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eBook The Oxford Shakespeare: Henry IV, Part 2 (Oxford World's Classics) ePub

eBook The Oxford Shakespeare: Henry IV, Part 2 (Oxford World's Classics) ePub

by René Weis,William Shakespeare

  • ISBN: 0199537135
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: René Weis,William Shakespeare
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Clarendon Press; Reissue edition (April 15, 2009)
  • Pages: 304
  • ePub book: 1683 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1160 kb
  • Other: mobi rtf docx azw
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 764

Description

Oxford University Press first published a complete works of Shakespeare in 1891.

Introduction and Shakespeare's Career in the Theater: Jonathan Bate. Henry IV believes that one of the failings of his predecessor Richard II had been to seek to make himself popular, thus eroding the necessary distance that creates awe and gives mystique to the monarchy. But King Henry's own distance from public life-he is nearly always seen surrounded by an inner circle of courtiers or closeted alone in his chamber-causes power to ebb from him.

Punctuation in Shakespeare's time was as much rhetorical as grammatical. Colon" was originally a term for a unit of thought in an argument. The semicolon was a new unit of punctuation (some of the Quartos lack them altogether). The rejected Folio ("F") reading is then given.

William Shakespeare Henry IV, Part 2 (Oxford World's Classics) (P. ). ISBN 13: 9780198123644. Henry IV, Part 2 (Oxford World's Classics) (P. The stirring continuation of the themes begun in Henry IV, Part One again pits a rebellion within the State and that master of misrule, Falstaff, against the maturing of Prince Hal. Alternating scenes between bawdy tavern and regal court, between revelry and politics, Shakespeare probes at the sources, uses, and responsibilities of power as an old king dies and a young king must choose between a ruler's solemn duty and a merry but dissipated friend, Falstaff.

The Oxford Shakespeare: Henry IV, Part 2 (Oxford World's Classics) by William Shakespeare Paperback .

Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Henry V, the climax of Shakespeare's sequence of English history plays, is an inspiring, often comic celebration of a young warrior-king. But it is also a study of the costly exhilarations of war, and of the penalties as well as the glories of human greatness. Gary Taylor is Professor of English, Brandeis University.

Other books in this series. 26% off. Henry IV, Part 2: The Oxford Shakespeare.

Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more. Other books in this series.

William Shakespeare, Rene Weis. Henry IV, Part 2 is the only play in the canon whose structure almost exactly mirrors that of its predecessor, and thereby affords unique perspectives on Shakespeares art and craft. Far from being the impoverished country cousin of an illustrious work, Part 2 introduces unforgettable new characters like Pistol and Shallow, and memorable minor players such as Doll Tearsheet and the reluctant Goucestershire recruits. Above all, it gives us more Falstaff.

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Oxford Shakespeare is without doubt an important publishing event. a workman-like survey of most of what has been known and thought about the play up to the time of going to press'.

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This edition offers a fully modernized text of one of Shakespeare's most fascinating plays. Henry IV, Part 2 is the only play in the canon whose structure almost exactly mirrors that of its predecessor, and thereby affords unique perspectives on Shakespeare's art and craft. Far from being the impoverished country cousin of an illustrious work, Part 2 introduces unforgettable new characters like Pistol and Shallow, and memorable minor players such as Doll Tearsheet and the reluctant Goucestershire recruits. Above all, it gives us more Falstaff. Although he is now politically distanced from Hal, he looms larger than ever as a mischievous figure who never ceases to fascinate with his unique blend of native wit, inventiveness, and corruption. Through a radical reconsideration of the play's text(s) and date, it is argued here for the first time that the character of Falstaff was called Oldcastle in Part 2 as well as in as in Part 1, and that it was the vetting of Part 2 for the 1596-7 Christmas performances at Court which led to the change of name in both plays. This edition moreover takes the view that the Folio-only passages in the play reflect the text of the original prompt-book.

Comments

Doukree Doukree
Not his best, to be sure, but good enough.
Uriel Uriel
It's perfect! And it came to me so fast!!!
Qag Qag
In terms of story line, Part II picks up where Part I ended, immediately after the Battle of Shrewsbury, where the supporters of Henry IV had crushed a force of rebels. In addition, the two principal characters of Part I return -- Prince Harry, the eldest son of Henry IV and the heir to his crown, and Sir John Falstaff, the boon companion of Prince Harry's frivolous youth. But the characters of Prince Harry and Falstaff are not the same as they were at the end of Part I. Harry has reverted back to being the shallow wastrel that he had been for most of Part I, before the sudden transformation that resulted in his rushing to his father's aid to help put down the rebellion. And Falstaff no longer is charming or noble in his roguery; he now is simply an aging boor. As Part II develops, Prince Harry once again undergoes a sudden transformation of character when his father the King is on his deathbed, such that after he assumes the crown as Henry V he coldly turns on and rejects his youthful mentor in debauchery, the now ignoble, toadying Falstaff.

While it arguably is Shakespeare's prerogative to forgo consistency in his characters from one play to the next -- in other words, to have each of his plays stand alone -- I am bothered by these inconstancies in the characters of Prince Harry and Sir John Falstaff. So while I was enthusiastic about "Henry IV, Part I", I react less warmly to HENRY IV, PART II. For the first time in my traversal of Shakespeare's plays, I sense a degree of manipulation.

Still, it is a moderately rich play. Four themes stand out. The first is a recurring one in Shakespeare's history plays -- namely, concern about the legitimacy of the monarchic rule and the toll on the psyche of the monarch ("Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown"). Related to that is the theme of betrayal, which is perhaps best exemplified when Prince John promises several rebellious nobles that they will be treated with mercy if they lay down their arms; as soon as they do so he orders their execution. That theme is also reflected in the question of how is one to know, concerning a colleague or friend, "thy face tomorrow" (a question, as reflected in its title, at the center of Javier Marías's marvelous three-volume novel "Your Face Tomorrow"). Indeed, it is a question that Falstaff probably should have asked concerning his pal Prince Harry. Yet a third theme has to do with the pernicious, destabilizing effect of "Rumour", or "false reports", or "smooth comforts false". And last, there is Death, which if not front and center, certainly pervades the atmosphere of HENRY IV, PART II.
Iesha Iesha
Colia