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eBook Welcome to Lizard Motel: Children, Stories, and the Mystery of Making Things Up, A Memoir ePub

eBook Welcome to Lizard Motel: Children, Stories, and the Mystery of Making Things Up, A Memoir ePub

by Barbara Feinberg

  • ISBN: 0807071447
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Barbara Feinberg
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Beacon Press; First Edition edition (August 1, 2004)
  • Pages: 216
  • ePub book: 1514 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1140 kb
  • Other: lit lrf azw lrf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 281

Description

Welcome to Lizard Motel book.

Welcome to Lizard Motel book. Welcome to Lizard Motel: Children, Stories, and the Mystery of Making Things Up. by. Barbara Feinberg. Welcome to Lizard Motel is a completely original memoir about the place of stories in children's lives. It began when Barbara Feinberg noticed that her twelve-year-old son, Alex, who otherwise loved to read, hated reading many of the novels assigned to him in school.

Essentially, WELCOME TO LIZARD MOTEL begins in late summer as Feinberg realizes her passionate, bright and happy 12-year-old son, a lover of learning and all things Mel Brooks, is resisting the literature assigned for school. As one says, "It gives me a headache in the stomach. A teacher insists, "A good book is supposed to make you cr. Feinberg reads the books, which she names, many of which are award-winners. What she discovers is a world of emotional and physical violence, in which the message consistently emerges, wake up, kid, life is cruel, get.

Welcome to Lizard Motel is one of the most surprising books about reading and writing to come along in years. Not only does this rich and wonderfully readable memoir explore the world of children and stories, it also asks us to look at how our children are growing up.

Barbara Feinberg's memoir offers a fresh look at realistic children's fiction and how much literary suffering children should bear

Barbara Feinberg's memoir offers a fresh look at realistic children's fiction and how much literary suffering children should bear. Welcome to Lizard Motel (title explained in the course of the memoir) was published just after the era of problem novels, when the awards for children’s literature went mainly to books where somebody died, or faced a life-changing trauma, or divorce, or disease, etc. Death and loss drive all literature in a sense, so maybe the content wasn’t a problem so much as its presentation.

Welcome to Lizard Motel: Children, Stories, and the Mystery of Making Things U. Barbara Feinberg contends that most of the young adult novels that teachers assign to teenagers are dreary, depressing, and didactic.

Welcome to Lizard Motel: Children, Stories, and the Mystery of Making Things Up. By Barbara Feinberg.

Barbara Feinberg is the author of Welcome to Lizard Motel: Children, Stories, and the Mystery of Making Things Up. The book chronicles Feinberg's experiences as she tries to find out why her children - who love to read - generally hate the books they're assigned in school.

V ictor Serge was, and remains, unique: the only novelist to describe successfully, from the inside, the now long-lost milieu of the socialist movement in Europe, its Soviet product, and its destruction by Stalinism. He has been described by myself and others as a political Ishmael, comparable to the lone survivor of the wrecked vessel Pequod in Melville’s Moby-Dick. Born in 1890 in Belgium, to a family of Russian exiles, he died in 1947 in a Mexico City taxicab. He was very likely murdered by Soviet agents.

Barbara Feinberg's ''Welcome to Lizard Motel: Children, Stories, and the Mystery of Making Things Up'' (Beacon Press) conjures up memories of such youthful literary predilections

Barbara Feinberg's ''Welcome to Lizard Motel: Children, Stories, and the Mystery of Making Things Up'' (Beacon Press) conjures up memories of such youthful literary predilections.

Welcome to the Lizard Motel. Barbara Feinberg's new book is both a memoir of certain childhood memories and an indictment against the dismal state of books for young adults

Welcome to the Lizard Motel. Barbara Feinberg's new book is both a memoir of certain childhood memories and an indictment against the dismal state of books for young adults. Feinberg became concerned when her two children, once avid readers, became agitated at the prospect of reading the current crop of assigned literature for the upcoming school year. I mean Kipling’s Jungle Book, which is a collection of short stories, no similarity with the Disney product of the same name) posted by Termite at 11:37 AM on August 29, 2004

Welcome to Lizard Motel is a completely original memoir about the place of stories in children's lives. It began when Barbara Feinberg noticed that her twelve-year-old son, Alex, who otherwise loved to read, hated reading many of the novels assigned to him in school. These stories of abandonment, kidnapping, abuse, and more-called "problem novels"-were standard fare in his middle school classroom. Alex and his friends hated to read these books. As one of them said, "They give me a headache in my stomach." So Feinberg set out to discover just what these kids were talking about. She started to read the books, steeping herself in novels like Chasing Redbird, Bridge to Terabithia, The Pigman, and more. She consulted librarians, children's literature experts, and others, trying to get a handle on why young-adult novels had become so dark and gloomy and, to her mind, contrived.What she found both troubled and surprised her. "In the middle of the 1960s," observed one children's literature expert, "political and social changes leaned hard on the crystal cage that had surrounded children's literature for ages. It cracked and the world flowed in."Welcome to Lizard Motel documents this dramatic change in the content of young-adult novels but does so in a uniquely touching memoir about one family's life with books, stories, and writing. Feinberg's examination of the problem novel opens her eyes to other issues that affect children today-such as how they learn to write, how much reality is too much for a young child's mind, and the role of the imagination in children's experience. Quirky, moving, serious, and witty, Welcome to Lizard Motel is one of the most surprising books about reading and writing to come along in years. Not only does it explore the world of children and stories, but it also asks us to look at how our children are growing up. Feinberg wonders if, as a society, we have lost touch with the organic unfolding of childhood, with that mysterious time when making things up helps deepen a child's understanding of the world. This memoir will reacquaint readers with the special nature of children's imaginations.

Comments

Domarivip Domarivip
As a genuine antique mom, grandmom, teacher, and writer for children, I am one picky reader. Feinberg's book is outstanding. Outstanding on every page, for every thoughtful adult who realizes that our children are our future. We need to be exceedingly careful what we are "doing to them," to use scare quotes. I don't use them lightly. We should be very scared about many books being touted for young people. Why do so many-- especially the big medallion winners--feature death, divorce, child abuse, and the Holocaust? Why are so many characters seemingly alone in a terrifying position? Feinberg wonders, and so do I.
When is it mandatory for the REAL world to trample upon childhood? Age 6, or maybe 8? Should we have ripped off our optimistic, rose-colored glasses by age 9 and expect every strange man to rape us? To what purpose? I cry.
I expect that life will show us all sorrows aplenty, and I'd prefer to have young readers well grounded in hope, positive truths, and the knowledge that MOST adults are there to protect them, not betray them. For ages I have found the "problem novels" offered to mid-grade and young adult readers to be major problems themselves. They have efficiently robbed many of our readers of all joy in reading. Assigned reading is universally dreaded.
As you can tell, I am passionate about this topic, and grateful to Barbara Feinberg for tackling it so eloquently. If you are a parent, read the books your kids are reading. If you are a teacher or a librarian, watch out for me, because when we meet I will ask you to defend what you are teaching.
Joan Carris, [...]
Thofyn Thofyn
As a children's author myself, I'm delighted to find someone suggesting in a popular book what many of us children's authors have long realized: Problem novels are not written or published for children at all, but for educators and librarians, without whom most of those books would never survive.

I would add that a surprising number of librarians dislike and disapprove of fantasy, and would love to wean children from imaginative works. As such, they are well-meaning but misguided opponents of childhood development, which depends on fantasy and imagination for proper unfoldment. This is the prejudice that kept The Wizard of Oz out of public libraries for decades.

What's more, the "reality" of these problem novels is collectively far from realistic. Authors have actually been advised NOT to write novels about families with both a mother and a father. Only broken families allowed!

Before reading this book, I was not familiar with the writing programs of Lucy Calkins, but I can only say I'm glad I never found myself in their clutches, or I might never have become an author.
Zaryagan Zaryagan
In what is being called a memoir, an account of some difficult passages in her young children's lives that occurred across a period of several months, Barbara Feinberg manages to quietly but clearly indict the state of contemporary young adult literary fiction. She is courageous on several levels, from opening up her family life to readers to her willingness to say the emperor is wearing no clothes, which these days is the same as risking never being able to eat lunch in this town again.

Essentially, WELCOME TO LIZARD MOTEL begins in late summer as Feinberg realizes her passionate, bright and happy 12-year-old son, a lover of learning and all things Mel Brooks, is resisting the literature assigned for school. So are his friends. As one says, "It gives me a headache in the stomach." A teacher insists, "A good book is supposed to make you cry." Feinberg reads the books, which she names, many of which are award-winners. What she discovers is a world of emotional and physical violence, in which the message consistently emerges, wake up, kid, life is cruel, get over it, grow a callous or two. Feinberg believes in the power of literature to transform and to assist the individual to connect and grow but finds that none of these "problem" books offer the inspiration of imagination to suggest that the world can be negotiated, not just borne.

Feinberg weaves a tapestry of her research, her own memories of growing up and reading, the events of the months she records, the picture of her children's lives in and out of school, and the creative arts workshop she runs for children out of a church basement. In no way are the strands forced into a contrived mixture. She does not shout; she makes her points through a steady accumulation of consideration. She evocatively describes the procession of late summer into winter, echoing her son's entry into the preteen years and the scary event of her 7-year-old daughter's sudden health challenge. The world she gives us is authentic and it is interwoven, unlike the disengaged narratives of her son's assigned books.
I am hcv men I am hcv men
well written easy to read and timely. Lizard motel also makes parents, I am one! stop and think. Just because a book has an award does not automticly make it a good or appropriate book for our children. Feinbergs story is especially importaint in this time where parents are not able to take enough interest in their childrens lives, to pay more attention.
Malanim Malanim
This book was a pleasure to read -- unlike the many 'problem novels' currently featured on young adult lists. Do kids really need to read such bleak tales of divorce, death, and despair? The engaging text takes us along the author's thought path as she considers these books, talks to her children, and remembers what the books of her childhood meant to her evolving into an adult. Don't be put off by the terrible title -- it's nonfiction, slice-of-life at its best. I'd like to hear more from this author.