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eBook Broadway Boogie Woogie: Damon Runyon and the Making of New York City Culture ePub

eBook Broadway Boogie Woogie: Damon Runyon and the Making of New York City Culture ePub

by D. Schwarz

  • ISBN: 1403967318
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: D. Schwarz
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; 2003 edition (May 9, 2003)
  • Pages: 346
  • ePub book: 1901 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1862 kb
  • Other: lit doc lrf txt
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 113

Description

Runyon was tailor-made for New York City, which he draped with memorable characters, such as Harry the . The focus on Runyon is an apt vehicle for Schwarz's larger goal of writing a book about the culture of New York City. Frank Heron, The Syracuse Post-Standard

Runyon was tailor-made for New York City, which he draped with memorable characters, such as Harry the Horse, Sky Masterson, Dave the Dude, and Apple Annie. Runyon was a good listener, Schwarz says. That allowed him to absorb the tone of the times. He told people what New York was about. Frank Heron, The Syracuse Post-Standard. summarizes and discusses the vast oeuvre of Damon Runyon's fiction.

BROADWAY BOOGIE WOOGIE situates Runyon's stories and reportage in their New York, circa 1929-1946, context and tells us why Runyon's work still matters. The seriousness and skill that Schwarz used in earlier books to examine the writings of High Modernism (Conrad, Joyce, Woolf, Wallace Stevens) he uses here to illuminate the "wiseguy" world of BROADWAY BOOGIE WOOGIE. With insight and compassion Schwarz re-visits this world of gamblers, gangsters, swindlers, womanizers, and cheats and looks at America's ever present yearning to "take a walk on the wild side.

Runyon was tailor-made for New York City, which he draped with memorable characters, such as Harry the Horse . The roots of these subjects in Runyon's own life and the influence of his representation of New York City on later writers are important themes.

Runyon was tailor-made for New York City, which he draped with memorable characters, such as Harry the Horse, Sky Masterson, Dave the Dude, and Apple Annie.

Runyon, Damon, 1880-1946 - Criticism and interpretation, Runyon, Damon .

Runyon, Damon, 1880-1946 - Criticism and interpretation, Runyon, Damon, 1880-1946 - Contributions in journalism, Criminals in literature, Crime in literature, Broadway (New York, . - In literature, New York (. New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan.

While analyzing Damon Runyon's high spirited work in terms of historical contexts, popular culture, and of. .

While analyzing Damon Runyon's high spirited work in terms of historical contexts, popular culture, and of the changing function of the media, Schwarz argues that in his columns and stories Runyon was an indispensable figure in creating our public images of New York City culture, including our interest in the demi-monde and underworld that explains in part the success of The Godfather films and The Sopranos

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Broadway Boogie Woogie book. Start by marking Broadway Boogie Woogie: Damon Runyon and the Making of New York City Culture as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Includes bibliographical references (p. -339) and index. Personal Name: Runyon, Damon, 1880-1946 Criticism and interpretation. Download book Broadway boogie woogie : Damon Runyon and the making of New York City culture, Daniel R. Schwarz

Includes bibliographical references (p. Personal Name: Runyon, Damon, 1880-1946 Contributions in journalism. Geographic Name: Broadway (New York, . Geographic Name: New York (. Rubrics: Criminals in literature Crime in literature. Schwarz.

Damon Runyon and the Making of New York City Culture.

Broadway Boogie Woogie : Damon Runyon and the Making of New York City Culture. by Daniel R.

Alfred Damon Runyon (October 4, 1880 – December 10, 1946) was an American newspaperman and short-story writer

Alfred Damon Runyon (October 4, 1880 – December 10, 1946) was an American newspaperman and short-story writer.

While analyzing Damon Runyon's high spirited work in terms of historical contexts, popular culture, and of the changing function of the media, Schwarz argues that in his columns and stories Runyon was an indispensable figure in creating our public images of New York City culture, including our interest in the demi-monde and underworld that explains in part the success of The Godfather films and The Sopranos . In his lively and exuberant chapters that include a panoramic view of New York City between the World Wars - with a focus on its colourful nightlife - Schwarz examines virtually every facet of Runyon's career from sports writer, daily columnist, trial reporter, and Hollywood figure to the author of the still widely-read short stories that were the source of the Broadway hit Guys and Dolls . As part of his discussion of Runyon's art and the artistry of Runyon's fiction, Schwarz skilfully examines the special language of the Broadway stories known as 'Runyonese', and explains how 'Runyonese' has become an adjective for describing flamboyant behaviour.

Comments

Bremar Bremar
A good but not outstanding description of Runyon and his writings but without a focus. Does not read well either, more like a dissertation.
Shakar Shakar
"Broadway Boogie Woogie" is a fascinating read, both for anyone who finds New York City a fascinating city and for anyone with an interest in the origins of today's debate about how American journalism does and should shape the popular imagination. In "Broadway," Schwarz convincingly and vividly portrays an early-twentieth-century urban world of celebrity journalists and criminals, those who set the stage for that part of today's popular culture embodied in the celebrity cult phenomenon.
At the same time, he paints the true American Dream story of Damon Runyon, a man who used words--from his newspaper articles to his short stories--to pull himself out of humble beginnings to attain wealth and fame. But while Runyon took full advantage of the elevated status he reached in early 20th century society--somewhat in the tradition of William Randolph Heart--he never forgot where he came from: his highly entertaining stories about humble men and women were suffused with a great deal of sympathy and sometimes even glorified shadowy and desperate lives. Anyone who ever loved "Guys and Dolls" and "West Side Story" should read this book.
Whitecaster Whitecaster
One of the most interesting parts of this book is Schwarz's examination of how Runyon created the special language of his 'Runyonese', of how he put together the language of vaudeville, of the radio, of the criminals slang, of New York City street talk, of Yiddish mamaloshen, to build an idiom all his own yet reflecting the energy and vibrancy of his special world of gamblers, sportspeople, Broadway characters , of all types.

Schwarz is also interested in examining how Runyon contributed to the shaping of our image of New York City, of urban life in general.

An outstanding study especially for those who know who Nicely- Nicely and Harry the Horse are.
Skrimpak Skrimpak
BROADWAY BOOGIE WOOGIE situates Runyon's stories and reportage in their New York, circa 1929-1946, context and tells us why Runyon's work still matters. The seriousness and skill that Schwarz used in earlier books to examine the writings of High Modernism (Conrad, Joyce, Woolf, Wallace Stevens) he uses here to illuminate the "wiseguy" world of BROADWAY BOOGIE WOOGIE. With insight and compassion Schwarz re-visits this world of gamblers, gangsters, swindlers, womanizers, and cheats and looks at America's ever present yearning to "take a walk on the wild side." The book should appeal to not only students and scholars in American Studies, 20th Century American History, Urban and Immigration History, Working-Class Studies, and American Literature, but also to anyone who simply loves New York.