiral benbow"2.

That blow was the last of the battle. Once out upon the road, Black Dog, in spite of his wound, showed a wonderful clean pair of heels and disappeared over the edge of the hill in half a minute. The captain, for his part, stood staring at the signboard like a bewildered man. Then he passed his hand over his eyes several times and at last turned back into the house. "Jim," says he, "rum"; and as he spoke, he reeled a little, and caught himself with one hand against the wall. "Are you hurt?" cried I. "Rum," he repeated. "I must get away from here. Rum! Rum!" I ran to fetch it, but I was quite unsteadied by all that had fallen out, and I broke one glass and fouled the tap, and while I was still getting in my own way, I heard a loud fall in the parlor, and running in, beheld the captain lying full length upon the floor. At the same instant my mother, alarmed by the cries and fighting, came running downstairs to help me. Between us we raised his head. He was breathing very loud and hard, but his eyes were closed and his face a horrible color.

Comments

DarK-LiGht DarK-LiGht
I would give this review zero stars if I could. This is not a legit book but rather some bound version of a combo typed/xerox copy of the original, made in the USA, San Bernardino, California, 25 June 2017, 3 days ago, upon my order apparently.

This was going to be a gift for a 9 year old looking to engage further in chapter reading. No longer.

I thought a rollicking pirate adventure, illustrated by N. C. Wyeth, might be fun. This poor replica is anything but fun...the cover is pixelated and the illustration plates are muddied grays, and I haven't even addressed how a 9-year old is going to try to read the disjointed copy spacing and chapter headings, as well as typos and misspellings. Please see photos.

On top of this my copy was bent and sticky, go figure packing crew.

100% dissatisfied long-term Amazon customer.
Magis Magis
Treasure Island was written 130 years ago and it remains one of the great adventure tales of all time. I originally read it when I was about ten years old and, fifty years later, I recently re-read it in the Kindle edition. The fact that the book brings as much pleasure now as it did then is an indication of how good it really is. Stevenson truly hit the ball out of the park with this one.

Much has been remarked in many of these critiques about the outdated language Stevenson used. In that regard, I have to say that the Kindle edition that I downloaded lacks one thing that was included in my old printed edition, which was published by MacMillan way back in 1924. The old edition has a set of notes following the text, explaining a lot of the nautical terms and old-fashioned jargon. It even includes the complete lyrics to "A Bottle of Rum". I never found those notes necessary but they might prove useful to some of the younger readers, to whom such language might be unfamiliar. Personally, I think the language is part of what has given this tale it's lasting appeal. In addition, I don't know whether 18th Century pirates really spoke the way Stevenson has them speak in Treasure Island, but there is no doubt that it is the way they will forever be remembered, "...and ye may lay to that, Matey"!
Fiarynara Fiarynara
I just finished reading this terrific story on Kindle (ASIN: B00LP34EKI). Since Amazon lumps together all reviews for similarly titled products I've included the ASIN number so you know which version of this book I'm referring to. There are 10 illustrations and photos at the very end of the book. Only three are about this story with the rest being various photos of the author as a child, a young man, etc. You can do a lot better just by doing an image search "Treasure Island". I won't rehash the story here since it's quite well known by everyone already or at least the framework of the story is.

Some of the nautical terms and pirate jargon in the story were unfamiliar to me and I found the CliffNotes Treasure Island Glossary to be very useful in understanding them. It defines terms like alow and aloft; assizes; dead-eye; my cock, as in rooster and meaning a fine young man (that one tripped me up for a few seconds) and many others. Amazon won't let me post a link to it so just do a search for "Full Glossary for Treasure Island - CliffsNotes". It'll probably be the first hit in the list and it's free.

There are many images on the Web for Treasure Island. I did a Search for 'Treasure Island Map' and I found one that helped in getting a better idea of where action was taking place. I hope you enjoy the story and if you have young children why not read it aloud with them.

By the way, if you want to see the film I highly recommend you watch the 1950 Disney version starring Robert Newton as Long John Silver. One RottenTomatoes critic said this; "Newton's Long John Silver is the ultimate buccaneer, a one-legged, squinty-eyed blackguard so piratical he even concludes a prayer with a hammy 'Ahhhhhrrrmen...'" And Silver could also be the most charming, silver-tongued devil around when it suited him.
Enjoy
Yanki Yanki
My recent read of The Brethren Prince The Brethren Prince: Piracy, Revenge, and the Culture Clash of the Old Caribbean got me thinking of Treasure Island, which I had read 45+ years ago, as a boy. I decided it was time to give the book a second look. I enjoyed it. 'Twas easy to see, written as it was, from young Jim Hawkin's perspective, how this was a book tailored to boys. Of course, Jim sure had a lot of good luck, to make it through the entire (mis)adventure. Some of that luck, and a few actions of characters, were far-fetched enough that I can not award a full five stars for this literary classic.

I remembered little of this story, from my earlier read. The old style language would have been pretty difficult for a typical, young baby boomer -- and, I expect I had gone through some segments with only a general idea of what was happening. Perhaps my book had had a bit of glossary, as another recent reader recalled from his childhood reading. It would be a good book to read along with a young person, to explain terms and quaint language, and to look up items, together.

As a viewer of Black Sails, I noted that three of the characters in the series were lifted from Treasure Island, as a bit of Googling confirmed that, indeed, they are fictional: Billy Bones, John Silver, Captain Flint.