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eBook Altrive Tales (Collected Works of James Hogg) ePub

eBook Altrive Tales (Collected Works of James Hogg) ePub

by Gillian Hughes,James Hogg

  • ISBN: 0748618937
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Gillian Hughes,James Hogg
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Edinburgh University Press; 1 edition (July 11, 2003)
  • Pages: 368
  • ePub book: 1968 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1566 kb
  • Other: azw mobi mbr lrf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 872

Description

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James Hogg (1770 – 21 November 1835) was a Scottish poet, novelist and essayist who wrote in both Scots and English. As a young man he worked as a shepherd and farmhand, and was largely self-educated through reading

James Hogg (1770 – 21 November 1835) was a Scottish poet, novelist and essayist who wrote in both Scots and English. As a young man he worked as a shepherd and farmhand, and was largely self-educated through reading. He was a friend of many of the great writers of his day, including Sir Walter Scott, of whom he later wrote an unauthorized biography

Book digitized by Google from the library of Oxford University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tp.

Book digitized by Google from the library of Oxford University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tp.

James Hogg, Gillian Hughes. Altrive Tales was carefully prepared by Hogg in 1832 as the opening volume in a planned twelve-volume collected prose fiction series, intended as the culmination of his career as a storyteller. It opens with his own story. It opens with his own story of how a ragged servant-lad remade himself as a respected professional writer, the associate of Byron, Scott, Southey, Wordsworth and Galt. Hogg's frank and humorous 'Memoir of the Author's Life' is widely recognised as a classic of Romantic autobiography and an important record of early nineteenth-century Scottish culture. Edinburgh University Press, 11 Tem 2003 - 293 sayfa. Altrive Taleswas carefully prepared by Hogg in 1832 as the opening volume in a planned twelve-volume collected prose fiction series, intended as the culmination of his career as a storyteller. It opens with his own story of how a ragged servant-lad remade himself as a respected professional writer, the associate of Byron, Scott, Southey, Wordsworth and Galt

Address to Hector Levin: Aspect Press, 1992. London: James Cochrane and C. 1835. Includes ‘Memoir of the author’s life’ (. .

Address to Hector Levin: Aspect Press, 1992. of 80 donated to James Hogg Society members 1992 in memory of Norah Parr 1901-1989. Booklet contains verses 1, 2, 7, 5, 23, 24 of poem published in Scots Magazine 1805, with some later JH word changes and a woodcut, all printed by Phil Parr. Altrive tales: collected among the peasantry of Scotland, and from foreign adventurers. Includes ‘Memoir of the author’s life’ (p. -xciii) and ‘Reminiscences of former days’ (p. xciv-cli) both by Hogg. A boy’s song : a poem Stirling: University of Stirling Bibliographical Society, 1986.

So confesses Hogg with pawky self-mocking humour in Altrive Tales. The collection opens with Hogg's own story of how a ragged servant-lad remade himself as a respected professional writer, the associate of Byron, Scott, Southey, Wordsworth and Galt. The themes of the 'Memoir' continue in the tales that follow.

James Hogg's life-story is one of extraordinary transitions and in his own lifetime he was best known as a heaven-inspired and naive .

James Hogg's life-story is one of extraordinary transitions and in his own lifetime he was best known as a heaven-inspired and naive Scottish rustic who featured as the boozing buffoon of Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine. In his own fascinating Memoir this notoriously open-hearted man was curiously reticent about certain passages in his life.

and from a lifetime's work in the original manuscripts underpins Gillian Hughes' excellent biography. Gillian Hughes's biography is a welcome addition to Hogg scholarship. This is an admirable biography which does justice, with ample evidence, to a major writer who has waited more than a century for adequate recognition.

Hogg grew up in rural Ettrick Forest in a notable family of tradition-bearers, and in his first major poetry collection The Mountain Bardof 1807 he claims his rightful position at the centre of that culture

Hogg grew up in rural Ettrick Forest in a notable family of tradition-bearers, and in his first major poetry collection The Mountain Bardof 1807 he claims his rightful position at the centre of that culture. He learned to negotiate the erudite print culture of Edinburgh with the literary ballad, sometimes helped and sometimes hindered by his powerful friend, shifting the shape of his earlier manuscript and periodical poems accordingly.

Altrive Tales was carefully prepared by Hogg in 1832 as the opening volume in a planned twelve-volume collected prose fiction series, intended as the culmination of his career as a storyteller. It opens with his own story of how a ragged servant-lad remade himself as a respected professional writer, the associate of Byron, Scott, Southey, Wordsworth and Galt. Hogg's frank and humorous 'Memoir of the Author's Life' is widely recognised as a classic of Romantic autobiography and an important record of early nineteenth-century Scottish culture. Hogg's sharp eye for the latest publishing phenomena and pawky self-mocking humour is evident in his awareness of Altrive Tales as a contribution to the monthly-volume classic fiction series of the early 1830s following Sir Walter Scott's magnum opus edition of the Waverley Novels. Frankly pleading guilty to the egotism of presenting his own output to the world as a literary classic Hogg engagingly confesses, 'I like to write about myself: in fact, there are few