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eBook The Power of the Story: Fiction and Political Change ePub

eBook The Power of the Story: Fiction and Political Change ePub

by Michael Hanne

  • ISBN: 1571810196
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Michael Hanne
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Berghahn Books; 1 edition (December 1, 1994)
  • Pages: 272
  • ePub book: 1295 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1424 kb
  • Other: mbr mobi doc docx
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 361

Description

This book explores that general question through the close examination of five works, from several different countries and periods, for which remarkable direct political effects of one kind or. .Political Fiction-History And Criticism.

This book explores that general question through the close examination of five works, from several different countries and periods, for which remarkable direct political effects of one kind or another have been claimed. It is an inquiry both at the level of theory (in what sense, and by what mechanisms, might literary works conceivably be said to start wars, swing national opinion, and so on?) and at the level of history (what evidence can be gathered on the influence which a particular fictional narrative has had in a given place and at a given time?).

Forcefully argued and written with a minimum of jargon, this book no doubt appeals to a wide readership well beyond that of the specialist in literature.

this highly readable study is an impressive work ofcontemporary criticism, richly deserving of its intended general and academic audiences. Forcefully argued and written with a minimum of jargon, this book no doubt appeals to a wide readership well beyond that of the specialist in literature.

Select Format: Hardcover. T)his highly readable study is an impressive work of contemporary criticism, richly deserving its intended general and academic audiences. ISBN13:9780826407849.

Berghahn Books, 1994 - 262 sayfa

Berghahn Books, 1994 - 262 sayfa.

Fiction and Political Change. The author explores this question in the form of a theoretical essay on narrative and power, followed by five detailed case studies of works by Turgenev, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Ignazio Silone, Solzhenitsyn and Salman Rushdie, each of which had or was said to have had a major impact on the political events in its time.

Can a novel cause riots, start a war, free serfs or slaves, break up marriages, drive readers to suicide, close factories, bring about law change, swing an election, or serve as a weapon in a national or international struggle? The author explores this question in the form of a theoretical essay on narrative and power, followed by five detailed case studies of works by Turgenev, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Ignazio Silone, Solzhenitsyn and Salman Rushdie, each of which had or was said to have had a major impact on the political events in its time.

A. Davidson}, year {1996} }. Published 1994 by Berghahn Books in Providence, . Ivan Turgenev : A sportsman's notebook (1852). History and criticism, Fiction, Political fiction. Harriet Beecher Stowe : Uncle Tom's cabin (1852). Ignazio Silone : Fontamara (1933). Alexander Solzhenitsyn : One day in the life of Ivan Denisovich (1962). Salman Rushdie : The satanic verses (1988). Includes bibliographical references (p. -256) and index.

Michael Hanne does not, it is true, claim that either Silone or Solzhenitsyn produced a decisive change in the . The Power of the Story: Fiction and Political Change.

Michael Hanne does not, it is true, claim that either Silone or Solzhenitsyn produced a decisive change in the way the society they described ran its affairs, and he is even more modest in the case of The Satanic Verses. It is nevertheless the chapter dealing with Salman Rushdie's novel which puts forward the most convincing thesis. Register to continue.

Can a novel cause riots, start a war, free serfs or slaves, break up marriages, drive readers to suicide, close factories, bring about law change, swing an election, or serve as a weapon in a national or international struggle? The author explores this question in the form of a theoretical essay on narrative and power, followed by five detailed case studies of works by Turgenev, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Ignazio Silone, Solzhenitsyn and Salman Rushdie, each of which had or was said to have had a major impact on the political events in its time. Forcefully argued and written with a minimum of jargon, this book no doubt appeals to a wide readership well beyond that of the specialist in literature.