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eBook Appian: Roman History, I, Books 1-8.1 (Loeb Classical Library #2) (Volume I) ePub

eBook Appian: Roman History, I, Books 1-8.1 (Loeb Classical Library #2) (Volume I) ePub

by Appian,Horace White

  • ISBN: 0674990021
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Appian,Horace White
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press (January 1, 1912)
  • Pages: 672
  • ePub book: 1277 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1655 kb
  • Other: lit rtf azw docx
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 332

Description

by Appian (Author), Horace White (Author).

by Appian (Author), Horace White (Author). ISBN-13: 978-0674990043. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).

Mobile version (beta). Mobile version (beta).

Appian, Roman History, Volume I. LCL 2: Find in a Library. Appian (Appianus) was a Greek official of Alexandria. He saw the Jewish rebellion of 116 CE, and later became a Roman citizen and advocate and received the rank of eques (knight). In his older years he held a procuratorship. He died during the reign of Antoninus Pius who was emperor 138–161 CE. Honest admirer of the Roman empire though ignorant of the institutions of the earlier Roman republic, he wrote, in the simple 'common' dialect, 24 books of 'Roman affairs', in fact conquests, from the beginnings to the times of Trajan (emperor 98–117 CE).

Roman History, I, Books 1-8 (Loeb Classica. The source of this part of Appian may have been the lost books of Polybius, from whom a quotation is given in section 132 of the Punic Wars

Roman History, I, Books 1-8 (Loeb Classica. In four volumes I. London. The source of this part of Appian may have been the lost books of Polybius, from whom a quotation is given in section 132 of the Punic Wars. Appian has been severely censured for want of According to modern canons accuracy in details. of criticism accuracy is the first and indispensable requisite of the historian, but it was not so in the General conformity to facts was, of ancient world. course, necessary, but in most cases the aim of the ancient writer was to make an interesting book or to furnish.

Appian, Horace White. 2016-02-19T21:43:07Z.

The Loeb Classical Library (LCL; named after James Loeb /loʊb/) is a series of books, originally published by Heinemann in London, today by Harvard University Press.

Appian (Appianus) was a Greek official of Alexandria. You may be interested in. Appian: Roman History, I, Books 1-. (Loeb Classical Library Appian, Horace White.

by Appian & Horace White. We will show in this book that drawing the human body need not be so difficult. in interpretive point of view, it allo. History of the Wars, Volume I: Books 1-2 (Persian War) (Loeb Classical Library). Chronology of American Military History: Vol. 1 Independence to Civil War 1775 to 1865; Vol. 2 Indian Wars to World War II 1866 to 1945; Vol. 3 Cold War to the War on Terror 1946 to Present. 13 MB·8,836 Downloads·New!. 68 MB·223 Downloads·New! death (after 558) is unknown.

Roman History, Volume I book. Hardcover, Loeb Classical Library 672 pages. Published January 1st 1912 by Harvard University Press (first published 1st 150). Roman History, Volume I: Books 1-. 0674990021 (ISBN13: 9780674990029).

Appian (Appianus) was a Greek official of Alexandria. He saw the Jewish rebellion of 116 CE, and later became a Roman citizen and advocate and received the rank of eques (knight). In his older years he held a procuratorship. He died during the reign of Antoninus Pius who was emperor 138–161 CE. Honest admirer of the Roman empire though ignorant of the institutions of the earlier Roman republic, he wrote, in the simple 'common' dialect, 24 books of 'Roman affairs', in fact conquests, from the beginnings to the times of Trajan (emperor 98–117 CE). Eleven have come down to us complete, or nearly so, namely those on the Spanish, Hannibalic, Punic, Illyrian, Syrian, and Mithridatic wars, and five books on the Civil Wars. They are valuable records of military history.

The Loeb Classical Library edition of Appian is in four volumes.

Comments

LoboThommy LoboThommy
The putting in kindle format of this very, very important series of books is a wonderful endeavour. They are better than the original, because they come with a Greek only, an English only, and the bilingual text.

Hope they keep appearing, and not only the Greek ones, but the ones in Latin too.

A word of advice: Put out first, some of the more popular ones, like Homer.

All of the history of the Roman Empire by Appian is now available in this and the next volumes.

Keep up the good work.

Peter
thrust thrust
Having taken (actually, it was compulsory until 1949) ancient Greek in the Hungarian style high school ("Gimnazium), this book is a convenient refresher in that language - and certainly less expensive than buying the hard-cover Loeb Library edition published by Harvard University Press.
Anararius Anararius
wonderful
Wymefw Wymefw
Quick. Delivery , good quality
Brariel Brariel
Loeb's volumes of Appian's Roman History Are attractively presented in uniform green matching covers. The binding is sewn and is sure to stand up well against time and reading wear and tear. Each of Loeb's volumes contains an English translation with the original greek on facing pages. A quick search of the web will give you the tools to pronounce some basic ancient greek. You will be able to hear what this work of literature originally sounded like some 2000 years ago.

Volume 1 covers Roman expansion in Italy to the Punic wars (the time where Rome really becomes a major player on the world stage). The introduction nicely places Appian at the pinnacle of Roman power (during the reign of Trajan) and provides an interesting historical context for the Histories.

The set is completed with Volume 2 Appian: Roman History, II, Books 8.2-12 (Loeb Classical Library #3) Volume 3 Appian: Roman History, Vol. III, The Civil Wars, Books 1-3.26 (Loeb Classical Library No. 4) and Volume 4 Appian: Roman History, Vol. IV, The Civil Wars, Books 3.27-5 (Loeb Classical Library No. 5)

Loeb's edition of of Appian's Roman History has been around for about 100 years, so it is a strong guess these volumes will be something your children and grandchildren can treasure as well.
Jwalextell Jwalextell
Appian was an Alexandrian Greek born in the late first century A.D. who clearly admired Rome but whose knowledge of Republican institutions was limited. A Roman citizen, he mainly practiced as an advocate in Alexandria and later Rome where he wrote these works. His style is plain and unadorned but indicative and factual: exemplary of his lawyering skills. His work is encyclopedic and chronological only in the general periods of those conquests. He approaches Rome in a categorical way beginning with the Empire itself and then divides it into its individual territories going over how they became Rome's from first to last. A good part of Appian's work is unfortunately fragmentary.

This first book starts with Appian's own preface and then goes on to his subjects in order: Kings, Early Italy; Samnites; Celts; Sicily and other islands; Wars in Spain; the Hannibalic War; the Punic Wars. Although a good part of Appian's work is lost, his work gives us an overwhelming abundance of information about Hannibal and the Second Punic War. There is much detail on the army Hannibal brought from Spain with the intent of destroying Rome herself at the core: 90,000 foot; 12,000 horse; and, of course, 37 elephants. It was a gigantic army size by standards of antiquity or even pre-19th century armies. He had half his army left before even crossing the Alps four months later but went ahead towards Rome anyway seeking converts or razing the ground wherever he could. He would roam all over Italy for another 13 years winning some great victories but Rome remained mercilessly tenacious. Rome would pursue him like the Furies until his old age all the way to Asia Minor where he finally committed suicide just to end the chase. That's enough to get me reading this book right there.

The Loeb library is reknown for its publications of classical texts in English and either Latin or Ancient Greek depending on the author. If you're a student or teacher of classics you can't go without this publication. This translation by Horace White is a pleasant work to read. This is a very good investment for anyone who wants to be illuminated as to what humanity achieved over 2000 years before we even existed: it's priceless!
INvait INvait
The translation is very good and you are reading what is considered a primary source for research and scholarship. If your library doesn't have this, there is a niche that needs to be filled.