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eBook The Best of the Achaeans: Concepts of the Hero in Archaic Greek Poetry ePub

eBook The Best of the Achaeans: Concepts of the Hero in Archaic Greek Poetry ePub

by Professor Gregory Nagy

  • ISBN: 0801823889
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Professor Gregory Nagy
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press; 1st edition (August 1, 1981)
  • Pages: 414
  • ePub book: 1656 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1438 kb
  • Other: lrf azw txt mbr
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 867

Description

The CHS is dedicated to the reassertion of the humanism of the ancient world, centering on Hellenic civilization in its widest sense.

The CHS is dedicated to the reassertion of the humanism of the ancient world, centering on Hellenic civilization in its widest sense.

I've read plenty of books by Harvard/MIT leaders in their field that were neither dumbed down nor lacking in clear prose. Steven Pinker's books come readily to mind

Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). I've read plenty of books by Harvard/MIT leaders in their field that were neither dumbed down nor lacking in clear prose. Steven Pinker's books come readily to mind. It seemed to me that rather than offering insight, Nagy was trying to make it obtuse.

In the end, I feel like I got a lot out of reading "The Best of the Achaeans," specifically in how I approach reading Greek texts. Though one can read this book without understanding Greek, I suspect that it will prove daunting.

Gregory Nagy (Hungarian: Nagy Gergely, pronounced ; born Budapest, October 22, 1942) is an American professor of Classics at Harvard University, specializing in Homer and archaic Greek poetry

Gregory Nagy (Hungarian: Nagy Gergely, pronounced ; born Budapest, October 22, 1942) is an American professor of Classics at Harvard University, specializing in Homer and archaic Greek poetry. Nagy is known for extending Milman Parry and Albert Lord's theories about the oral rmance of the Iliad and Odyssey. Nagy received his . from Indiana University in 1962 in classics and linguistics, and his P. from Harvard University in 1966 in classical philology.

Despite widespread interest in the Greek hero as a cult figure, little was written about the relationship between the cult practices and the portrayals of the hero in poetry. The Best of the Achaeans is indispensable to anyone interested in archaic Greek literature, especially Greek Epic. One will find in it unique insights and useful information about multiples aspects of the hero. Nagy's original thinking and mastery of historical linguistics allows him to perceive connections unnoticed or overlooked by most classicists.

The Best of the Achaeans: Concepts of the Hero in Archaic Greek Poetry (Johns Hopkins University Press), which won the Goodwin Award of Merit, American Philological Association, in 1982; also Pindar's Homer: The Lyric Possession of an Epic Past (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins.

Despite widespread interest in the Greek hero as a cult figure, little was written about the relationship between the cult practices and the portrayals of the hero in poetry. The first edition of The Best of the Achaeans bridged that gap, raising new questions about what could be known or conjectured about Greek heroes. In this revised edition, which features a new preface by the author, Gregory Nagy reconsiders his conclusions in the light of the subsequent debate and resumes his discussion of the special status of heroes in ancient Greek life and poetry. His book remains an engaging introduction both to the concept of the hero in Hellenic civilization and to the poetic forms through which the hero is defined: the Iliad and Odyssey in particular and archaic Greek poetry in general.

Comments

Gardagar Gardagar
An excellent followup to Dr. Nagy's Greek Heroes
Linn Linn
I read the first edition of this book in the early 80s when I was in college, and I have to say that few books stimulated my thought about Greek literature and language as well as this book did. Nagy's thesis is interesting and contoversial (there was quite a bit of debate about it in successive issues of the NY Review of Books), and while I don't wish to give a synopsis of his main points without having read the book in such a long time, I can assure you that his intellectual rigour and clear, beautiful writing will, at the least, help you to new perspectives on the Iliad and the Odyssey. I'm buying myself a new copy right now!
Uanabimo Uanabimo
The Best of the Achaeans is indispensable to anyone interested in archaic Greek literature, especially Greek Epic. One will find in it unique insights and useful information about multiples aspects of the hero. Nagy's original thinking and mastery of historical linguistics allows him to perceive connections unnoticed or overlooked by most classicists.
Yayrel Yayrel
First I gave it three stars. Then I realized it was just to make me look smarter. Gregory Nagy is deemed a great scholar. Maybe that's unfair. Maybe he is a great scholar and I should not qualify it. For me, the classics are a hobby. I didn't want to feel like I was a high school basketball player saying that something like Dennis Rodman didn't know how to box out his man by giving it too few stars. But, then I realized, okay, I'm a mere babe in the woods compared to him - maybe not learned enough to be his student, but, on the other hand, I have read many books on ancient Greece and many books on Homer. And, I think before I understood and liked almost all of them - the only exception being a book I thought was too simplistic. Many of them contain bits of Homeric Greek and though I am not a scholar, I get by well enough.

And . . . I didn't really like this book. There, I said it. I found it too difficult. I don't mean so difficult that I couldn't understand it at all. But difficult enough so that I didn't want to work hard enough to work through it. And it didn't have to be that way. I've read plenty of books by Harvard/MIT leaders in their field that were neither dumbed down nor lacking in clear prose. Steven Pinker's books come readily to mind. It seemed to me that rather than offering insight, Nagy was trying to make it obtuse. But, perhaps that is unfair and he does not have a grasp on what is intelligible to others.

But, I didn't get his translations either. I don't mean I thought he should have used "rage" instead of "anger" somewhere of that he inserted a word in a sentence that I didn't think was called for in order to give it a flavor he thought was implied. I mean that I would look at a translation of almost every line he translated and think - Say what? But, he's Dennis Rodman and I'm not.

So, I could have rated it three stars, was just about to, in fact, but then I realized that's how the Emperor ends up with no clothes - people trying to make believe they are in on it - whatever "it" may be in some case. And I'm also remembering my Epictetus - If you want to make progress, let people think you are a mindless fool about externals, and do not desire a reputation for knowing about them. So, if I'm a fool, I still didn't like it. I didn't like it and that's why I'm giving it two stars. God, I hope I never meet him. He'll beat me with a scepter.