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eBook Onoto Watanna: THE STORY OF WINNIFRED EATON (Asian American Experience) ePub

eBook Onoto Watanna: THE STORY OF WINNIFRED EATON (Asian American Experience) ePub

by Diana Birchall

  • ISBN: 0252026071
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Diana Birchall
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press (July 25, 2001)
  • Pages: 252
  • ePub book: 1393 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1497 kb
  • Other: mbr mobi lit lrf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 698

Description

Onoto Watanna: THE STORY. has been added to your Cart

Onoto Watanna: THE STORY. has been added to your Cart. While her eldest sister (now acknowledged as the mother of Asian American fiction), was writing stories of downtrodden Chinese immigrants under the name Sui Sin Far, Winnifred's Japanese romance novels and stories became all the rage, thrusting her into the glittering world of New York literati.

book by Diana Birchall. In 1901, the young Winnifred Eaton arrived in New York City with literary ambitions, journalistic experience, and the manuscript for A Japanese Nightingale, the novel that would sell many thousands of copies and make her famous. Her performances as a Japanese-American novelist, as a screenwriter and as a rancher doyenne would win applause from Daniel Defoe. Eaton/Watanna has become a focal interest of American scholars in recent years. As her granddaughter, Birchall had informaitonal advantages in writing on her.

Start by marking Onoto Watanna: The Story of Winnifred Eaton (Asian American .

Start by marking Onoto Watanna: The Story of Winnifred Eaton (Asian American Experience) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Diana Birchall truthfully pictured Winifred Eaton as a talented, inventive writer and a psychologically complicate woman. Diana Birchall also answered (at least partially) several questions that I had been wondering: 1. Did Winnifred fake her identity merely because of survival instinct and how did she feel about her own fabrication? Did she ever feel shame? 2. Was she never discovered by her audience or journalists and reporters at the height of her fame?

Authors: Diana Birchall. ISBN 13: 9780252026072.

Authors: Diana Birchall.

Asian American Experience. Birchall's engaging biography of her grandmother will appeal to a broad range of readers: scholars of Asian American literature, students of literary life in New York City, feminist historians exploring the careers of literary women, cinema historians concerned with the medium's early development in Hollywood, critics of Canadian literature, and teachers and practitioners of family history. Birchall was a novice biographer when she began work on this study; but in the process of writing it she transformed herself into a scholar.

Diana Birchall, author of Onoto Watanna: The Story of Winnifred Eaton Onoto Watanna (1875-1954) was born Winnifred Eaton, the daughter of a British father and a Chinese mother

Diana Birchall, author of Onoto Watanna: The Story of Winnifred Eaton Onoto Watanna (1875-1954) was born Winnifred Eaton, the daughter of a British father and a Chinese mother. The earliest essay here, A Half Caste, appeared in 1898, a year before Miss Numé: A Japanese-American Romance, the first of her best-selling novels. The last story, Elspeth, appeared in 1923.

Winnifred Eaton was a Canadian author and screenwriter. Although she was of Chinese-British ancestry, she published under the Japanese pseudonym Onoto Watanna and under the name Winifred Reeve. Eaton was the daughter of an English merchant, Edward Eaton, who met her Chinese mother while on a business trip to Shanghai. Her mother was Grace "Lotus Blossom" Trefusis, the adopted daughter of English missionaries.

Winnifred Eaton was only fourteen years old when one of her stories was accepted for publication by a Montreal . Onoto Watanna: The Story of Winifred Eaton by Diana Birchall (2001). List of Asian American writers.

Winnifred Eaton was only fourteen years old when one of her stories was accepted for publication by a Montreal newspaper that had already published pieces by her sister. Before long she also had articles published in several popular magazines in the United States, notably the Ladies' Home Journal. Poster for Klaw & Erlanger's production of A Japanese Nightingale in New York in 1903. She left home at the age of seventeen to take a job as a stenographer for a Canadian newspaper in Kingston, Jamaica. List of women writers.

Diana Birchall, Eaton's granddaughter, tells the Horatio Alger story of the woman who became Onoto Watanna. Her popular Japanese-themed romance novels thrust her into the glittering world of New York's literati. From there she leapt to Hollywood to become a scriptwriting protÈgÈe of Carl Laemmle at Universal Studios

Onoto Watanna : THE STORY OF WINNIFRED EATON. Asian American Experience (University of Illinois).

Onoto Watanna : THE STORY OF WINNIFRED EATON. By (author) Diana Birchall.

In 1901, the young Winnifred Eaton arrived in New York City with literary ambitions, journalistic experience, and the manuscript for A Japanese Nightingale, the novel that would sell many thousands of copies and make her famous. Hers is a real Horatio Alger story, with fascinating added dimensions of race and gender.

While commercially successful women writers were uncommon a century ago, Winnifred Eaton (1875-1954) cultivated a particular persona to set herself apart even within this rare breed. Born to a British father and a Chinese mother, Winnifred decided to capitalize on her exotic appearance while protecting herself from Americans' scorn of Chinese: she "became" Japanese, assuming the pen name Onoto Watanna. While her eldest sister, Edith Maude Eaton (now acknowledged as the mother of Asian American fiction), was writing stories of downtrodden Chinese immigrants under the name Sui Sin Far, Winnifred's Japanese romance novels and stories became all the rage, thrusting her into the glittering world of New York literati.

Diana Birchall chronicles the sometimes desperate, sometimes canny, always bold life of her "bad grandmother," about whom she knew almost nothing until her own adulthood. Here are the details of an amazing professional career as a journalist, a bestselling novelist, and a Hollywood scriptwriting protégée of Carl Laemmle at Universal Studios.

Here, too, is the personal saga of a woman who bore "a book and a baby a year" during her troubled first marriage--and who, at the age of fifty-six, wooed back her estranged second husband when her Hollywood career hit the skids during the Great Depression. Having achieved early fame as a Japanese romance writer, Winnifred later jettisoned the kimono and wrote books (including one entitled Cattle) set on the plains of Alberta, where her husband owned a ranch.

A chameleon? A desperate poseur? A shrewd businesswoman? She was all that, and much more, as Diana Birchall demonstrates. Navigating the shifting boundary between life and art, Birchall probes Winnifred's conflicting stories, personal tempests, and remarkable accomplishments, presenting a woman whose career was "sensational" in every sense.

Comments

Faezahn Faezahn
In my library I have dozens of books inherited from my parents and my grandparents. We have been readers for several generations, and I grew up with many of these books. One of these books was a novel called "The Heart of Hyacinth" by an author mysteriously named Onoto Watanna. The author was unknown to me, but I thought the book was one of the most beautiful of all the books I'd inherited, with lovely Japanese-style illustrations and drawings.
But now I've had a chance to learn about the woman who lurked behind that exotic nom de plume. I learn she was not Japanese at all, but half Chinese and half English. Yet her true story seems to be as fully exotic as any of the character's lives from her books.
Diana Birchall has done a wonderful job of bringing her fascinating grandmother to life. The book give a wonderful look at a most unusual woman, and what life was like for young women at the turn of the last century. At least what life was like when the young women were as self-confident and gutsy as the young Winnifred Eaton.
Shliffiana Shliffiana
Birchall's fascinating and beautifully written account of her grandmother's life is an important work for scholars in women's studies, Asian-American or American studies, Canlit, and the movie industry, and for the general reader seeking a compelling biography.
Other reviewers have mentioned Eaton/Watanna's background. I will stress instead the absorbing interest of Winnifred's successive reinventions of herself in societies that had no ready place for her. Like a brilliant slackrope walker with an increasingly awkward load, Winnifred managed to shift her balance not only to survive, but pulled off one tour de force after another. Her performances as a Japanese-American novelist, as a screenwriter and as a rancher doyenne would win applause from Daniel Defoe.
Eaton/Watanna has become a focal interest of American scholars in recent years. As her granddaughter, Birchall had informaitonal advantages in writing on her. Her graceful, well-considered book shows how glad we should be for Birchall's advantages.
Yozshujinn Yozshujinn
The path of literary biography can be a treacheous one . Too much detail and the work can descend into triviality , not enough and the reader is left feeling shortchanged and the book appears insubstantial
Diana Birchall succesfully avoids these pitfalls ,and draws the reader into the text delivering an insightful and captivating biography of her "Bad Grandmother".
Onoto Watanno / Winifred Eaton was , despite her Japanese pen name , of English/Chinese extraction .She was a Journalist, Screenwriter and author of numerous Japanese romances ,the most famous of which is "The Japanese Nightingale" first published in 1901 (and freshly republished a century later ). It is thought to have sold around 200,000 copies and was later made into a play and a silent movie.
Diana Birchall would seem to have inherited her grandmothers literary prowess and this book is a fascinating look into the world of literary pursuits and the life of Asian women in early twentieth century America.
kewdiepie kewdiepie
"A jolly, laughing lady" are the first words of the bigraphy; the last ones are: "To be able to share what I have learned with others has been a privilege and a joy. Has not this journey been an enviable inheritance in itself?"
Inbetween these words Birchall indeed shares with the reader the life of Winnifred, in personal and intimate detail. Birchall also seduces the reader into not just reading, but thinking about the culture and times Winnifred faced in her own inimitable style, from her life in Canada as young girl down to the years of Hollywood.
Normally I am none too fond of biographies but this one enchanted me, by the content and by the style of Birchall's writing. Full of zest, lifely images and easy to read on and on. As non native reader I appreciated this very much; it was a joy and a privilege to share. Would that all biographies were such a good read!
Maman Maman
I didn't mean to like Winnifred Eaton. After all, she was a bit of a fanfaronade and very much of a poseur, not at all the sort I wanted in my circle of intimates.
But Diana Birchall's sparkling biography changed my mind. Writing with unblinking honesty, Birchall describes the many lives that her chameleon grandmother lived, from journalist and novelist to story editor and screenwriter. Of most interest to me were the stories of her career as wife in two unconventional marriages and mother to four children. Birchall's graceful use of language is enhanced by her wit and intelligently ironic style. She concludes this delightful biography with the acknowledgment that sharing what she has learned about her grandmother has been a privilege and a joy. Surely it is no less a privilege and a joy for the reader.