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eBook The Regime of the Brother: After the Patriarchy (Opening Out: Feminism for Today) ePub

eBook The Regime of the Brother: After the Patriarchy (Opening Out: Feminism for Today) ePub

by Juliet Flower MacCannell

  • ISBN: 0415054354
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Juliet Flower MacCannell
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (June 29, 1991)
  • Pages: 240
  • ePub book: 1437 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1926 kb
  • Other: docx lrf rtf mobi
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 186

Description

Juliet Flower MacCannell's earlier book Figuring Lacan: Criticism And The Cultural Unconscious was, for the most part, a straightforward introduction to the thought of Jacques Lacan.

Juliet Flower MacCannell's earlier book Figuring Lacan: Criticism And The Cultural Unconscious was, for the most part, a straightforward introduction to the thought of Jacques Lacan. The Regime of the Brother, by contrast, is a much more difficult and challenging reflection on the political consequences of Lacan's ideas. Before I get into the substance of this book, I want to pause for a moment and reflect on its style

by Juliet Flower MacCannell First published 1991. Regime of the Brother: After the Patriarchy (ebook).

by Juliet Flower MacCannell First published 1991. Published June 13th 1991 by Routledge.

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Juliet Flower MacCannell. The Regime of the Brother is one of the first attempts to challenge modernity on its own terms. Using the work of Lacan, Kristeva and Freud, Juliet MacCannell confronts the failure of modernity to bring about the social equality promised by the Enlightenment. On the verge of its destruction, the Patriarchy has reshaped itself into a new, and often more oppressive regime: that of the Brother.

The Regime of the Brother is one of the first attempts to challenge modernity on its own terms. Using the work of Lacan, Kristeva and Freud, Juliet MacCannell confronts the failure of modernity to bring about the social equality promised by the Enlightenment

The Regime of the Brother is one of the first attempts to challenge modernity on its own terms.

by. MacCannell, Juliet Flower, 1943-. Book Cover; Title; Contents; Series preface; Acknowledgements; Note on passages translated; Introduction; The primal scene of modernity; Modernity as the absence of the other: the general self; Egomimesis; Feminine Eros: from the bourgeois state to the nuclear state; The end(s) of love in the western world; The reconstruction of mothering; After the new Regime; Notes; Passages translated; Index.

Using the work of Lacan, Kristeva and Freud, Juliet MacCannell confronts the failure of modernity to bring about the social equality promised by the Enlightenment.

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by Juliet Flower MacCannell.

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Home Browse Books Book details, The Regime of the Brother: After the Patriarchy. The Regime of the Brother: After the Patriarchy. By Juliet Flower Maccannell. The Regime of the Brotheris one of the first attempts to challenge modernity on its own terms.

Using the work of Lacan, Kristeva and Freud, Juliet MacCannell confronts the failure of modernity to bring about the . On the verge of its destruction, the Patriarchy has reshaped itself into a new, and often more oppressive regime: that of the Brother

The Regime of the Brother is one of the first attempts to challenge modernity on its own terms. Using the work of Lacan, Kristeva and Freud, Juliet MacCannell confronts the failure of modernity to bring about the social equality promised by the Enlightenment. On the verge of its destruction, the Patriarchy has reshaped itself into a new, and often more oppressive regime: that of the Brother. Examining a range of literary and social texts - from Rousseau's Confessions to Richardson's Clarissa and from Stendhal's De L'Amour to James's What Maisie Knew and Jean Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea - MacCannell illustrates a history of the suppression of women, revealing the potential for a specifically feminine alternative.