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eBook The Samoa Reader: Anthropologists Take Stock ePub

eBook The Samoa Reader: Anthropologists Take Stock ePub

by Hiram Caton

  • ISBN: 0819177202
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Hiram Caton
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: UPA (March 27, 1990)
  • Pages: 366
  • ePub book: 1841 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1478 kb
  • Other: doc mbr mobi rtf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 322

Description

The Samoa Reader book.

The Samoa Reader book. The Samoa Reader is a source book on the most extensive controversy in the history of anthropology, touched off by the publication of Derek Freeman's Margaret Mead and Samoa: The Making and Unmaking of an Anthropological Myth. Freeman's book purported to refute the most famous writing of the world's most honored and celebrated anthropologist.

Similar books and articles. Daniel Miller & Association of Social Anthropologists of the Commonwealth - 1995. Added to PP index 2015-02-02.

Caton, Hiram, ed. (1990) The Samoa Reader: Anthropologists Take Stock, University Press of America. Margaret Mead, 1901–1978: A Public Face of Anthropology": brief biography, Voice of America Page doesn't exist. Visited on May 15, 2014. Feinberg, Richard (1988). National Academy of Sciences Biographical Memoir.

Caton's publications on Margaret Mead, Derek Freeman, and the Samoa controversy are part of the standard literature. Among his contributions to the volume are two studies on Freeman's psychology.

The Samoa Reader: Anthropologists Take Stock. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1990. Cpte, James E. Adolescent Storm and Stress: An Evaluation of the Mead-Freeman Controversy. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 1994. Cote, James E. Much Ado about Nothing: The Fateful Hoaxing of Margaret Mead. Skeptical Inquirer, November/December 1998, v22n6, pp. 29–34. Was Mead Wrong About Coming of Age in Samoa? An Analysis of the Mead/Freeman Controversy for Scholars of Adolescence and Human Development .Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 1992, v21n5, pp. 499–527. Penguin Books, Harmondsworth, England. Race, Culture, and Evolution: Essays in the History of Anthropology.

Journal of Youth and Adolescence volume 29, pages587–605(2000)Cite this article. The Samoa Reader: Anthropologists Take Stock. University Press of America, Lanham, MD. Google Scholar.

The Samoa Reader: Anthropologists Take Stock". University Press of America. Richard Feinberg 1988 "Margaret Mead and Samoa: Coming of Age in Fact and Fiction" American Anthropologist 90: 656-663.

Ivan Brady, "The Samoa Reader: Last Word or Lost Horizon?," Current Anthropology 32, no. 4 (Aug.

The Samoa Reader: Last Word or Lost Horizon? The Samoa Reader: Anthropologists Take Stock. Ivan Brady, "The Samoa Reader: Last Word or Lost Horizon?," Current Anthropology 32, no. - Oc. 1991): 497-500.

A book of exquisite beauty and depth. Caton's keen sensibility and his gift for tuning in to the poetic dimension of spoken Arabic make the reader part of the sanctuary where he lived, a witness on the roads he traveled. Veena Das, Chair, Department of Anthropology, The Johns Hopkins University. An extraordinary work-beautifully crafted, deeply subtle, filled with an astonishing cultural sensibility. Steven C. Caton, a professor of anthropology at Harvard University and director of its Center for Middle Eastern Studies, is the author of Lawrence of Arabia: A Film's Anthropology. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and New York City.

The Samoa Reader is a source book on the most extensive controversy in the history of anthropology, touched off by the publication of Derek Freeman's Margaret Mead and Samoa: The Making and Unmaking of an Anthropological Myth. Freeman's book purported to refute the most famous writing of the world's most honored and celebrated anthropologist. This book seemed to many to be an attack on liberal values; anthropologists believed that it was a concerted assault on the reliability and conceptual structure of cultural anthropology in the name of "sociobiology." The Reader canvasses these and other issues by assembling, in readable form, the most cogent writings to come out of the controversy. This book is based on the study of unpublished sources, some of which are included.